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HUMANITARIAN GRANTS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM IN RESPONSE TO COVID-19 (2020) Evaluation Report

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Table of Contents Acronyms 3 Executive Summary

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Evaluation Criteria

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Key Findings

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Way Forward

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Introduction 11 Background 13 Grantmaking Process

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Objectives 15

Methodology 16 Findings 17 Relevance 19 Effectiveness and Efficiency

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Impact 24 Knowledge Generation

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Lessons Learned

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Program Design, Monitoring, and Implementation

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Vulnerabilities Amplified

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Importance of Stakeholders

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Recommendations 29 Program Design, Monitoring, and Implementation

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Funding 29 Enabling Environment

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Annex 1: Cross-sections Reached Through Grants Program

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Annex 2: SOGIESC Community Reached Through Grants Program 32

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Acronyms COVID-19 Coronavirus disease of 2019

GPP Global Philanthropy Project

HAART Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

HIV Human Immunodeficiency Virus

IATT Interagency Task Team

IDAHOBIT International Day Against Homophobia Biphobia and Transphobia

OHCHR United Nations Office of the High Commisioner

PLHIV Person Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

SOGIESC Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Expression, and Sex

UN United Nations

UNGA United Nations General Assembly

WHO World Health Organization

YKPs Young Key Populations

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Executive Summary Since the onset of the CoronaVirus Disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, disproportionate and widespread social, economic, and psychological impact on the LGBTIQ people have been reported.1 Within the LGBTIQ community, the negative impacts of the pandemic and measures taken to stop its spread were amplified by disability, age, ethnicity/race, sex, indigenous or minority status, caste, property ownership, health status, national origin, urban/rural location, and other socially embedded hierarchies. With the failure to respect and uphold right to life obligations of LGBTIQ people, several grantees mentioned that lacking measures adopted by States to comply with principles of equality and non-discrimination, inclusion, and accountability made LGBTIQ people in the Asian region vulnerable during these unprecedented times. To fill the gaps left by States, several LGBTIQ organizations across Asia reported taking up additional work to address the humanitarian needs of their community. Additionally, due to non-inclusion of LGBTIQ community as at-risk population by major donors and top recipients of COVID-19 humanitarian funds, many LGBTIQ organizations reported struggles to secure needed funding (See Figure 1), making it extremely difficult for organizations to meet the immediate needs of the community that faced rising food and shelter insecurity, devastation of livelihood, disruption in access to health care, elevated risk of family or domestic violence, myriad forms of social, economic and institutional exclusions, violence, scapegoating, and discrimination.2 Acknowledging the needs of the community, in April 2020

1 Human Rights Campaign & psb. (n.d.). The Economic Impact of COVID-19 on the LGBTQ Community. HRC. Retrieved March 4, 2021, from https://www.hrc.org/resources/the-economicimpact-of-covid-19-on-the-lgbtq-community; Safer World. (2020, August 20). “I was not worried about COVID-19... only my next meal.” https://www.saferworld.org.uk/resources/news-and-analysis/ post/895-ai-was-not-worried-about-covid-19-only-my-next-meala-how-covid-19-is-affectinglgbti-communities-in-nepal; The World Bank. (2020, May 15). El estigma no está en cuarentena: ¿cuál es el impacto de la covid-19 en la comunidad LGBTI? World Bank. https://www.worldbank.org/ en/news/feature/2020/05/15/estigma-cuarentena-covid-lgbti; ILGA Asia. (2020, July 2). Impact on mental health and quality of life in time of COVID-19 for YKP and YPLHIV. https://www.ilgaasia.org/ news/2020/7/2/impact-on-mental-health-and-quality-of-life-in-time-of-covid-19-for-ykp-andyplhiv 2 Council of Europe. (2020, June 29). COVID-19: The suffering and resilience of LGBT persons must be visible and inform the actions of States. Commissioner for Human Rights. https://www. coe.int/en/web/commissioner/-/covid-19-the-suffering-and-resilience-of-lgbt-persons-mustbe-visible- and-inform-the-actions-of-states; Global Philanthropy Project. (2021). WHERE ARE THE GLOBAL COVID-19 RESOURCES FOR LGBTI COMMUNITIES? https://globalphilanthropyproject.org/ wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Mapping-COVID-Report-2021-Final-1.21.21.pdf

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ILGA Asia spearheaded a campaign with an objective to alleviate the pains felt by LGBTIQ people across the Asian region by releasing USD 43,666 in humanitarian grants. A total of eighteen member organizations in eleven (11) countries benefited from ILGA Asia’s Humanitarian Grants Assistance Program, and the amount of grant ranged from USD 2,066 to USD 2,500 (see Figure 2 and Table 1 for a complete breakdown by country).3

Figure 1. ILGA Asia and other donors in USD

3 Numbers in Figure 1 denotes funds received by 10 LGBTIQ+ organizations from Asia as of April 2020.

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Figure 2. Grants receiving countries

Evaluation Criteria The evaluation of this report is based on four key areas: Relevance, Effectiveness and Efficiency, Impact, and Knowledge Generation. These key areas were measured against the end-line report submitted by grantees, and the following summarizes findings in this report.

Relevance Prioritizing local needs and recognizing expertise of in-country organizations to fully understand domestic problems, ILGA Asia followed the lead of grantees to develop intervention activities, which ranged from online and in-person counselling services to online group activities on mental health, violence, parentchild relationship; from cash assistance for food and housing to temporary shelter provisions; from CD4 testing assistance to distribution of ART medicine, IEC materials to raise awareness about CoronaVirus Disease of 2019 (COVID-19) and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) (see Table 2 for a detailed list of intervention activities by country). Assessing relevance based on the extent to which the program and its intervention activities were suited to local priorities and their needs, as well as growing unmet needs of the community due to lack of support from respective governments to address those need and dearth of funds made available to LGBTIQ organizations, this program was found to be of high relevance. 6

Effectiveness and Efficiency Several risks and barriers to successfully implement grants assistance were identified by grantees during the initial assessment period. While challenges to implement programs were country- and program-specific, a majority of grantees were prepared to take countermeasures to appropriately handle any expected or anticipated challenges by making use of relevant stakeholders and networks. It was also revealed that grantees that thoroughly assessed expected or anticipated challenges were better prepared to work around barriers than those who were not able to assess them as thoroughly. For grantees who were not able to assess risks, the implementation activities provided key insights into the community, which will be useful for future intervention activities. Measuring successful program implementation in the allocated time against the end-line reports and ingenious countermeasures taken by grantees to effectively handle challenges, the efficiency of the grants assistance program was found to be high.

