Data Loading...

Advanced Psychopharmacology Flipbook PDF

Advanced Psychopharmacology


106 Views
23 Downloads
FLIP PDF 5.23MB

DOWNLOAD FLIP

REPORT DMCA

www.postpartum.net

Perinatalhttp://www.postpartum.net Mental Health Advanced © 2021 PSI Psychopharmacology Training

Presented by: Postpartum Support Interna�onal

http://www.postpartum.net © 2021 PSI

PSI Advanced Perinatal Psychopharmacology Agenda

www.postpartum.net/professionals/trainings-events/advanced-pmh-psychopharmacology/ 9:00-9:15

Introductions of presenters, participants, objectives and how workshop functions PART 1: Antidepressants, Anxiolytics and Hypnotics

9:15-9:30

Case 1a: PTSD and depression; key principles in prescribing antidepressants

9:30-9:45

Case 2a: GAD; preconception planning; antidepressants and risk of autism

9:45-10:00

Case 3a: Anorexia nervosa and depression; antidepressants and neonatal side effects

10:00-10:15 Case 4a: Antenatal depression; antidepressants and neonatal pulmonary hypertension 10:15-10:25 Case 5a: Panic disorder; perinatal considerations for paroxetine 10:25-10:35 Case 6a: Hyperemesis gravidarum 10:35-10:50 break 10:50-11:05 Case 7a: Postpartum depression prevention 11:05-11:20 Case 8a: OCD and depression; antidepressants and breastfeeding 11:20-11:30 Case 9a: PTSD; prazosin 11:30-11:45 Case 10a: Childhood sexual abuse; suicidality; breastfeeding 11:45-12:00 Case 11a: Insomnia; sleep aids 12:00-1:00

Lunch break PART 2: Mood Stabilizers and Antipsychotics

1:00-1:15

Case 1b: Schizoaffective disorder; valproate

1:15-1:30

Case 2b: Bipolar disorder; preconception planning; lurasidone; FDA pregnancy risk categories

1:30-1:45

Case 3b: Lithium

1:45-2:00

Case 4b: Postpartum psychosis; mood stabilizer/antipsychotics and breastfeeding

2:00-2:15

Case 5b: Lamotrigine

2:15-2:30

Case 6b: Carbamazepine

2:30-2:45

Case 7b: Schizophrenia

2:45-3:00

break PART 3: Medication-assisted Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

3:00-3:15

Case 1c: Cigarette smoking

Postpartum Support International |6706 SW 54th Avenue | Portland Oregon 97219 | www.postpartum.net

3:15-3:30

Case 2c: Alcohol use disorders

3:30-3:45

Case 3c: Opioid use disorders PART 4: Medications for ADHD

3:45-4:00

Case 1d: ADHD

4:00-4:30

Wrap up, Q&A, evaluations 6 hours CME/CNEs

Postpartum Support International |6706 SW 54th Avenue | Portland Oregon 97219 | www.postpartum.net

POSTPARTUM SUPPORT  INTERNATIONAL PERINATAL PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY

1

Today’s Workshop • By working through cases together, you will hone your skills in:  Assessing relevant aspects of history and illness severity   Designing a treatment plan for perinatal mental health conditions 

including, but not limited to, psychotropic medication 

 Understanding and communicating risks of medications vs. risks of 

untreated symptoms during pregnancy and postpartum

• We will cover:  Antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics  Mood stabilizers and antipsychotics  Medications for substance use disorders  Medications for ADHD © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

2

Golden Rules of Treatment • When a woman is pregnant or postpartum, you have two 

patients

• All treatment decisions are   Based on a risk/benefit analysis   Made on a case by case basis

• No single medication is safest or “best” for use during 

pregnancy and the postpartum period

• No single study tells the whole story • All literature must be read critically, figuring out which 

conclusions are supported by the methodology

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

3

© Postpartum Support International

1

Antidepressants,  Anxiolytics, and Hypnotics

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

4

Case 1 Lynn is a 32‐year‐old woman with post‐traumatic stress disorder  (PTSD) and recurrent severe depressive episodes, with two past  suicide attempts. After several medication trials which were  ineffective or caused side effects, she’s doing well on venlafaxine.  Today she leaves you a voice mail saying she’s just tested positive for  pregnancy, estimated at 7 weeks.  She plans to discontinue  venlafaxine and wants your advice on how to taper, because she  knows abruptly stopping venlafaxine can be difficult.  How do you  respond? © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

5

What are the possible  perinatal risks of untreated  symptoms in Lynn’s case?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

6

© Postpartum Support International

2

Direct and Indirect Effects Direct Effects • Increased risk of suicide • Increased risk of preterm 

birth (4‐fold increase with  comorbid depression and  PTSD)

