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BADMINTON 101: A HANDBOOK

This Handbook contains the comprehensive training manual every reader that is ready to dive in to the world of badminton need.

TABLE OF CONTENTS TITLE PAGE............................................i TABLE OF CONTENTS.........ii NATURE....................................................2 HISTORY..................................................3 COURT DIMENSIONS...........4 EQUIPMENTS....................................5 RULES..........................................................6

BASIC SKILLS.....................................8 GRIP..................................................8 STANCE...................................9 FOOTWORK.................10 SERVE......................................11 SMASH....................................12 TACTICS & TECHNICAL

SKILLS.......................................................13 OFFICIATING..................................14 REFERENCES..............................15

BADMINTON

1

N A T U R E OF BADMINTON Badminton is played as a singles or doubles game with one or two players on a side. The object of the game is to hit the shuttlecock or “bird” back and forth with a racket across a net five feet high at its center. The bird should be hit with such speed and accuracy that the opponent is unable to return the shot successfully. The game can either be fast or slow paced, depending on the skill level of the players. Badminton places demands on the whole body, from speed to concentration and conditions to sensitivity, coordination and finesse. The game is very complex, but nevertheless, beginners can make rapid progress in their game after just a few training sessions, which is one reason why badminton is such a popular high school sport. In simple terms, the aim of the game is to place the shuttle where the opponent can no longer reach it or can only return it with difficulty.

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H I S T O R Y

3

OF BADMINTON

Badminton is an ancient sport that was played in Asia, India and China, and Europe more than 2000 years ago. In Japan, the related game Hanetsuki was played as early as the 16th century. In the west, badminton came from a game called battledore and shuttlecock, in which two or more players keep a feathered shuttlecock in the air with small rackets. The game was called "Poona" in India during the 18th century, and British Army officers stationed there took a competitive Indian version back to England in the 1860s, where it was played at country houses as an upper class amusement. Isaac Spratt, a London toy dealer, published a booklet, "Badminton Battledore - a new game" in 1860, but unfortunately no copy has survived. The new sport was definitively launched in 1873 at the Badminton House, Gloucestershire, owned by the Duke of Beaufort. During that time, the game was referred to as "The Game of Badminton," and the game's official name became Badminton. Until 1887 the sport was played in England under the rules that prevailed in India. The Bath Badminton Club standardized the rules and made the game applicable to English ideas. The basic regulations were drawn up in 1887. In 1893, the Badminton Association of England published the first set of rules according to these regulations, similar to today's rules, and officially

launched badminton in a house called "Dunbar" at 6 Waverley Grove, Portsmouth, England on September 13 of that year. They also started the All England Open Badminton Championships, the first badminton competition in the world, in 1899. The International Badminton Federation (IBF) (now known as Badminton World Federation) was established in 1934 with Canada, Denmark, England, France, the Netherlands, Ireland, New Zealand, Scotland, and Wales as its founding members. India joined as an affiliate in 1936. The BWF now governs international badminton and develops the sport globally. While originated in England, international badminton has traditionally been dominated by a few Asian countries, plus Denmark from Europe. China, Indonesia, South Korea and Malaysia are among the nations that have consistently produced worldclass players in the past few decades and dominated competitions on the international level, with China being the most dominant in recent years.

COURT DIMENSIONS

Badminton Courts are the rectangular surfaces used for the racket sport of badminton. divided in half by a center badminton net, courts are usually marked for both singles or doubles games with boundary widths varying between the two match types. Badminton courts should be surfaced with safe flooring materials for gameplay, that include wood, synthetic, and rubber flooring options. Badminton Courts have a length of 44’ (13.4 m), but double courts are 20’ (6.1 m) wide while single courts are reduced to 17’ (5.18 m); shrinking by 1.5’ (.46 m) on both sides. Service courts are split by a center line dividing the width of the court and are set back from the net by a ‘short service line’ of 6.5’ (1.98 m). Doubles games also require a ‘long service line’ that is placed 2.5’ (.76 m) in from the back boundary. Clearances of 2’ (.61 m) should be providing around the entire badminton court.

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EQUIPMENTS RACKET Badminton rackets can be made from several types of

materials. Depending on the material selection, this can

result in different combinations of racket weight,

balance points and string tensions. With so many

different combinations, it will take time to decide which

is most suited for your playing style.