Figure 3. Beneficiaries by SOGIESC.

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Figure 4. Beneficiaries by marginalized status.

Impact Reaching 117 cities in eleven countries, 8,863 individuals directly and 72,206 individuals indirectly benefited from this program. This program was highly effective reaching its objective of supporting diverse groups within the LGBTIQ community that were in dire need for immediate assistance. Disaggregated data by sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) reveal that the humanitarian grants reached a wide sub-section of the community (See Figure 3; for complete breakdown see Annex 2). Additionally, as shown in Figure 4, humanitarian grants were able to reach a wide sub-section of the community that were identified by ILGA Asia as most vulnerable within the LGBTIQ community. Meeting the objectives of this grants program to successfully reach and provide short-term reliefs to diverse groups within the LGBTIQ community and identified vulnerable groups within the community, assessment of end-line reports suggest that the impact of this Humanitarian Grants Assistance Program was high.

Knowledge Generation End-line reports reveal that there is an acute need for capacity development amongst grantees such as community mapping, relevant resource development, including human resource development. Further, there is also a need for technical knowledge on financial management, community organizing, 8

and proposal writing skills amongst grantees. As the impact of the pandemic is ongoing and evolving, most grantees underscored the need for long-term funding to assist LGBTIQ communities. They also highlighted a need for ILGA Asia to play a pivotal role in information dissemination on COVID-19 related funds and serve as a link between them and donors.

Key Findings 1. Program Design, Monitoring, and Implementation: ILGA Asia’s Humanitarian Grants Assistance Program rolled out with the belief that grantees are more knowledgeable to solve local challenges and have the expertise to correctly address local challenges, best positioning them to set their own priorities. Much of the success of this program was due in part to this bottom-up approach used throughout the designing, monitoring, and implementation phases. As a sociopolitically, economically, and culturally diverse region, this approach further allowed ILGA Asia to show greater flexibility to cater to the needs of LGBTIQ people, as well as identified-vulnerable groups in different countries within the region.

Highlighting the lack of capacities of grantees operating within the region, it was observed that some of them lack a breadth of knowledge of the LGBTIQ community. While this was due in part to the unprecedented nature of impact, the implementation period provided opportunities to generate key insights about the community. Other findings that this report highlights are the need to generate disaggregated data on structures that amplify vulnerabilities of LGBTIQ people.

2. Vulnerabilities Amplified: It was observed that LGBTIQ people holding precarious jobs in the informal sector faced severe economic impacts due to devastation of livelihood generation activities, leading to food and housing insecurities, and lockdown measures impacted mental health of LGBTIQ people, especially young LGBTIQ individuals. As the pandemic is ongoing, the evolving impact is wreaking havoc on LGBTIQ community, enveloping various marginalized groups from the community into its fold.

Way Forward 9

1. Program Design, Monitoring, and Implementation: As the impact of the pandemic is heightened by one’s marginalized status, priorities to disaggregate data on socio-economic, political, and cultural marginalization should be established to prevent further marginalization of vulnerable groups during these trying times. Additionally, as the impact of the pandemic is ongoing and, evolving so are the needs of LGBTIQ people. Taking heed to this reality, grants should be designed and released in phases to adequately address the long-term impact the pandemic is having on the LGBTIQ community. 2. Funding: As glaringly obvious, limited funds were made available to LGBTIQ organizations by donors and recipients of COVID-19 humanitarian response funding. This harsh reality that had multitudinal ramifications of local organizations and their ability to provide crucial services to deeply impacted and often excluded communities, should be raised as a serious issue at international fora. Furthermore, mandating the addition of LGBTIQ people as at-risk population in times of crisis should be prioritized with an aim to leverage inclusion of LGBTIQ community in intervention plans of donors and recipients of humanitarian grants.

Simultaneously, as this report shows an abject lack of technical skills and capacities of grantees, constraining them to write complex proposals, perform several donor-mandated paperworks and other duties, ILGA Asia should persuade donors to strengthen those capabilities of LGBTIQ organizations through core funding.



Correlation between economic conditions of a country, it social safety net and negative impact on the community was observed, indicating a need for positive discrimination in selection of grantees based on those realities.

3. Enabling Environment: It was observed that targeted intervention activities are vital and effective ways to aid the most impacted population, thus community mapping and assessment based on intersectional approach is determined. Further, it was observed that the role of stakeholders in times of crisis are heightened; thus, maintenance of good relationships with diverse range of stakeholders and investment in coalition building is pertinent. 10

Introduction On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced the COVID-19 outbreak, a global pandemic. Worldwide, emergency measures taken to control the pandemic exacerbated inequalities and discriminations, prompting the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) to acknowledge that “the poorest and most vulnerable are the hardest hit by the pandemic.”4 Crises of the past have shown that emergencies tend to exacerbate vulnerabilities of LGBTIQ people due to higher levels of violence, exclusion, deprivation, stigma and discrimination. A report submitted by Victor Madrigal-Borloz, Independent Expert on sexual orientation and gender identity to the United Nations Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner (OHCHR) highlighted that COVID-19 had a disproportionate impact on the LGBTIQ individuals and the response to the pandemic exacerbates social exclusion and violence already faced by the community.5 On the eve of International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia (IDAHOBIT), on 17 May 2020, a group United Nations (UN) and human rights experts released a joint statement calling on states and stakeholders to urgently take into account the impact of COVID-19 on the SOGIESC minority.6 The joint statement warned that the pandemic has created a conducive environment for persecution of LGBTIQ individuals and some States have already taken measures to persecute them under the guise of public health. Despite formal acknowledgements and warnings on the increased risks and further marginalization of the LGBTIQ community by prominent organizations, exclusion of the community as at-risk population under present conditions by leading donor organizations and recipients of COVID-19 humanitarian assistance funds in response to COVID-19, remain prevalent. A recent report by the Global Philanthropy Project (GPP) found that as of 11 November 2020, top five