• Increased risk of heightened 

stress reactivity in offspring

Indirect Effects • Greater use of alcohol, 

cigarettes and other  addictive substances

• Less healthy nutrition • Higher body mass index • Less prenatal care • Reduced breastfeeding

1. Le Strat Y et al: J Affect Disord 135(1-3):128-38, 2011; 2. Barker ED et al: Br J Psychiatry 203(6):417-21, 2013; 3. McPhie S et al: Midwifery 2014 Jul 19 Epub; 4. Kim HG et al: Arch Womens Ment Health 9(2):103-7, 2006; 5. Grigoriadis S: J Clin Psychiatry 74(4):321-41, 2013; 6. Yonkers KA et al: JAMA Psychiatry 71(8):897-904, 2014; 7. Dennis CL, McQueen K: Pediatrics 123(4):e736-51, 2009 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

7

Long‐Term Effects on Offspring • More emotional problems and difficult 

temperaments

• More behavioral problems • Reduced cognitive functioning Barker ED et al: Brit J Psychiatry 203(6):417-21, 2013; 3. O’Donnell KJ et al: Psychoneuroendocrinol 38:1630-8, 2013 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

8

What are the possible  perinatal risks of venlafaxine?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

9

© Postpartum Support International

3

Based on Methodologically Sound Studies to Date… • Venlafaxine likely doesn’t increase the risk of  Birth defects

 Miscarriage, stillbirth or neonatal death  Cognitive impairment or behavioral problems   Autism

• Venlafaxine might increase the risk of  Premature labor (same as untreated depression)

 Postpartum hemorrhage (though more likely due to other confounds)

• Venlafaxine (near end of pregnancy) likely does increase the risk of  Transient neonatal side effects, including respiratory distress  Neonatal persistent pulmonary hypertension

Grigoriadis et al. J Clin Psychiatry 74(4):293-308, 2013; Einarson TR et al: J Popul Ther Clin Pharmacol 19(2):334-48, 2012; Huybrechts KF et al: New Eng J Med 370:2397-407, 2014; Petersen I et al: J Clin Psychiatry 77(1):e36-42, 2016 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

10

Lynn feels she should “tough it out” regarding her own  symptoms in order to protect her baby.  She is highly  distressed that her baby could experience side effects or  pulmonary hypertension, which she read about online.

What can you explain to help her gain perspective on  these adverse effects?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

11

• Statistically significant risks have different levels of clinical  significance, depending on effect size • Clinicians can help patients place risks in perspective  Neonatal antidepressant side effects usually last 1 – 2 days  Antidepressant exposure raises risk of persistent pulmonary  hypertension from 2/1,000 to at most 2.9/1,000 http://greenestreetfriends.org/student-life/life-skills; Ng QX et al: J Womens Health (Larchmt) 28(3):331-8, 2019; Masarwa R et al: Am J Obstet Gynecol 220(1):57, 2019; Ross LE et al: JAMA Psychiatry 70(4):436-43, 2013; Wisner KL et al: Am J Psychiatry 166:557, 2009 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

12

© Postpartum Support International

4

After you explain the risks of untreated symptoms, Lynn is  more inclined to continue an antidepressant while  pregnant.  Her friend, who’s also pregnant, said her  obstetrician recommended sertraline during pregnancy  because it’s well studied.  She asks you whether it would  make sense to switch from venlafaxine to sertraline.  How  do you respond?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

13

Switching Antidepressants • Based on a review of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) from 12 

countries, when starting an antidepressant de novo in a woman  who is pregnant or might become pregnant, some are preferred  due to being well studied and having favorable safety profiles  (e.g., sertraline).

• That said, if a woman is already taking an effective 

antidepressant, switching is discouraged.

 The new antidepressant may not work for her, risking symptom 

recurrence at a vulnerable time.

 Her fetus would then be exposed to both the risks of symptoms AND the 

risks of medication.

Molenaar NM et al: Aust N Z J Psychiatry 52(4):320-7, 2018 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

14

Case 2 Janelle is planning a pregnancy.  She has severe  generalized anxiety disorder, but has been much less  symptomatic for the past 2 years while taking  escitalopram.  She had planned to stay on it while  pregnant until reading that antidepressants increase the  risk of autism.  Her nephew has autism, and she can’t  bear the thought of doing that to a child.   How do you  help her think this through? © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

15

© Postpartum Support International

5

Do Antidepressants Cause Autism Spectrum  Disorders (ASD)? • Studies with major confounds showed an association between 

SSRI use during pregnancy and ASD in offspring

• Since then, there have been more careful studies  Sibling controls  Propensity matching 