SHUTTLECOCK

Plastic shuttlecocks are far more durable compared to the

feathered types which are commonly used. However, plastic

shuttlecocks are only recommended for beginners who are

just starting out. This is because feathered shuttlecocks are

expensive and fray easily especially if the wrong technique

is used. Hence, plastic shuttlecocks are good for beginners

to use for training. Plastic shuttlecocks are usually used by

young children who play badminton for recreation.

5

BADMINTON SHOES Badminton shoes are designed to give you better

traction and grip to stop in time to return a shot. They

should also be lightweight have good cushioning to

absorb impact when you jump or land. Regular players

will find heel cups useful to prolonging the lifespan of

your shoes.

BADMINTON

ATTIRE

For casual to non-competitive players, a comfortable

pair of shorts and cotton or dri-fit t-shirt is sufficient.

Some players may want to equip themselves with hand

grips, wrist bands and ankle guards. Each of these items

serve a purpose and might also add a dash of colour to

the entire get-up



R U L E S

OBJECT OF THE

GAME

The object of badminton to hit

Presentations are tools isthat the shuttlecock over the net and

can be used as demos have it land in the designated

court areas. If your opponent

manages to return the

shuttlecock then a rally occurs. If

you win this rally i.e. force your

opponent to hit the shuttlecock

out or into the net then you win a

point. You are required to win 21

points to win a set with most

matches being best of 3 sets.

Points can be won on either serve.

SCORING

WINNING THE

GAME

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To win a game you must reach 21

A point is scored when you

successfully hit the shuttlecock

over the net and land it in your

points before your opponent. If

you do so then you will have won

that set. If the scores are tied at

20-20 then it comes down to

opponent’s court before they hit

whichever player manages to get

it. A point can also be gained

two clear points ahead. If the

points are still tied at 29-29 then

when your opponent hits the

the next point will decide the

shuttlecock into either the net or

winner of the set. Winning the

outside the parameters.

overall game will require you to

win 2 out of the 3 sets played.

R U L E S A game can take place with either two (singles) or four (doubles) players. An official match has to be played indoors on the proper court dimensions. The dimensions are 6.1m by 13.4m, The net is situated through the middle of the court and is set at 1.55m. To score a point the shuttlecock must hit within the parameters of the opponents court. If the shuttlecock hits the net or lands out then a point is awarded to your opponent. Players must serve diagonally across the net to their opponent. As points are won then serving stations move from one side to the other. There are no second serves so if your first serve goes out then your opponent wins the point. A serve must be hit underarm and below the servers waist. No overarm serves are allowed. Each game will start with a toss to determine which player will serve first and which side of the court the opponent would like to start from. Once the shuttlecock is ‘live’ then a player may move around the court as they wish. They are permitted to hit the shuttlecock from out of the playing area.

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If a player touches the net with any part of their body or racket then it is deemed a fault and their opponent receives the point. A fault is also called if a player deliberately distracts their opponent, the shuttlecock is caught in the racket then flung, the shuttlecock is hit twice or if the player continues to infract with the laws of badminton. Each game is umpired by a referee on a high chair who overlooks the game. There are also line judges who monitor if the shuttlecock lands in or not. The referee has overriding calls on infringements and faults. Let may be called by the referee if an unforeseen or accidental circumstance arose. These may include the shuttlecock getting stuck in the bet, server serving out of turn, one player was not ready or a decision which is too close to call. The game has only two rest periods coming the form of a 90 second rest after the first game and a 5 minute rest period after the second game. If the laws are continuously broken by a player then the referee holds the power to dock that player of points with persisting fouls receiving a forfeit of the set or even the match.

BASIC SKILLS ON BADMINTON

G R I P The right grip in holding the racket is really important to achieve control on shots while avoiding the chances of a wrist injury. A proper grip will allow you to play both backhand and forehand strokes effortlessly. Holding a racket is similar to a friendly handshake. Just the thumb will be comfortably placed against the wider surface of the handle grip. The rest of the hand will imitate a handshake. Remember to keep the handshake friendly, avoiding a tight grip. It will hinder the flexibility in motion and also might lead to wrist injuries in the long term.

T Y P E S

8

BASIC SKILLS ON BADMINTON

S T A N C E

The stance is how you stand while playing badminton, both in between a rally and before the serve. A stable and correct stance will bring a huge change in the results due to easier movement.

K I N D S

ATTACKING

It is used to get into position

before playing an overhead

forehand stroke. To stand in the

attacking stance turn your body

facing the sidelines with the

racket leg behind and both legs

shoulder-width apart. Now

raise both racket and non-

racket arms to generate the

power to attack the shuttle on

its downward trajectory.