4 OHCHR | Report on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the human rights of LGBT persons. (2020, July 28). www.ohchr.org. https://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/SexualOrientationGender/ Pages/COVID19Report.aspx 5 United Nations General Assembly, & Madrigal-Borloz, V. (2020, July). Protection against violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. https://undocs. org/A/75/258 6 Council of Europe. (2020, June 29). COVID-19: The suffering and resilience of LGBT persons must be visible and inform the actions of States. Commissioner for Human Rights. https://www. coe.int/en/web/commissioner/-/covid-19-the-suffering-and-resilience-of-lgbt-persons-must-bevisible- and-inform-the-actions-of-states

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donors and top 20 recipients of COVID-19 humanitarian response funding lacked explicit inclusion of LGBTIQ communities as a priority population.7 The lack of inclusion and thereby of funds made available to respond to hardships created by the pandemic had serious ramifications on LGBTIQ organizations that provide critical services to the community. Under pressure to address the communities’ immediate needs, several LGBTIQ organizations in Asia found themselves overworked and stretched to fill the gaps left by the State. Moreover, most organizations provided critical services to the community under limited budgets, sourcing funds from a handful of small donors. The dearth of funds and support at the disposal of LGBTIQ organizations to provide crucial services to the community during these unprecedented times has amplified the vulnerabilities of LGBTIQ individuals further, and subsequently rendered most global humanitarian assistance efforts to fight against the impact of the pandemic non-inclusive. Furthermore, as the impact of the pandemic on the LGBTIQ individuals are heightened and compounded by disability, age, ethnicity/race, sex, indigenous or minority status, caste, property ownership, health status, national origin, urban/ rural location, and other socially embedded hierarchies, many LGBTIQ individuals with intersecting marginalities are suffering even more. Without acknowledgement of these crosssections, assistance programs have a lesser chance of being comprehensive, as well as less successful at providing needed services to the entire community. For LGBTIQ individuals, extreme dependence on precarious jobs in the informal sectors have also exacerbated their economic vulnerability and limited their access to basic necessities. The subsequent government-ordered lockdowns and/or measures taken by respective governments to control the spread of the virus has increased the risks faced by LGBTIQ people to fall into extreme poverty. Additionally, studies show that many in the community have been mentally affected since the outbreak due to increased instances of violence, escalation of social exclusions, and prolonged exposure to unaccepting family members. A rapid survey launched by The Interagency Task Team (IATT) on Young Key Populations (YKPs) in Asia and the Pacific found that 70% of respondents felt anxious or extremely anxious about 7 Global Philanthropy Project. (2021). WHERE ARE THE GLOBAL COVID-19 RESOURCES FOR LGBTI COMMUNITIES? https://globalphilanthropyproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/MappingCOVID-Report-2021-Final-1.21.21.pdf

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COVID-19, with 82% of young people stating concerns about their own health, 71% stating concerns about family members’ health, and 59% stating loss of income as reasons for feeling that way.8 The study also found that 34% experienced delays or disruption in access to mental health medications due to COVID-19 and 47% experienced delays or disruption in accessing psychosocial support as a result of the pandemic.9

Background In April 2020, ILGA Asia held its first assessment meeting with member organizations to gauge the impact of the pandemic on the LGBTIQ community. The assessment and follow-up consultation meetings revealed that the impact of the pandemic in the Asia region is widespread and wideranging. Consultation meetings revealed that LGBTIQ organizations across countries were also concerned about their organizational survival during these times due to slowdowns or stoppages in critical advocacy work such as strategic litigation and provision to support their community. To alleviate the pains felt by the community, ILGA Asia released USD 43,666 in humanitarian grants. Based on the consultation, ILGA Asia provided humanitarian grants to 18 LGBTIQ member organizations in 11 different countries that provided following critical aids or services:



Safe shelter for LGBTIQ people who are evicted from their home;

• • •

Food for those who have lost incomes;



Delivery of medications and health related services, including HIV medications;



Emergency legal support in cases of human rights violation;

Masks and sanitizers; Self-care and wellbeing services, including counseling and psycho-social support for those who are undergoing distress;

8 ILGA Asia. (2020, July 2). Impact on mental health and quality of life in time of COVID-19 for YKP and YPLHIV. https://www.ilgaasia.org/news/2020/7/2/impact-on-mental-health-and-quality-oflife-in-time-of-covid-19-for-ykp-and-yplhiv 9 Ibid.

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Dissemination of information in local languages and languages used by migrant workers;



Income for community workers who have lost their job due to cut in funding.

Grantmaking Process A total of 25 organizations across Asia applied to ILGA Asia’s Humanitarian Grants Assistance Program in response to COVID-19 call. For the selection process, a scoring matrix was designed with seven key areas. Proposals from member organizations were evaluated against key areas by the ILGA Asia team and organizations that scored the highest were awarded the humanitarian grant. The key seven areas on which the final decision was made were: i.

Application targets trans or intersex people, sex workers, youths, homeless people, or those with critical medical health needs;

ii.

Critical state of the target group’s situation is caused by COVID-19 and needs immediate attention and/or remedies;

iii.

Proposed activities directly solve the problems facing the target group;

iv.

The proposed activities do no harm to the target group or any other group;

v.

The applicant shows capacity to deliver the proposed activities;

vi.

The applicant shows clear understanding of the risks and offers concrete countermeasures;

vii. The applicant successfully convinces that there will be no corruption and no misuse of grant money. Matching the requests made in respective proposals, a total of 18 LGBTIQ member organizations in eleven countries received grants. Table 1 shows humanitarian grants received by 18 grantees, covering eleven countries:

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S. No

Country

Funds in USD

1

Vietnam

5000

2

India

7500

3

Pakistan

6700

4

Philppines

5000

5

Lebanon

5000

6

Mongolia

2500

7

Nepal

2400

8

Iran

2500

9

China

2500

10

Singapore

2066

11

Malaysia

2500

Table 1. Total grant receiving by country.

Grantees provided critical services to the LGBTIQ community who faced economic hardship, violence, and social and other forms of exclusions. As the socio-political structures, economic advancements and legal frameworks of the Asian region are diverse, the nature of impact of the pandemic on LGBTIQ people varied widely. Considering this diversity, each assistance program was appropriately designed and implemented by grantees between the period of June to October, 2020. Further, as the impact of the pandemic on LGBTIQ people is evolving, some intervention activities also evolved and differed from the initial proposals sent by applicants to cater to the needs of the community.