• Most of those found no association  • One study found an increased small risk after antidepressant 

exposure (AOR 1.45); if that’s a true finding, refraining from  antidepressants would reduce the risk of autism by 0.08% • Risk of autism in offspring is greater in women with psychiatric  disorders who don’t use SSRIs than in women who do Probably Not © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

16

Case 3 Aimee has a history of anorexia nervosa and severe  depressive episodes, both now well controlled with  psychotherapy and fluoxetine 80 mg daily.  She is in her  32nd week of a healthy pregnancy, taking fluoxetine  regularly.  She knows she’s never supposed to abruptly  stop fluoxetine, yet she realizes that when her baby is  born the baby will abruptly stop.  She asks you if her  baby could have withdrawal problems.  What do you  tell her? © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

17

Neonatal Side Effects from Maternal  Antidepressant Use  • Noted in up to 25‐30% of exposed infants   22% of exposed infants had mild side effects  3% of exposed infants had severe side effects

• May be due to abrupt discontinuation or hepatic immaturity • Influenced by baby’s genotype • Begin within minutes to hours after birth • Usually last 1 – 2 days; rarely last 2 – 6 weeks  • Can happen from any antidepressant Forsberg L, Navér L, Gustafsson LL et al; McLean K, Murphy KE, Dalfen A et al, Oberlander TF; Warburton W, Misri S et al; McDonagh MS, Matthews A, Phillipi C et al. © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

18

© Postpartum Support International

6

Neonatal Side Effects Reported from In  Utero Antidepressant Exposure • Sleep changes

• Respiratory distress* 

(OR=2.20)

• Fewer different 

• Tremor (OR=7.89)*

behavioral states

• Jitteriness, restlessness, 

shivering

• Increased or decreased 

muscle tone

• Hypoglycemia

• Eating difficulties • Seizures • Prolonged QT interval • Cardiac arrhythmias

*Significantly different with antidepressant exposure Forsberg L, Navér L, Gustafsson LL et al; McLean K, Murphy KE, Dalfen A et al, Oberlander TF; Warburton W, Misri S et al; McDonagh MS, Matthews A, Phillipi C et al. © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

19

Case 4 Doreen has developed new‐onset major depression in  the 30th week of gestation of her first pregnancy.  She’s  considering taking an antidepressant.  She’s not  concerned about birth defects at this stage of  pregnancy, and isn’t too worried about the possibility of  brief infant side effects at birth.  But she wants to know  if ANY serious problems could happen to her baby from  antidepressant exposure at this stage.  What do you tell  her? © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

20

Antidepressants and Risk of Neonatal  Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension • Nearly all studies find increased risk of neonatal 

persistent pulmonary hypertension (PPHN) after SSRI  exposure in late pregnancy

• Risk is only found with serotonergic antidepressants • Animal study finds same risk and identifies possible 

mechanism

• Rare  General population prevalence 2/1000  Combined reported cases after SSRI exposure at most 2.9/1000  1,615 women would need to take SSRIs for 1 baby to have this 

adverse effect

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

21

© Postpartum Support International

7

Case 5

Robin is planning a pregnancy.  For the past 3 years  she’s taken paroxetine for panic disorder, with excellent  results.  A previous trial of fluoxetine was ineffective.   She doesn’t want to start having panic attacks again.   She asks whether she should switch to a different  medication, or discontinue medication altogether and  try psychotherapy.  What do you advise?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

22

Peripartum Panic Disorder • No increased risk of pregnancy complications • Symptoms may worsen postpartum • Clinical presentation  Catastrophic interpretations of altered bodily sensations  Vomiting/anxiety cycle  Excessive worry about effects of symptoms on fetus, on childbirth, and on 

parenting

 With agoraphobia: reduced prenatal care; difficulty leaving home to give birth Yonkers KA et al: JAMA Psychiatry 74(11):1145-52, 2017; Bandelow B et al: Eur Psychiatry 21(7):495-500, 2006 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

23

Should Paroxetine Be Avoided During  Pregnancy? Findings about teratogenicity are inconsistent.  However… • Several meta‐analyses and a large study find a specific link between paroxetine 

use during pregnancy and cardiovascular (CV) malformations in offspring.

• In a (non‐systematic) World Health Organization database, paroxetine was 

associated with more neonatal side effects than other antidepressants.

• Weight gain and sedation, common side effects with paroxetine, can increase 

risks during pregnancy and postpartum.

• It is the only antidepressant with a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 

advisory cautioning about its use during pregnancy.