DEFENSIVE To defend the opponent’s

smash, you need to be

prepared with a defensive

stance. Face the body to the

net and place your racket in

front at waist height, slightly

pointing forward. You can

keep the non-racket arm

comfortable while ensuring a

better balance.

NET This stance is to be ready for

the opponent’s return after

playing a net shot. To play

this shot, place your foot on

the racket side forward while

keeping a non-racket foot at

the back. Place the racket in

front of the body, slightly

above waist height while

raising the non-racket arm.

Shift the body weight slightly

forward to be ready to pounce

forward.

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BASIC SKILLS ON BADMINTON

F O O T W O R K Badminton is played on a badminton court with limited space, and the

athletes have to take care of the same while playing. Footwork plays a huge role in helping with an effective and organized movement on the court. In fact, some coaches even raise footwork to prime importance over other skills.

TIPS FOR PROPER FOOTWORK ALWAYS REMEMBER THE BASE (STARTING POINT). MOVE ONLY 2-3 STEPS BACKWARD. SHUFFLE ONLY 1 STEP SIDEWARDS. MOVE ONLY 2-3 STEPS FRONT.

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BASIC SKILLS ON BADMINTON

S E R V E

Service is among the most basic skill that you need to master in Badminton. Also, you should ensure to make a legal service otherwise it might lead to penalty points.

TYPES HIGH High serve aims at the back-end corner of the

opponent’s court. Ideally, a good high serve

results in the shuttle dropping steeply

downwards at the back end of the court. In

fact, a high serve is presented to opponents

having the ability to executing a strong

smash. You can always expect a lob or a drop

from your opponent as a reply to a properly

executed high serve.

LOW Unlike high serve, the low serve aims to the

front of the court. The objective is to let the

shuttle fly just above the net landing in the

front corner of the court. In this case, your

opponent has the opportunity to dash

forward and smash the shuttle to you if the

execution is poor.

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BASIC SKILLS ON BADMINTON

S M A S H

Smash is the most potent and powerful stroke in badminton which naturally turns out to be the most familiar term to all. The shot is basically to hit the shuttle powerfully towards the opponent’s body or downward on the court. A perfectly executed smash has no defense. This badminton skill is the most aggressive and technical one.

FOREHAND

The forehand is an overhead

smash which is similar to the action of throwing a ball. You

shouldn’t have a problem

playing this stroke if you can

throw a ball well. This skill in

badminton acts as a game-

changer for beginners.

T Y P E S This is one of the toughest

strokes in badminton, and even

experts face difficulty in

playing the stroke. Still, it is

important to practice and get

the technique to rise in the skill

level. To execute this stroke,

getting the backhand grip is

extremely important. Also, it is

equally important to return

back to stance. Backhand

smash skill in badminton

requires years of practice and

consistency.

BACKHAND

JUMPING

A forehand smash with a

timed jump added to it

counts under jumping

smash. This skill in

badminton is the most

glamorous of all.

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TACTICS AND

TECHNICAL SKILLS S I N G L E S

You have to make a situation in which your opponent faces

difficulty to reach and hit the shuttle back to you; subsequently you

may win a point. It will be possible when you hit the shuttle from the corner of the

playing area, keeping in mind the position of your opponent. If he is near the net, hit a powerful overhead shot that goes in the

back of the court. And, if he is in the back of the court, play a

delicate net shot that just crosses the net and falls in front of your

opponent. You must have the knowledge of each and every part of the service

court so that you can play effectively and take an ideal position; in the center of the court. Serving tactics are also important. They are used to serve the

shuttle, in a way, that makes the serve fairly difficult for an

opponent to reply.

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D O U B L E S 1). Attacking tactics (For scoring points): As we know, for playing

doubles, we need teamwork. In doubles, mutual understanding is

very important for both; you and your team-mate. When you start

attacking with a powerful shot, you and your team-mate must take

front and back position. - It means, one player takes position in the back of the court and

the other player takes the front of the court. In doubles, attacking

tactic is used when back court player strikes the drop shot or smash

shot. There are lots of possibilities of sending the shuttle back to

opponents. -If your opponent plays a returning flick shot, the back court

player can play attacking shots easily. If your opponent hits the

shuttle to the mid court, the front court player may play a shot which

will create difficulty for opponent to respond. - If a team has a chance to attack first, will have more chance to

score points and win. Therefore, you and your team-mate must be a

powerful attacking player and do not pave the way for your

opponent to attack. 2). Defending tactics (For saving points): When you are defending,

you and your team-mate must take side by side positions so that

both of you may cover the whole court. You are to be ready before

your opponent starts attacking you.