Objectives Identifying the need to evaluate the impact of the Humanitarian Grants Assistance Program in response to COVID-19, its benefits to the community and member organizations, and aspects to include in future intervention programs, the followings are the objectives of this report: 1.

To understand the effects of COVID-19 on the work of members, how they are adapting the changing situation and support system they can access.

2.

To measure the impacts of ILGA Asia’s Humanitarian Grants on the members, beneficiaries and broader community.

3.

To propose strategic recommendations based on key lessons learned, challenges and the flexibility to adapt and respond to the changes in the context of COVID-19 and similar crises. 15

Methodology By the end of the program, grantees were requested to submit an online survey. Key questions were asked in the survey to measure the success of this program and ways to improve future intervention programs. The evaluation process was conducted virtually and relied on the end-line reports sent by grantees, which included both qualitative and quantitative data. A total of 18 grantees were benefited from the humanitarian grants, covering eleven countries of which 17 submitted end-line reports. Those 17 organizations were able to provide short-term reliefs to LGBTIQ individuals in the program duration, which ran from July 2020 to October 2020 (see Table 2 for activities by country). Following desk analysis of end-line reports, four areas were identified with set goals to perform analysis of ILGA Asia’s Humanitarian Grants.

Goals

Area Relevance

The extent to which the program and its interventions and activities are suited to local priorities and needs.

Effectiveness and Efficiency

The effectiveness of this humanitarian grant is defined as the extent to which its objective has been achieved vis-à-vis measures taken to prevent corruption. The efficiency is defined as the extent to which results have been delivered vis-à-vis anticipated and unanticipated risks that were maneuvered.

Knowledge Generation

To evaluate impacts of the grants.

Impact

To evaluate ways to strengthen future intervention grants, key challenges faced, and lessons learned from current intervention grants.

The first version of this evaluation report, including the findings was submitted to grantees for verification on 18 February 2021. Welcoming grantees to reflect and provide feedback on all aspects of this report, including lessons learned and recommendation sections of this report, appropriate comments are addressed and incorporated in this final version. Limitations: As with any evaluation of intervention programs aiming to address wide-scale and wide-ranging impacts, this evaluation report faces several constraints to fully grasp the 16

real impact. Specific challenges included: giving appropriate weight to multiple perspectives; connecting ambiguous linkages; and getting necessary feedback on key sections such as Lessons Learned and Recommendation, due to time constraints faced by overstretched LGBTIQ organizations in the Asian region. These challenges were solved, for the most part, by the help ILGA Asia team, who provided missing linkages and data.

Findings The principal component of the humanitarian grant program was the local level interventions. Each member organization evaluated the needs of the community and targeted demographics within the community. Table 2 below lists the activities carried out by member organizations: S. No.

Country

Activities Psychosocial counseling services

1

Iran

Cash assistance for housing, education, livelihood establishment, medicines and hospitalization Food distribution.

2

India

Distribution of pain medications. Livelihood support by providing monetary aid to establish small mobile shops.

3

Nepal

4

Pakistan

5

China

Cash-for-food assistance. Food distribution. PPE distribution. Online learning activities and group discussions on mental health, violence, parent-child relationship, discrimination and stigma. Creative conversations to share stories and build support.

6

Lebanon

Food distribution.

17

Food distribution. Financial support to buy Medicine. 7

India

PLHIV support purchase of ART medicines and financial help to perform CD4 testing. Financial support to perform COVID-19 PCR test. Financial support for rent payment. Conduct survey of LGBTIQ community and service providers on the mental health issues faced by LGBTIQ people in Vietnam.

8

Vietnam

Prepare guidelines on proper ways/channels to access mental health issues for LGBTIQ people and for service providers on how to properly deal with challenges faced by them while providing services. Gather feedback from the LGBTIQ community and service providers to incorporate in future versions of guidelines for targeted demographics. Food distribution.

9

Vietnam

Financial assistant to support income generation activities, to cover living cost and to purchase medicine. Development and distribution of IEC materials to raise awareness regarding the pandemic. Procurement and distribution of PPEs.

10

Pakistan

Outreach in under-served areas about COVID-19. Food distribution. Psycho-social counselling to people facing mental health problems. Food distribution. Hygiene supply distribution. Temporary shelter provision.

11

Mongolia

Sports event. Group meet-ups. Prepaid cell phone calling cards for data and minutes. Provided financial support to cover for hospital charges incurred by two transgender woman with second degree burn.

12

Lebanon

13

Singapore

Cash-for-food assistance. Mental health counseling. Counseling services.

18

Cash assistance to transgender men. 14

Philippines

Documentation of COVID-19 related situation of transmen regarding their living condition, health and access to health services. Mental and emotional support to transmen.

15

Malaysia

Registration with healthcare providers. Purchase and distribution of ART. Food distribution.

16

PPE distribution.

India

Distribution of Vitamins and immune boosters. Financial support to make up for lost income.

17

Philippines

HIV self-test kits distribution and counseling services. Food distribution.

18

Pakistan

PPE distribution. Development and distribution awareness raising pamphlets regarding COVID-19. Table 2. Activities carried out by grantees.

Relevance The relevance of the Humanitarian Grant is assessed based on the extent to which the program and its interventions and activities are suited to local priorities and needs. Furthermore, relevance is also assessed by determining how the project relates to the main objectives of the humanitarian grant. As the impact of the pandemic was sweeping, it impacted several aspects of LGBTIQ people across Asia. It affected their mental health, exacerbated their economic vulnerabilities, heightened isolation and social exclusions, increased discrimination and elevated incidence of violence. Initial assessment documents reveal that the impact of the pandemic and measures taken by respective governments to control it had an acute impact on the LGBTIQ community, as well as organizations that provide critical services to the community on many fronts. Speaking on economic marginalization, a trans activist from Vietnam who runs a drag show business said, “All shows are cancelled, we are going to be starving!” A trans-led organization in Pakistan reported. “Most of the transgender community, sex workers don’t have source

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of income even before lockdown situation they were involved in begging …facing huge financial challenges they don’t have money to even buy basic needs and bread and butter for their survival …”10

Reporting isolation and family violence against LGBTIQ people, and further stigmatization of the community, from Mongolia noted, ...Due to COVID-19, there is increased violence at home; which in most cases led youth to run away and/or being kicked out ...some are even being blamed for spreading COVID-19 at home. Often youth are outed at home, they are separated from their siblings and this has a tremendous effects [sic] on the youths’ psychics...