Bottom line: not contraindicated during pregnancy, but not first choice if psychotherapy  or other agents are effective Grigoriadis et al. J Clin Psychiatry 74(4):293-308, 2013; Bar-Oz B et al: Clin Ther 29(5):918-26, 2007; Wurst KE et al Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol 88(3):159-70, 2010; Myles N et al: Aust New Zealand J Psychiatry 47(11):1002-1012, 2013; Ban L et al: Br J Obstet Gynecol 2014 Mar 11 Epub; Sloot WN et al. Reprod Toxicol 28(2):270-82, 2009; Sanz EJ et al. Lancet 365(9458):451-3, 2005 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

24

© Postpartum Support International

8

CBT for Perinatal Panic Disorder • Psychoeducation   Normal somatic sensations during pregnancy; overlap with panic symptoms  Specific symptoms that warrant a call to the prenatal clinic or emergency room

• Near the end of pregnancy, focus on slowing rather than deepening breathing • Self‐chosen imagery during obstetric exams and labor • Exposure for agoraphobia   Initiate prenatal care with home visits  Accompany patient to the prenatal clinic at first  Foster specific preparation for the hospital visit Wiegartz PS et al: The Pregnancy & Postpartum Anxiety Workbook. Oakland: New Harbinger, 2009; Robinson L et al: Can J Psychiatry 37:623-6, 1992 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

25

Case 6 Chantel has hyperemesis gravidarum (extreme nausea  and vomiting during pregnancy).  She has had to be  hospitalized 3 times for intravenous nutritional support.   She is now in her 23rd week of gestation and can’t  imagine making it through the rest of the pregnancy.   She has developed severe major depression and  intense anxiety.  She’d like pharmacotherapy but is  terrified that an antidepressant could worsen her  hyperemesis.  What do you advise?  © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

26

Mirtazapine During Pregnancy • Unlike other serotonergic antidepressants, 

nausea is not a typical side effect of mirtazapine

• Can be administered as a disintegrating tablet • No increased risk of birth defects • Increased rate of preterm birth (but confounds 

not ruled out)

• Sedation and weight gain are common side 

effects

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

27

© Postpartum Support International

9

Case 7

Jaronda and Shawn come to see you because they’d like  to start a family together, but they’re concerned about  Jaronda’s risk of postpartum depression.  Jaronda’s  mother, sister, and maternal aunt all had severe  postpartum depressive episodes.  Jaronda has no  history of mental health problems.

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

28

Questions to Ask • What additional information is important to 

ask about?

• What interventions can reduce the risk of 

postpartum depression?

• Which would you recommend for Jaronda, 

and why?

• How would you involve Shawn? © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

29

Preventing Perinatal Depression:  Psychotherapy • Interpersonal Psychotherapy  Enhances interpersonal skills,  ability to tolerate loss, coping with perinatal role 

transitions

 Strong evidence for preventing and treating perinatal depression  Perinatal adaptation: Reach Out, Stand Strong, Essentials for New Mothers (ROSE)

• Cognitive Behavioral Therapy  Helps counter “perfect mother” cognitions  Perinatal adaptation: Mothers and Babies

Strongly recommended by US Preventive Services Task Force  https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/perinatal-depression-preventiveinterventions?ds=1&s=perinatal depression © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

30

© Postpartum Support International

10

What Else Prevents Postpartum Depression? • Antidepressants (sertraline specifically studied) • Estrogen?   Posited to slow the otherwise abrupt postpartum decline  Promising preliminary data; not adequately studied

• No better than placebo  Progestogens  Omega‐3 essential fatty acid supplementation Werner E et al: Arch Womens Ment Health 18(1):41-60, 2015 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

31

Case 8 Molly comes to you with intense distress.  She  confesses that she has repeated thoughts about  smothering her 2‐month‐old baby with a pillow.  She  feels she is horrible and an unfit mother and has  become very depressed.  She has told her husband Ray  about the depressive feelings, but not about the  thoughts; she believes he would divorce her if he knew.   She avoids being alone with the baby.  Ray is afraid he’ll  lose his job due to time spent at home; he coaxed Molly  to meet with you.  How do you approach this case? © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

32

Targets of CBT for Perinatal OCD • Cognitive work   Probability bias: Molly erroneously believes that having the 

thought increases the chance she would actually smother her baby, which is why she avoids being along with the baby

 Morality bias: Molly believes she is terrible and an unfit 

mother just because she has a bad thought, despite no bad  actions

• Behavioral work  By avoiding being alone with her baby, Molly is reinforcing 

her anxiety and her belief that she can’t parent effectively

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

33

© Postpartum Support International

11

Molly would like to do Exposure and Response  Prevention (ERP) psychotherapy, but feels her anxiety is  too intense.  She asks if there’s a medication that could  help, that she could take while breastfeeding.  Which  would you suggest?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