OFFICIATING THE GAME

Badminton is one of the best recreational sports nowadays. It is very economical

and can be played by people of all ages and varying skills and levels. It

enjoyable game for beginners but at the same time, can be an exciting game

that requires stamina, speed, cleverness, and agility. In playing badminton,

game officials are needed to be in full control of the match. Good officiating

brings out the best in the playing ability of each player, while poor officiating

can easily ruin the game.

R E F E R E E

A referee can be held liable for any incident during the play. For this reason, he has to make sure the players receive proper facilities during the tournaments He prepares players ‘ practice sessions and schedules. He also has to take care of the players ‘ play conditions A referee has to make sure the equipment is up to the BWF’s level. He must also ensure that everyone follows the rules of health and safety, as well as other sports laws. A referee has the responsibility for delivering a proper match schedule. A referee also sets the order of play before badminton matches begin. He is also tasked with the responsibility to make modifications to the badminton game schedules and re-schedule for the play in case of a draw. He also liaises with the umpires and other officials about the matches and tournaments. A referee also coordinates with the badminton coaches and teams. A referee is also charged with the responsibility is to produce a full tournament report

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OTHER OFFICIALS Every court has 10 line jurors, who determine whether the shuttle is in or out. In front of them, they lift one of their forearms for “in,” and stretch their arms to mean “out” (precisely like “wide” in cricket). Then there is a service magistrate who calls if they serve a mistake. This occurs when the player goes beyond the service line, or when their racket is above the waste while serving. Then there’s an umpire on the field, who’s the ultimate boss. They keep announcing the score, asking you when the shuttle changes hands and stopping the players from loitering around and holding the game together. The line judges and the service judge are meant to assist the umpire, and the umpire may ignore the call of the judges even though they never do so. If the player contests the umpire’s decision or a line judge, then there is also an umpire from the IRS who checks and judges the match on a screen. Finally, there is a badminton official who, unlike other sports, is virtually never on the court. A referee handles the entire tournament. They are naming umpires, arranging matches, and ensuring the equipment is up to standard.

REFERENCES HTTPS://WWW.BBC.CO.UK/BITESIZE/GUIDES/ZP9CK7H /REVISION/1 HTTPS://WWW.THEBURNINGOFROME.COM/BLOG/WH AT-IS-THE-NATURE-AND-BACKGROUND-OFBADMINTON/ HTTPS://WWW.BADMINTONWA.ORG.AU/WHEREPLAY/ABOUT-GAME HTTPS://WWW.DIMENSIONS.COM/ELEMENT/BADMINT ONCOURT#:~:TEXT=BADMINTON%20COURTS%20HAVE %20A%20LENGTH,46%20M)%20ON%20BOTH%20 SIDES. HTTPS://WWW.MYACTIVESG.COM/SPORTS/BADMINT ON/HOW-TO-PLAY/BADMINTONEQUIPMENT/GETTING-STARTED-FOR-A-GAME-OFBADMINTON SOURCE IMAGE: GOOGLE IMAGES

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HTTPS://WWW.RULESOFSPORT.COM/SPORTS/BADMI NTON.HTML HTTPS://WWW.HEALTHYPRINCIPLES.CO.UK/BASICBADMINTON-SKILLS/ GOOGLE HTTPS://WWW.KREEDON.COM/BASIC-BADMINTONSKILLS/?AMP HTTPS://WWW.BGBADMINTON.COM/BADMINTONTECHNIQUES-LIFE-BADMINTON/ HTTPS://DEARBADMINTON.COM/BADMINTONSKILLS-TACTICS/ HTTPS://BADMINTONBITES.COM/WHAT-TYPE-OFSHOTS-ARE-IN-BADMINTON-WITH-19-EXAMPLES/ HTTPS://BADMINTONISGREAT.COM/BADMINTONOFFICIALS/ HTTPS://WWW.BADMINTONPASSION.COM/BADMINT ON-REFEREES/

BADMINTON 101: A HANDBOOK

SUBMITTED BY: CHARLENE C. BANDA 11 STEM- ALBERT EINSTEIN SUBMITTED TO: MA'AM GRACE PEDIONGCO