Similarly, noting family violence against LGBTIQ people and worsening mental health of the community during the pandemic, a student-led organization in China reported “As a result of isolation and epidemic prevention at home, many LGBT youth had to live with homophobic families. Confinement in a small family environment without support increases their risk of domestic violence and anxiety and depression… Due to the suspension of classes and work, they did not come out and faced with [sic] the long-term family-parent relationship leading to anxiety, domestic violence, and lack of peer talk.11 Furthermore, at the time of the initial assessment only ten grantees reported having received funds from donors other than ILGA Asia, totaling USD 25,800. Acute lack of funds prior to ILGA Asia’s intervention, highlights the importance of this humanitarian grant. The USD 43,666 provided by ILGA Asia, meant that organizations could provide much needed support to the community in these unprecedented times. As the overall arching objective of the humanitarian grant was to provide needed services to the LGBTIQ community through member organizations, the humanitarian grant provided by ILGA Asia was of high relevance to the community and grantees.

Effectiveness and Efficiency The effectiveness of this humanitarian grant is defined as the extent to which its objective has been achieved vis-à-vis measures taken to prevent corruption and efficiency is defined as the extent to which results have been delivered vis-à-vis 10 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 31 August 2020 11 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 30 September 2020

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anticipated and unanticipated risks that were maneuvered. Initial assessment reports show a varied level of emerging need and risks associated with intervention activities. Many organizations were uncertain how the situation would unfold when they first sent their proposal, but overall it was found that they had countermeasures in case things took the wrong turn. Challenges to successfully run intervention activities were country- and program-specific. A trans-led organization that operates in Pakistan stated, “To receive foreign remittance in [sic] organization account on time can be a challenge as economic affair [sic] division has imposed the restriction on NGOs account [sic] to get into force surveillance system on NGOs and community based organizations.”12

An organization from Lebanon reported, ...Limited mobility of participants from refugee communities due to their expired travel documents/ residency permits …Roadblocks and riots due to political and financial reasons...13

As organizations had to continue their advocacy role and take up humanitarian work, they found themselves stretched. Speaking on risks imposed by overwhelming workload, a grant recipient from Vietnam reported ...the group of therapists might not have time to participate fully in the project due to their workload and high demand.14

Faced with tremendous workload, need of the community, and uncertainty an HIV foundation from Malaysia noted that they might have to close their office if lock-down and measures taken to control the virus continue. In regards to uncertainty, another grantee reported Locked downs, our reach to clients as most of the areas are sealed again due to COVID situation in Pakistan which is very bad.15

As a backup plan to deal with any risks, they were ready to engage with law enforcement agencies and use a letter of authority they had procured, to continue their critical work. 12 13 14 15

ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 30 September 2020 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 30 September 2020 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 30 September 2020 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 17 October 2020

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Utilizing field networks and building up on relations with stakeholders with appropriate measures, several grantees reported that they were prepared to deal with anticipated risks. An LGBTIQ group that operates in Southern India reported …with respect to ensuring arrangement of temporary shelter, we may encounter challenges in securing permissions for the same.16

With years of field experience and good relations with stakeholders, when asked what countermeasures they will take or have, the organization confidently responded Over the years, we have been working with government officials to highlight the importance of temporary shelter for such individuals who are not safe in their domestic homes. We are hoping to scale up our advocacy by building a coalition of other civil society organizations in this regard. 17

End-line reports reveal that many grantees had anticipated most risks, while a few others faced minor glitches. Furthermore, thorough assessment directly also correlated with grantees being able to run activities smoothly. An LGBTIQ organization in Nepal reported, The project went smoothly as per plan and proposal. So, we didn’t face any risks and challenges.18

Similarly, an LGBTIQ organization from India noted, Our relief teams on the ground were able to provide aid on time and did not face any difficulties. This was possible because the Government of India has lifted lockdown restrictions and introduced new unlock guidelines.19

A trans men’s organization in the Philippines had assessed distribution as an anticipated risk in their proposal, and during the implantation stage they faced the same problem. However, as the grantee was prepared for anticipated risk, they managed to deal with the problem successfully. Although one of the organizations based out of Pakistan did not include risks they faced in the field in their risk assessment, their intervention activities included measures to solve those risks they faced during implementation, as well as unanticipated risks. They reported that they faced challenges 16 17 18 19

ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 30 August 2020 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 30 August 2020 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 20 August 2020 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 30 September 2020

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such as timing availability of community living in deras – an Urdu term for living quarters of transgender individuals— varied according to living condition and income source, lack of knowledge about COVID-19 and preventative measures taken by people in deras, making transgender individuals at risk of getting infected with the virus and imposed risk of exposure to their staff, including other problems (see Table 2). They stated that these challenges were key organizational knowledge-gaps regarding the community, and provided them crucial learning points for future interventions. An HIV foundation from Malaysia, on the other hand, did not anticipate the unwillingness of applicants to reveal their identity, which they required for compliance and accountability purposes. They reported There were enquiries from PLHIVs for funding assistance to procure HAART [Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy]. But these applicants did not apply for the grant assistance, Some of these applicants inform me that they are not comfortable to reveal their names and contact details …as they wanted to remain anonymous. We originally set these application guidelines to allow verification, compliance with clinical guidelines, and accountability to ILGA Asia, without realizing that some applicants may choose to be fully anonymous.20

A recipient from Vietnam stated that the time to run the entire project was constraining to them. They reported Time and spaces (limited in-person activities) limitation affected all aspects and activities. If we could, we would take more time to build a more concrete and long-term plan for each steps [sic]… 21

Speaking on time management, grantee from Mongolia reported that time management is an area they faced challenges in, but they asserted that it was a good learning experience, one they can use in future programs. Four grantees – explicitly stated that as the demand for services were high, with more funds, they could have provided crucial services to more needy people in the community. noted that although financial constraint was an issue they networked with a food supplier to get groceries at a cheaper rate, which allowed them to assist more people affected by COVID-19 in the community. Taking into account the anticipated and

20 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 31 August 2020 21 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 31 August 2020

23

unanticipated challenges grantees faced to run intervention activities and the ingenious ways in which they dealt with challenges, the humanitarian grant was moderately efficient. Despite the financial constraints, ILGA Asia’s Humanitarian Grant in response to COVID-19 served 2,352 LGBTIQ individuals in 117 cities, shown in Table 3.22 S. No.