34

Medication

% of Maternal Dose to Breastfeeding Baby

Bupropion

2.0% - 5.1%

Possible seizures

Citalopram

2.5% - 9.4%

Uneasy sleep, drowsiness, irritability, weight loss, restlessness

Reported Side Effects to Breastfeeding Babies*

Desipramine

1.0%

None

Desvenlafaxine

5.5% - 8.1%

None

Duloxetine

0.14% - 0.82%

None

Escitalopram

3.9% - 7.9%

Enterocolitis

Fluoxetine

1.1% - 12.0%

Excessive crying, irritability, vomiting, watery stools, difficulty sleeping, tremor, somnolence, hypotonia, decreased weight gain, hyperglycemia, hyperactivity, reduced rooting, reduced nursing, grunting, moaning More rapid weight gain, sleeping through the night earlier

Mirtazapine

0.6% - 3.5%

Nortriptyline

1.3%

None

Paroxetine

0.1% -4.3%

Agitation, difficulty feeding, irritability, sleepiness, constipation, SIADH

Sertraline

0.4% - 2.3%

Benign sleep myoclonus, transient agitation

Venlafaxine

3.0% - 11.8%

None

*Based on case reports or case series of exposure as monotherapy during breastfeeding; no causal relationship is established in most cases

35

Molly is hesitant to take a daily medication.  She asks if it  would be okay to use a benzodiazepine as needed  instead.  She asks whether it would make sense to  “pump and dump” breast milk after taking the  benzodiazepine so it wouldn’t affect her baby.

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

36

© Postpartum Support International

12

Benzodiazepines and Breastfeeding • Sedation is the main reported side effect (41 weeks when mood stabilizer was maintained and  only 9 weeks when treatment was discontinued (p50% likelihood of  having another postpartum psychotic episode1

 Family History – In a study of 152 women with bipolar I disorder2  74% of those with a first‐degree relative who had experienced postpartum psychosis  developed postpartum psychosis  30% of those without this family history developed postpartum psychosis 1. Sit D et al: J Womens Health (Larchmt): 15(4):352-68, 2006; 2. Jones I, Craddock N: Am J Psychiatry 158(6):913-7, 2001 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

75

© Postpartum Support International

25

After considerable psychoeducation, and coaxing by her  relatives, Ana agrees to take an antipsychotic mood  stabilizer, but insists that it must be the one that is least  present in breast milk.  Which do you recommend?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

76

Mood Stabilizers/Antipsychotics and Breastfeeding

*Depending on available data, reported as either estimated weight-adjusted per cent of the mother’s dose ingested by a breastfeeding baby, or as infant serum level range of the medication and any active metabolites. **Based on case reports or case series of exposure as monotherapy during breastfeeding; no causal relationship is established in most cases. © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

77

Case 5

Renita has bipolar disorder, well‐controlled on  lamotrigine.  She just learned she’s pregnant.  She read  online that lamotrigine causes cleft lip in babies exposed  during pregnancy, so she emails to let you know she’s  stopping it.  How do you respond?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

78

© Postpartum Support International

26

Lamotrigine (LTG) During Pregnancy • Despite prior concerns, it does NOT increase risk of oral clefts  Concern arose from North American Antiepileptic Drug (AED) Pregnancy 

Registry, in which infants whose mothers were prescribed LTG had  significantly more oral clefts than comparison infants1

 A population‐based case‐control study surveying 3.9 million births from 

19 registries did not confirm this association2

 Subsequent studies and meta‐analysis also have not found this link3‐6

• Behavioral teratogenicity  No increased neurodevelopmental or cognitive abnormalities in children 

exposed in utero7

1. Holmes LB et al: Neurol 70(22 Pt 2):2152-8, 2008; 2. Dolk H et al: Neurol 71(10:714-22, 2008; 3. Cunnington MC et al: Neurol 76 (21):1817-23, 2011; 4. Mølgaard-Nielsen D et al: JAMA 305(19):1996-2002, 2011; 5. Veiby G et al: J Neurol 261(3):579-88, 2014; 6. Pariente G et al: CNS Drugs 31(6):439-50, 2017; 7. Cummings C et al: Arch Dis Child 96(7):643-7, 2011 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

79

After hearing your evidence‐based information about  risks of untreated symptoms and risks of lamotrigine,  Renita decides to stay on lamotrigine.  She wonders if  she should lower the dose, “to be on the safe side”.   What do you advise?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

80

Lamotrigine: Perinatal Pharmacokinetics • Pregnancy lowers serum levels 

of lamotrigine.

• Average reduction is 50% ‐ 60%, 

with considerable individual  variation.

• Begins early in pregnancy; most 

pronounced by 3rd trimester.

• Serum level increases 

postpartum; average increase  from end of pregnancy to 5  weeks postpartum is 154%.

Tomson T et al: Epilepsia 54(3):405-14, 2013; Clark CT et al: Am J Psychiatry 170(11):1240-7, 2013 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

81

© Postpartum Support International

27

Case 6

Greta has bipolar disorder, well controlled with  carbamazepine.  Ever since starting carbamazepine she’s  bruised easily, but thought the benefit well worth this  side effect.  Now she’s planning pregnancy and asks  whether excessive bleeding could be a bigger problem.   She also asks about any risk of birth defects.  What do  you tell her?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

82

Carbamazepine (CBZ) During Pregnancy • Increased risk of neural tube defects and other 

anomalies

 Lower risk than valproate  Higher risk than lamotrigine

• Probably no behavioral teratogenicity • Decreased neonatal size • Transient hepatic function abnormalities (case reports) Weston J et al: Cochrane Database Syst Rev 11/7/16 Jentink J et al: BMJ 341:c6581, 2010; Banach R et al: Drug Saf 33(1):73-9, 2010; Pennell PB et al: Epilepsy Behav 24:449-56, 2012; Kaaja E et al: Neurol 58(4):549-53, 2002; Frey B et al: Ann Pharmacother 36(4):644-7, 2002; Harden CL et al. Epilepsia. 2009;50(5):1247-55 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

83

A Preventable Complication of  Carbamazepine? • Carbamazepine depletes vitamin K, which is essential for 

clotting ability.

• Maternal vitamin K deficiency may also affect fetal mid‐

facial and nasal septum growth.

• Unclear whether exposed infants are at greater risk of 

hemorrhage or malformations.

• Unclear whether maternal Vitamin K supplementation 

during pregnancy can reduce risks.

Kazmin A et al: Can Fam Physician 56(12):1291-2, 2010; livestrong.com © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

84

© Postpartum Support International

28

Carbamazepine (CBZ) During Pregnancy:  Guidelines to Reduce Risk • Supplement folate before and during pregnancy • Administer vitamin K to the newborn per pediatric 

recommendations

• For exposure during neural tube formation (14‐35 

days after conception), maternal alpha fetoprotein,  ultrasound or amniocentesis for neural tube  disorder evaluation

• Obtain free (not total) serum levels when needed Jentink J et al: BMJ 341:c6581, 2010; Banach R et al: Drug Saf 33(1):73-9, 2010; Pennell PB et al: Epilepsy Behav 24:44956, 2012; Kaaja E et al: Neurol 58(4):549-53, 2002; Frey B et al: Ann Pharmacother 36(4):644-7, 2002; Harden CL et al. Epilepsia. 2009;50(5):1247-55 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

85

Case 7 At a routine check‐up, Hattie tells her  obstetrician/gynecologist, Dr. Martin, that she and her  husband Jerome are now trying to conceive.  Dr. Martin  asks you to meet with Hattie and talk her out of this.   Hattie has schizophrenia, well controlled on olanzapine.   Dr. Martin is concerned about genetic transmission of  schizophrenia, risks of olanzapine, risks of Hattie  destabilizing, and risks of psychotic symptoms to the  fetus.  How do you approach this?  © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

86

Perinatal Risks of Schizophrenia • Increased obstetric complications • Many indirect factors may contribute  More often unpartnered  Higher pre‐pregnancy body mass index  More likely to smoke, drink alcohol, and use other addictive substances  More likely to have abnormal glucose tolerance tests

• Heritability   Estimated at 79%  6x more likely to develop schizophrenia if a first‐degree relative has it

• Ethics  Principle of justice guides us to treat schizophrenia no differently than other heritable, chronic 

illnesses

Simoila L et al: Arch Womens Ment Health 23(1):91-100, 2020; Chou IJ et al: Schiz Bull 43(5):1070-8, 2017; Hilker R et al: Biol Psychiatry 83(6):492-8, 2018; Miller LJ: Psychiatr Clin N Amer 32(2):259-70, 2009 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

87

© Postpartum Support International

29

Assessing Hattie’s Risk Factors • She has excellent insight into her illness and takes 

olanzapine regularly.

• Since starting olanzapine, she is rarely symptomatic and 

has had no high‐risk symptoms.

• She is partnered (married to Jerome, who is supportive). • She does not smoke, drink alcohol, or use other addictive 

substances.