Cities

Number of Beneficiaries

1

117

2352

Grant Amount Average Aid received (USD) per person 43,666

18.56

Table 3. Reach of humanitarian grant and average aid received.

In the initial proposals, grantees outlined measures they will take to ensure grant monies are effectively dispersed and funds are properly managed. Measures included submission of expense receipts, formation of a steering committee to monitor grant and activities, use of legal adviser and internal mechanism, signed invoices from recipients, statement from external bookkeeper, organization audit, procurement of identity cards of beneficiaries and others. Taken together with the reach of the humanitarian grant, the administration of the grants achieved its desired outcome in a highly effective manner.

Impact Local organizations in each country where the individual projects took place, a series of positive impacts have been identified on a wide-range of beneficiaries. Although, when the idea of the humanitarian grant was conceived, ILGA Asia was fully aware that long-term sustainability within the short lifespan of the program is difficult to obtain within the short program lifespan, end-line reports received from grantees indicate that they have aided in the short-term in reducing communities’ vulnerabilities. However, short-term sustainability was not always the outcome of intervention programs of a couple of grantees. An organization from China was able to form a new network with the grants they received and able to conduct gender activities with 80% in-network participants, and an organization from Vietnam created defined list of challenges faced by service providers in times of crisis, as well as baseline guidance for service providers on future engagement programs, both of 22 This table does not include the 7,000 direct beneficiaries reported by ICS Center, instead adds 489 people who were surveyed as people directly impacted.

24

which has the possibility of having long-term impacts. As mentioned in other sections, initial assessment suggested that many LGBTIQ faced a variety of challenges during the pandemic. End-line reports show the degree of suffering and how the grant they received from ILGA Asia helped them out in these trying times. Emphasizing on the importance of the humanitarian grant and positive impact it had on beneficiaries, grantees reported, …the support has helped them and it made it easier for few [sic] weeks. During those few weeks, they need not worry about what they will be doing and what can happen. It gave them some time to plan and prepare for the next month. It helped them to save their own money for the crisis in the future.23 To avoid the suicide in 2 cases, housing possibility in other 3 cases, and helping to create a job possibility in 2 cases (buying the tools for their work), health situation for another 4 persons with medicine and hospital costs, continuing the school in 2 cases.24 In the current pandemic, India is one severely affected by the Covid19 spread, and Transgender/Hijra communities among the most impacted communities with the LGBTQ spectrum. Support from ILGA Asia allowed us to provide ration and medicine support to LGBTQ communities in Mumbai, Delhi. The ration support could save the trans communities from hunger and starvation. ILGA Asia not only supported the communities with ration support but also addressed the need for rental support who were facing eviction by landlords. The rent support addressed the need for a safe shelter where the community continues to stay. This intervention has provided timely support to the transgender communities who have lost their livelihoods due to this pandemic. Additionally, the support also provided access to ART medicine and more importantly adherence was focused on PLHIV clients.25 Most significant change was being able to assist LGBTQI+ people in need, not just food and hygiene supplies. We supported two domestic violence people with shelter, and food for several days until finding a temporary shelter. We supported one transgender woman who had second degree burn, and who came to the LGBT Centre for support because she had no where to go. We took her to the emergency room, and than [sic] she was hospitalized 23 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 03 September 2020 24 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 01 October 2020 25 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 23 September 2020

25

for ten days. It was wonderful for us to be able to assist her during this difficult time. During the time she was in the hospital, we visited her several times- bought her all the necessary medicine and medical supplies, food, hygiene supplies, etc., The biggest change is that she asked whether if we could find her job because she is tired and afraid of being in the sex industry anymore. Thus, at the Centre we are planning to support her by hiring her as a project coordinator’s assistance for several months. Also she is enrolled in our Leadership program which also has four months of therapy sessions, etc., The overall most significant change is that our outreach to our community through the direct aid provided by ILGA helped us to engage more in depth with our community.26

Speaking on the impact grant had on their life, a transgender individual served had this to say: My name is XXX and I live with two chelas (transgender disciples) in Bagh-e-Hussain. I live on the money earned by begging. I used to go to different neighborhoods for begging [sic]. There are some households where I frequently visit once or twice in a month and they provide me food, clothes, and sometimes a little amount of money. This is how I have been earning overtime. As soon as the situation aggravated after Corona (COVID-19), I started facing a hard time. There was a restriction on movement and going out of the dera was almost impossible. I could barely have food at home and remained starved at times. I could have died out of hunger if I had not secretly visited some of the houses. But, the households I used to visit were also having problems of [sic] food shortage as they were also affected by the lockdown situation in the country and were not in a position to provide me anything.” “During these tough times, I used to pray in the hope of better days. Now that you have come with this ration package, I have no words to thank you and ILGA Asia organization. This ration will be sufficient for a couple of weeks for all of us living at the dera.27

With the diverse range of problems faced by people in the community, the work done by grantees proved to be crucial. Recounting stories of success, gratitude, experience of beneficiaries, several organizations shared the positive impact of the humanitarian grant. Some of what they shared are presented below: Eric (not his real name) works in the airlines industry, and is based in Malaysia, and of Philippine nationality. 26 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 06 October 2020 27 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 24 September 2020

26

He has been prescribed his HAART medication from his doctor in Philippines for a few years already and is virally undetectable as a result of the medication. Being an airsteward, he has no problem flying back to Philippines for his new supply of medication monthly. However since the Covid-19 pandemic, Philippines has closed their borders, and Eric has been unable to get his regular supply of HAART. The drug regime that he is using in Philippines is not found in Malaysia, and he needs to replace that with a similar regime in Kuala Lumpur, which cost about USD250 a month supply. As a foreigner, Eric needs to pay full cost for the medication that is normally provided for free to Malaysians. Based on his reduced income (the airlines suspended most flights and pay their staff only their basic salary), he is unable to pay for his monthly medication. This grant has provided him with a lifeline, by paying for his medication from July-September 2020. By doing so, Eric can continue to be virally undetectable and prevent transmitting HIV to other partners. Meanwhile, Eric will try to apply for a special permit to be able to resume the supply of medication from Philippines after September 2020.28 A 21 year old gay identified Imran worked in a oil tin factory at 2 dollars a day. The tin scraps wounded his legs and he was finding it hard to work. for any delay in job his full 2 dollars were deducted that day. With ILGA support he is now able to set up a small shop/ stall at his chawl house in slum. He is now self employed and now earns 5 - 7 dollars a day and he is now able to get medicine for his leg too. he is now able to support his parents too.29

The diversity within the LGBTIQ community is big and accommodates various sexual orientations, gender identities and expressions, and sex characteristics. Grantees were able to reach and assist a wide range of diverse-SOGIESC communities, including 63 people in the community who had contracted COVID-19, of which 45 had recovered at the time when grantees sent their reports. The data on Table 4 reveals that the humanitarian grant was able to reach diverse groups of people and vulnerable people within the community who are living below the poverty line of USD 1.90, HIV positive, have disability(ies), under 30 and 18, and over the age of 59. However, it should be noted that given the fast-paced nature of this project, unwillingness of beneficiaries to state their SOGIESC-identity and other layered intersectionalities, and lack of complete disaggregated data sent by some grantees, data from 28 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 25 September 2020 29 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 25 September 2020

27

the field may not accurately represent the total number vulnerable groups and people within it that benefited from this program, and the actual numbers may be much higher than reported. Note: Table 4 does not include data provided by a grant recipient from Vietnam as their intervention activity differed from other grantees that mostly provided material support or had direct involvement with impacted populations. A separate case study deals with their activities. S.No

Description of Impacted Population

Total Number of Impacted Population

1

Beneficiaries who self-identified as women

250

2

Beneficiaries who self-identified as intersex

17

3

Beneficiaries who self-identified as trans

1090

4

Beneficiaries who self-identified as lesbian

71

5

Beneficiaries who self-identified as gay

159

6

Beneficiaries who self-identified as bisexual

65

7

Beneficiaries who self-identified as queer

97

8

Beneficiaries living below the poverty line of USD 1.90

765

9

PLHIV beneficiaries

186

10

Beneficiaries with disability(ies)

31

11

Beneficiaries under 30

962

12

Beneficiaries under 18

101

13

Beneficiaries over 59

279

Table 4. Disaggregated data on impacted

Unlike other grantees that provided direct material assistance or came in physical contact with beneficiaries and/or provided emotional support, one of the recipients from Vietnam conducted a survey. 419 participants from the LGBTIQ community and 70 service providers participated in that survey. As a result of the survey they reported 7000 people from the community directly and 70,000 indirectly benefited from it, with the breakdowns shown in Table 5.

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S.No

Description of Impacted Population

Total Number of Impacted Population

1

Beneficiaries who self-identified as women

1000

2

Beneficiaries who self-identified as intersex

2

3

Beneficiaries who self-identified as trans

1000

4

Beneficiaries who self-identified as lesbian

1000

5

Beneficiaries who self-identified as gay

2000

6

Beneficiaries who self-identified as bisexual

500

7

Beneficiaries who self-identified as queer

200

8

Beneficiaries living below the poverty line of USD 1.90

200

9

PLHIV beneficiaries

0

10

Beneficiaries with disability(ies)

0

11

Beneficiaries under 30

500

12

Beneficiaries under 18

700

13

Beneficiaries over 59

0

Table 5. Disaggregated data on impacted reported by ICS Center

Knowledge Generation Organizations were asked if they encountered any problems with ILGA Asia during the grant period. Of the sixteen organizations that answered the question, fourteen said they did not encounter any problems. Two organizations that said they encountered problems, one said that they would have liked more guidance regarding budget format from ILGA Asia, and the other organization said they faced problems collecting financial documents to comply with ILGA Asia’s financial requirements. Organizations were also asked to rate the friendliness of filing out the end-line report on a scale of 1 to 5, 1 being least friendly and 5 being the friendliest. All organizations that submitted ratings, rated the friendliness of this report as either 4 or 5. As the impacts of the pandemic is on-going and evolving, when asked how ILGA Asia can help them better, many grantees answered that they want more long-term and 29

continuous funding to better serve many people in the community who are still extremely vulnerable. They also noted that linking them up with or informing them about emergency grants or COVID-19 related targeted grants would help them. Additionally, grantees noted that ILGA Asia should create platforms to empower communities and help them out to build capacities by way of knowledge generation through community mapping, other relevant resource development, and human resource development, so that organizations are better equipped to deal with similar situations in the future. A few grantees reported that their lack of technical skills in times like these restricted them to pull in necessary resources, and asked ILGA Asia to provide technical skills to member organizations such as financial management, community organizing, and proposal writing skills.30 Furthermore, as many people lost their livelihood in on-going pandemic, a grantee suggested that some kind of livelihood program would be lifesaving.31 An organization reported that there were too many paperwork involved in this process, and suggested that it be reduced. As the impact and spread of COVID-19 differed across nations in Asia, an organization noted that ILGA Asia needs to be more flexible and be more understanding of unique situations faced by organizations operating from diverse nations of the Asian region, and accordingly plan implementation periods.

30 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 06 November 2020 31 ILGA Asia interview with [name withheld], online, 30 September 2020

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Lessons Learned Program Design, Monitoring, and Implementation •

Much of the success of local activities was due to the fact that local organizations designed activities to address local needs and vulnerabilities, responsive feedback and flexibility to design and redesign country-specific activities proved effective as the impact of the pandemic evolved during the program implementation period.



Since the grants assistance program was spread across diverse countries in the Asian region, most organizations benefited from flexibility shown by ILGA Asia. However, a greater degree of flexibility in regards to implementation period in countries with repressive laws against LGBTIQ people would have been helpful.



It was revealed that some LGBTIQ individuals are unwilling to share their SOGIESC-identity and HIV status, rendering some aspects of program requirements challenging to procure, data collection process difficult and key disaggregated data possibly inaccurate.



Since the grants assistance program was community based and managed, intervention activities were able to cater to the needs of the most vulnerable in the community such as PLHIV and disabled LGBTIQ individuals.



Implementation activities highlighted organizational knowledge gaps among some local organizations in regards to needs and challenges ranging from economic to psychosocial counselling faced by the community, as well as effective ways of implementing similar activities, generating crucial knowledge regarding cross-sections such as gender identity, type of work and appropriate scheduling for service delivery, and difficulty obtaining life-saving medications due

31

to national origin/socially imposed stigma that amplify vulnerabilities. Implementation activities highlighted organizational knowledge gaps among some local organizations in regards to needs and challenges ranging from economic to psychosocial counselling faced by the community, as well as effective ways of implementing similar activities, generating crucial knowledge regarding crosssections such as gender identity, type of work and appropriate scheduling for service delivery, and difficulty obtaining life-saving medications due to national origin/socially imposed stigma that amplify vulnerabilities. •

The technical and complex application process should be commensurate with the capacities of organizations to complete the process. Many organizations noted that filling up paperwork was a major challenge, taking away valuable time and resources which they could use to serve the community. However, since the aim of the grants assistance program was to provide support to LGBTIQ individuals, the output was properly achieved.

Vulnerabilities Amplified •

Impact of the pandemic on LGBTIQ individuals was on-going and widespread, highlighting a need for long-term funding.



It was observed that economically and socially marginalized groups holding precarious jobs in the informal sectors of the economy with limited social and cultural capital, as well as groups that proportionally face higher degree of discrimination because of their gender expression and identity impacted the most during the implementation period, highlighting a need for more targeted intervention activities that are inclusive of crosssections within the community.



As organizations with a thorough risk assessment were better prepared to deal with anticipated risks, a comprehensive mapping of risks is crucial for success of intervention programs. 32

Importance of Stakeholders A few organizations used ingenuous partnership with stakeholders. Those organizations that partnered with stakeholders ranging from police to small vendors were able to handle challenges better and/or run intervention programs effectively and efficiently.

33

Recommendations Program Design, Monitoring, and Implementation •

Local intervention activities should be anchored not only on suggested activities but also on ILGA Asia Strategic plan and priority areas.



The impact of the pandemic has disproportionate impacts on vulnerable groups within the LGBTIQ community, prioritize intervention activities that target people with disability, marginalized ethnicity/race, indigenous or minority status, caste, property ownership, health status, national origin, urban/ rural location, as well as diverse-SOGIESC identity or variation.



As the impact of the pandemic is on-going and evolving, so are the needs on the ground. Intervention programs need to be weary of this reality and release funds accordingly. Humanitarian programs rolled out in phases have the potential to ensure a long-term support to cater to evolving needs.



The spread of COVID-19 in the region differed greatly as did the measures taken to control its spread. Taken together with the variation in levels of acceptance and/or discrimination faced by LGBTIQ people in respective countries, implementation period of activities should be country-specific.



Local organizations lack technical skills to fill up complex paperwork that require considerable effort, taking away valuable time from overworked staff of organizations. Simplify forms, reduce paperwork, provide guidance to fill up financial forms, provide all necessary documents at the start of the program and walk through each form for organizations lacking capacities.

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Funding •

As the impact on the pandemic is directly correlated to the ability of respective governments to financially support marginalized people and their willingness to include LGBTIQ people in priority groups/at-risk populations, funding priorities should align with those realities.



Raise voices and advocate in international platforms and fora to include LGBTIQ people as priority population/at-risk in humanitarian response funding plans.



Create a Humanitarian Fund Scheme by funneling/allocating financial resources from existing programs, so that they can be swiftly released in future crises. Additionally, new ILGA Asia funding proposals should include a clause to allocate a small amount to finance grants programs for future crises.



Look for opportunities and ways to provide long-term funding to support economically disenfranchised communities that are facing starvation due to the pandemic.



Many organizations lack technical expertise, provide organizational development support and urge donors to fund core funding.



Scope out information on COVID-related funds and disseminate gathered information to member organizations.

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Enabling Environment •

As noted by grantees and taking into account models of redesign of activities, intervention activities provided key insights into the community to several grantees. Prioritization of mapping in terms of vulnerabilities with an intersectional approach will better prepare organizations to smoothly roll out intervention activities that are more targeted and effective.



It was observed that organizations lack technical skills to secure financial resources from donors and meet their requirements. Provide technical skills training programs to member organizations so that they are enabled to handle crises without much difficulty.



Effective use of stakeholders proved to be crucial to the success of this program for many organizations, prioritizing development and maintenance of good relationships between member organizations and diverse groups of stakeholders, including authorities.

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Annex 1: Cross-sections Reached Through Grants Program Beneficiaries under 30

Beneficiaries under 18

Beneficiaries under 30

Beneficiaries with disability(ies)

Benefeciaries living with HIV

Benefeciaries living below the poverty line

Country

Iran

13

2

1

12

1

0

India

155

25

0

140

1

0

0

35

0

25

0

55

60

10

1

10

0

0

China

1

3

0

100

30

0

Lebanon

0

0

0

40

1

0

India

0

4

0

75

0

0

200

0

0

5000

700

0

Nepal Pakistan

Vietnam Vietnam

10

Pakistan

400

30

0

250

50

200

Mongolia

60

21

3

100

14

23

Lebanon

50

4

0

50

0

0

Singapore

0

0

0

26

2

0

Philippines

17

1

5

33

0

0

6

6

0

0

0

0

Malaysia India

10

Philippines Pakistan

Total

3

45

1

101

2

1

965

186

31

5962

801

279

37

Annex 2: SOGIESC Community Reached Through Grants Program Self-identified as Queer

Self-identified as Bi

Selfdentifiedas Gay

Self-identified as Lesbian

Selfidentified as Transgender

Self-identified as intersex

Self-identified women

Country

Iran

8

1

7

3

1

0

1

India

2

10

140

0

3

2

0

Nepal

0

0

80

0

0

0

0

Pakistan

0

0

20

1

10

4

2

China

66

0

5

18

23

16

10

Lebanon

38

0

8

0

0

0

0

0

0

29

4

41

0

0

1000

2

1000

1000

2000

500

200

Pakistan

0

5

495

0

0

0

0

Mongolia

100

1

31

35

40

35

60

Lebanon

24

0

18

6

24

2

0

Singapore

12

0

11

4

11

6

13

Philippines

0

0

50

0

0

0

0

Malaysia

0

0

0

0

6

0

0

India Vietnam Vietnam

India

20

10

Philippines Pakistan

0

0

176

0

0

0

1

Total

1250

19

2090

1071

2159

565

297

38