• She has become overweight since starting olanzapine. • Several blood relatives have diabetes. © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

88

Perinatal Use of Olanzapine • No increased risk of congenital anomalies • Increased risk of  Excessive weight gain  Gestational diabetes

• Breastfeeding  Baby is estimated to ingest 0.3 – 1.1% of the mother’s 

dose, adjusted for weight

 Case reports of somnolence, irritability, tremor 

insomnia

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

89

Medications for Substance  Use Disorders

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

90

© Postpartum Support International

30

Case 1

Jacinda is a 27‐year‐old woman with a history of  recurrent major depressive episodes and persistent  depressive disorder, much improved since taking  fluoxetine.  She is planning a pregnancy, and for this  reason wants to quit smoking cigarettes.  She asks you  about switching from fluoxetine to bupropion.  What do  you advise?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

91

Risks of Cigarette Smoking During Pregnancy • Low birth weight • Preterm birth • Perinatal loss (miscarriage, stillbirth) • Sudden infant death syndrome • Possible increase in cardiovascular birth defects

• Reducing number of cigarettes smoked might not help if women  then inhale more deeply • Most women who still smoke after their first prenatal visit have  difficulty quitting without medical intervention Iokakeimidis N et al: Hellenic J Cardiol 60(1):11-5, 2019 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

92

Perinatal Use of Bupropion • May help with smoking cessation; unclear if it helps prevent relapse • Less well studied in pregnancy than serotonin‐selective reuptake inhibitors • Most studies don’t show increased risk of birth defects, but several show increased risk of 

cardiovascular anomalies after first trimester exposure compared to non‐exposed infants or  other antidepressant exposure

• Other possible risks  Miscarriage  Lowered seizure threshold (problematic with pre‐eclampsia)  Attention‐deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in offspring (might be confound by indication)  Case reports of fetal cardiac arrhythmia and neonatal hyperinsulinism Stotts AL et al: Am J Perinatol 32(4):351-6, 2015; Louik C et al: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 23(10):1066-75, 2014; Thyagarajan V et al: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 21(11):1240-2, 2012; Alwan S et al Am J Obstet Gynecol 203(1):e1-6, 2010; Chun-Fai-Chan B et al. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005;192(3):932-6; Ross S & Williams D: Expert Opin Drug Saf 4(6):995-1003, 2005; Figueroa R: J Dev Behav Pediatr 31(8):641-8, 2010; Leventhal K et al: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 89(7):980-1, 2010; Gisslen T et al: J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 24(9-10):819-22, 2011 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

93

© Postpartum Support International

31

Jacinda opts to remain on fluoxetine and not switch to  bupropion.  She’d like information on other smoking  cessations options as she plans her pregnancy.   Counseling hasn’t helped her in the past; she’s  interested in a medication option.

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

94

Smoking Cessation in Pregnancy • Varenicline  Studies to date show no evidence of increased birth defects, though data 

are very limited

 Short term use while planning a pregnancy could be helpful  Caution in patient with prior depression; can increase suicidality

• Nicotine replacement  Eliminates exposure to non‐nicotine toxins in cigarettes  No clear data about effects on pregnancy outcome  Gum gives less fetal exposure than patch

• Don’t give up on nonpharmacologic counseling; pregnancy can 

enhance motivation! 

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

95

Smoking Cessation in Pregnancy: Other Considerations • Electronic nicotine delivery systems (vaping)  Many pregnant women believe vaping is safer than cigarettes.  This 

perception can reduce motivation to quit.

 Data are limited but suggest vaping is higher risk than abstaining but 

lower risk than cigarettes – e.g., a study found that vaping reduced risk for  preterm birth compared to cigarettes, but had similar risk for fetal growth  restriction.

• Excessive weight gain can happen after smoking cessation and 

can independently increase perinatal risks.  Proactively forming  a plan for eating patterns and exercise can help.

Wang X et al: Prev Med 134:106041, 2020 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

96

© Postpartum Support International

32

Case 2 Patricia is an Army Veteran who started drinking 6‐8  glasses of  alcohol daily after returning from  deployment to Afghanistan to cope with flashbacks and  anxiety stemming from combat trauma.  She now  comes for help achieving and maintaining sobriety  because she just discovered she is pregnant, in her 14th week of gestation.  She explains that AA and other  nonpharmacologic addiction treatments have never  sufficed for her; she wants medication‐assisted  treatment after detox.  What do you advise? © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

97

Risks of Alcohol Use During Pregnancy • Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS)  Major congenital malformations  Cognitive impairment  Distinct facial features which lessen over time

• Fetal alcohol effects (FAE)  Spectrum of milder symptoms without full FAS

• Miscarriage (with 5 or more drinks per week) • Stillbirth (more than 6‐fold increase with 5 or more drinks per 

week)

• Newborn infections (with 7 or more drinks per week) © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

98

Medications for Alcohol Use Disorders:  Perinatal Considerations • Limited data on effects during pregnancy of the 3 FDA‐approved medications • Naltrexone  Not studied specifically for pregnant women with alcohol use disorders  In pregnant women with opioid use disorders, no differences in congenital anomalies, 

miscarriage or stillbirth compared to women using methadone or buprenorphine

 Associated with increased urogenital anomalies compared to no opioid exposure, in one 

study

• Acamprosate  No increased risk of congenital anomalies or low birth weight in one small study

• Disulfiram  Works by inhibiting metabolism of alcohol, causing buildup of acetaldehydes; unknown 

what this might do to a fetus

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

99

© Postpartum Support International

33

Don’t Give Up On Nonpharmacologic Interventions! • Motivational interviewing • Treat underlying conditions – e.g. trauma‐

focused psychotherapy for PTSD

• Address barriers to care  Fear of custody loss  Stigma  Logistics – lack of childcare, transportation Frazer Z et al: Drug Alcohol Depend 205:107652, 2019 © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

100

Case 3

Kasey has a longstanding heroin addiction.  When she  became pregnant, she started methadone and has  successfully abstained from heroin.  She is now in her  third trimester.  She asks if she should taper and  discontinue methadone to prevent neonatal abstinence  syndrome.  What do you advise?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

101

Opioid Use Disorders During Pregnancy • Higher risk with an addictive pattern of use, due 

to cycles of intoxication and withdrawal. 

• Addictive‐pattern opioid use is associated with 

preterm birth, low birth weight, reduced infant  head circumference and sudden infant death  syndrome. 

• Confounds are difficult to rule out!  • Neonatal abstinence syndrome can occur; it can 

be managed if severe with administration and  tapering of opioids.

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

102

© Postpartum Support International

34

Methadone Use During Pregnancy • Improves pregnancy outcomes compared to addictive‐pattern opioid use • Studies comparing methadone maintenance versus methadone taper and 

discontinuation during pregnancy

 Methadone withdrawal leads to high relapse rates and increased risk of stillbirth  Methadone maintenance leads to better outcomes

• Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is experienced by the majority of

newborns exposed to methadone throughout pregnancy 

• The likelihood and severity of NAS appear to be dose‐dependent • Buprenorphine is a viable alternative  Crosses placenta less  Less neonatal abstinence syndrome © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

103

Medications for ADHD

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

104

Case 1

Brynn is a 27‐year‐old woman who has had ADHD since  childhood, first diagnosed in high school.  Before using  medication, she got in two car accidents due to distractibility and  inattention, and was struggling in school.  At age 19 she began  methylphenidate.  Since then, she successfully completed a PhD  program and works as a biomedical engineer.  She’s had no  difficulty driving.  She’s planning a pregnancy and wants your  advice about methylphenidate.  What do you suggest?

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

105

© Postpartum Support International

35

ADHD and the Perinatal Period • No studies of the effects of untreated ADHD symptoms during pregnancy.  • Functional impairment depends on illness severity and attentional demand 

(how much focus is needed for the patient’s social and occupational roles).  

• With driving, impaired focus could be life‐threatening. • Life transitions during pregnancy and postpartum can change attentional 

demand.  Many new mothers with ADHD find it challenging to keep track of  everything, especially with sleep deprivation and less structure. 

• If ADHD symptoms impair relationships, they may detract from partner 

collaboration and social support during the transition to motherhood.

• If ADHD symptoms reduce self‐care (e.g., preparing healthy meals, arriving to 

prenatal appointments on time) they could indirectly adversely affect pregnancy  outcome. 

• The effect of ADHD on functioning may be strongly influenced by structure and 

social support.

© 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

106

“Mommy Brain”??? • During pregnancy, many women report impaired attention, but 

most studies don’t find cognitive differences between pregnant  and nonpregnant women (some find subtle differences). 

• If there are subtle impairments, women with ADHD may be 

more affected. 

• Memory and attention functions may be improved by 

motherhood.

 Perinatal rats show improved spatial learning compared to age‐matched 

nulliparous female rats (better at finding food in the wild!). 

 In humans, brain imaging shows increased gray matter volume in 

prefrontal cortex, parietal lobes, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, and  amygdala at 3‐4 months postpartum as compared to 2‐4 weeks  postpartum.  Positive maternal perceptions of the newborn predict these  increases. © 2021 Postpartum Support International https://www.postpartum.net/

107

Perinatal Use of Stimulants • Data are limited; most studies have confounds including comorbidities and 

other medication exposures. 

• Possible increased risks of preeclampsia, preterm birth, low birth weight, fetal 

hypoxia, seizures, neonatal intensive care unit admissions and cardiovascular  malformations (the latter shown with methylphenidate but not amphetamines). 

• Absolute risks appear to be small.  • No systematic studies of long‐term neurobehavioral effects on offspring. • Stimulants can reduce maternal appetite, potentially interfering with normal 

pregnancy weight gain.

• Breastfeeding babies  Methylphenidate: