Data Loading...

Fayston 2022 Feb 9 DIGITAL Flipbook PDF

Fayston 2022 Feb 9 DIGITAL


101 Views
77 Downloads
FLIP PDF 5.65MB

DOWNLOAD FLIP

REPORT DMCA

TABLE OF CONTENTS History Yields................................................................................................................................................... 2 Warning of Town Meeting 2022 ...................................................................................................................3-4 Informational Meeting February 23, 2021 Minutes......................................................................................5-8 Town Officials.............................................................................................................................................9-11 Selectboard Report....................................................................................................................................12-13 Lister Report .............................................................................................................................................14-15 Zoning and Planning Report .......................................................................................................................... 16 Town Clerk Statement and Vitals................................................................................................................... 17 Cemetery Commissioner Report.................................................................................................................... 18 Fayston Conservation Commission Report.................................................................................................... 19 Auditor Report Notice.................................................................................................................................... 20 General Fund: Budget 2022 ......................................................................................................................21-23 General & Capital Budget Summary............................................................................................................. 24 P&L Comparison & Chart ............................................................................................................................. 25 Revenue Estimates ......................................................................................................................................... 26 Capital Budget and Program.....................................................................................................................27-28 Fixed Assets ................................................................................................................................................... 29 Request for Funds .......................................................................................................................................... 30 Friends of the Mad River ............................................................................................................................... 31 Joslin Memorial Library ................................................................................................................................ 32 Central Vt. Regional Planning Commimssion ............................................................................................... 33 Central Vt. Home Health & Hospice ............................................................................................................. 34 Green Mountain Transit ............................................................................................................................35-36 Green Up Vermont ......................................................................................................................................... 37 Mad River Ambulance ..............................................................................................................................38-39 Mad River Path Association......................................................................................................................40-41 Mad River Valley Community Fund .............................................................................................................. 42 Mad River Valley Housing Coalition ............................................................................................................. 43 Mad River Valley Health Center .................................................................................................................... 44 Mad River Valley Planning District ............................................................................................................... 45 Mad River Valley Public Access Television Channel 44 ..........................................................................46-47 Mad River Valley Recreation District ............................................................................................................ 48 Mad River Valley Senior ............................................................................................................................... 49 Mad River Resource Management Alliance .................................................................................................. 50 Skatium .......................................................................................................................................................... 51 VSNIP............................................................................................................................................................ 52 Waitsfield-Fayston Fire Department .........................................................................................................53-54 FY 22 Education Tax Rates ......................................................................................................................55-58 Equalization Study Results for Fayston....................................................................................................59-60 Preliminary Cash Flow .............................................................................................................................61-63 HUUSD FY2022 Budget Availability............................................................................................................ 64 

1

2

WARNING OF TOWN MEETING 2022

3

4

INFORMATIONAL MEETING FEBRUARY 23, 2021

5

6

7

8

9

Jared Cadwell (Chair) Chuck Martel Mike Jordan

Patti Lewis

Patti Lewis

Patti Lewis

Timothy Jones Theresa Membrino

Doug Mosle Sarah Stavraky Vacant

Vacant

Ken Amann Candace Porter David Koepele

Sally Reisner Trish Read

Fredrick Rayfield

Stuart Hallstrom

Sarah Stavraky Lisa Koitzsch

Patti Lewis

Hanna Neill

Kevin Vanschaick

Jeremiah Rutledge

Michael Quenneville

Rick Swanson

Hanna Neill

Brad Long

Selectboard Selectboard Selectboard

Town Clerk

Town Treasurer

Delinquent Tax Collector

HUUSD School Director HUUSD School Director

Lister Lister Lister

Second Constable

Cemetery Commissioner Cemetery Commissioner Cemetery Commissioner

Joslin Library Trustee

(elected by Library Board)

Moderator

Road Foreman

Assistant Town Clerk & Treas Assistant Town Clerk & Treas

Selectboard Assistant

Zoning Administrator

First Constable

Animal Control Officers

Tree Warden

Service Officer

Health Officer

Energy Coordinator

2021

V

V

V

V

P

V

P

P

P P

P

V

V V

V V V

V

P P P

V V

P

P

P

254 Moulton Road 713 Randell Road 563 Big Basin Rd

3195 N. Fayston Rd. 152 Mansfield Road

P.O. Box 819

P.O. Box 1299 92 Fire Pond Lane

41 Town Garage Road

533 Millbrook Road

866 N. Fayston Rd.

483 Smith Road

Lockwood Brook

735-8083

c/o 866 N. Fayston Road

496-2454 x 4 866 N. Fayston Road

760-7787

496-8827

496-4424

793-2752

496-2454 x 4 866 N. Fayston Road

496-2454 x 1 866 N. Fayston Road

496-2454 x 2 866 N. Fayston Road 496-9419 x 2 968 Bragg Hill Road

496-8827

Fayston

Fayston Fayston Fayston

Fayston Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Waitsfield Fayston Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Fayston Fayston

Fayston

Waitsfield

Waitsfield Fayston

P.O. Box 875 Waitsfield 1089 Phen Basin Road Fayston 3400 Center Fayston Road Fayston

APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS

496-5667

496-7010 496-3052

496-4111 496-4505 583-1799

496-2454 x 3 866 N. Fayston Rd. 496-2454 x 3 866 N. Fayston Rd.

496-7855 496-2681

496-2454 x 1 866 N. Fayston Rd.

496-2454 x 1 866 N. Fayston Rd.

496-2454 x 1 866 N. Fayston Rd.

V/S 496-3295 V/S 496-5932 V/S 496-4929

ELECTED AT TOWN MEETING

TOWN OFFICIALS

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont Vermont

Vermont Vermont Vermont

Vermont

Vermont Vermont Vermont

Vermont Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont Vermont Vermont

05660 1 year

05660 1 year

05673 1 year

05660 1 year

05673 1 year

05673 1 year

05660 1 year

05660 1 year

05660 1 year 05673 1 year

05660 1 year

05673 1 year

05673 5 year 05673 5 year

05673 3 year 05663 3 year 05660 3 year

1 year

05660 3 year 05660 3 year 05660 3 year

05660 3 year 05673 3 year

05660 1 year

05660 1 year

05660 1 year

2022

2022

2022

2022

2022

2022

2022

2022

2022 2022

2022

2022

2026 2023

2024 2023 2022

2022

2024 2022 2023

2022 2024

2022

2022

2022

Term Term Length Ends 05673 3 year 2024 05660 3 year 2022 05660 3 year 2023

10

Craig Snell

Lindsay Browing

Matt Howes

Dan Beede

Carol Chamberlin Don Siminoni Doug Day (Chair) Peter Ludlow Jennifer Hammond Karen Sauther Rick Swanson

Ky Koitzsch Peter Ludlow Shane Mullen (Chair) Michael Quenneville Daniel Young Nicholas Skwira, Alternate Vacant

Corrie Miller (Co-Chair) Vacant Vacant Ned Kelley Akhil Kaplan Vacant Lisa Koitzsch (Co-Chair)

Lisa Koitzsch Corrie Miller Chuck Martel Woody Dugan Pete Colgan Karrie Thomas Sally Dwyer

Jared Cadwell Chuck Martel- Alternate

Vacant John Stokes

Russ Bowen

Don Simonini

Emergency Management

Legal Consultant

Grand Juror

Fire Warden

Planning Commission Planning Commission Planning Commission Planning Commission Planning Commission Planning Commission Planning Commission

Development Review Board Development Review Board Development Review Board Development Review Board Development Review Board Development Review Board Development Review Board

Conservation Commission Conservation Commission Conservation Commission Conservation Commission Conservation Commission Conservation Commission Conservation Commission

Boyce Hill Steering Committee Boyce Hill Steering Committee Boyce Hill Steering Committee Boyce Hill Steering Committee Boyce Hill Steering Committee Boyce Hill Steering Committee Boyce Hill Steering Committee

MRVPD MRVPD

Recreation District Recreation District

Cntrl. Vt. Regional Planning

TAC

496-9107

496-5603

496-3677

V

V

V V

V V

V V V V V V V

496-4183

496-3770

496-2170

496-3295 496-5932

279-2173 802-999-2213 496-5932 498-4405 781-771-5568 Confidential 496-2889

279-2173

V

Fayston

Fayston Waitsfield Fayston Fayston Fayston Fayston

Fayston Fayston Fayston Waitsfield Waitsfield Fayston Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

414 Deer Run Lane

488 Farm Road

916 Phen Basin Road

254 Moulton Road 713 Randell Road

PO Box 953 Confidential 713 Randell Road 3370 N. Fayston Road 1864 Airport Road 68 Glen View Road 705 Dunbar Hill Road

PO Box 953

Fayston

Fayston

Fayston Fayston

Waitsfield Fayston

Waitsfield Fayston Fayston Fayston Fastyon Fayston Fayston

Waitsfield

576 Smith Road Fayston 3531 Center Fayston Road Fayston

496-9420 279-9272

V V

PO Box 953 P.O. Box 574 347 Glen View Road 353 Murphy Road 38 Nelson Farm Road 2945 N. Fayston Road

21 Randell Road 414 Deer Run Lane 406 Deer Run Lane P.O. Box 574 P.O. Box 58 347 Glen View Road 533 Millbrook Road

802-999-2213 Confidential

279-3237 496-5193 496-7997 496-2190 496-5603

496-4611 496-4183 496-4374 496-5193 496-2174 496-7997 760-7787

2333 N. Fayston Road

78 Ward Hollow Road

38 Nelson Farm Road

2410 Center Fayston Road Fayston

V

V V V V V V V

V V V V V V V

V/S 923-6928

V

V

V

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont Vermont

Vermont Vermont

Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont

Vermont

Vermont Vermont

Vermont

Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont

Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

3 year 3 year 3 year 3 year 3 year 1 year 1 year

4 year 4 year 4 year 4 year 4 year 4 year 4 Year

2 year 2 year 2 year 2 year 2 year 2 year 2 year

05660 1 year

05673 1 year

05673 3 year 05660 3 year

05673 1 year 05660 1 year

05673 05660 05660 05660 05660 05660 05660

05660 3 year 3 year 3 year 05660 3 year 05660 3 year 3 year 05673 3 year

05660 05673 05673 05660 05660 05660 05673

05660 05660 05660 05673 05673 05673 05673

05660 1 year

05660 1 year

05660 1 year

05660 1 year

2022

2022

2021 2023

2022 2022

2022 2022 2022 2022 2022 2022 2022

2024 2022 2023 2023 2024 2022 2022

2022 2023 2024 2022 2023 2022 2022

2022 2023 2022 2025 2022 2024 2024

2022

2022

2022

2022

11

Doug Wilson

Chuck Martel Mike Jordan, Alternate

Peter Forbes Jared Cadwell Lisa Koitzsch Fredrick Rayfield Danielle Howes

Camel's Hump State Forest

MR Resource Mngmt Alliance MR Resource Mngmt Alliance

Justice Of The Peace Justice Of The Peace Justice Of The Peace Justice Of The Peace Justice Of The Peace

V=VOLUNTEER P=PAID V/S=VOLUNTEER/STIPEND V/P=VOLUNTEER/MAY PAY

Vacant

Police Advisory Committee

V V V V V

V V

V

V 713 Randell Road 563 Big Basin Rd

1169 Kew Vasseur Road

496-5685 496-3295 279-2173 496-5667 496-9107

700 Bragg Hill Road 254 Moulton Road P.O. Box 953 P.O. Box 819 78 Ward Hollow Road

ELECTED AT GENERAL ELECTION

496-5932 496-4929

496-3836

Fayston Waitsfield Waitsfield Waitsfield Fayston

Fayston Fayston

Fayston

Fayston

Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont Vermont

Vermont Vermont

Vermont

Vermont

05673 05673 05673 05673 05660

2 year 2 year 2 year 2 year 2 year

05660 1 year 05660 1 year

05673 1 year

05660 1 year

Feb-23 Feb-23 Feb-23 Feb-23 Feb-23

2022 2022

2022

2022

SELECTBOARD REPORT Fayston Selectboard Report for 2021 2021 was an exceptionally busy and challenging year. Despite the restrictions and delays caused by Covid virus protocols, town officials, staff and volunteers were able to accomplish a great deal. We commend the volunteers who selflessly serve on the town’s various commissions, boards and committees. We thank the following individuals for their service: Zelda LaVanway, who faithfully served for many years on the Cemetery Commission, and Lindsay Browning, who has served on the Development Review Board. Candace Porter is Zelda’s replacement on the Cemetery Commission and Daniel Young is Lindsay’s replacement on the Development Review Board. We welcome Candace and Daniel. Volunteers are essential to the smooth functioning of our local government. There are opportunities to serve on the Conservation Commission and Boyce Hill Town Forest Committee. Please contact the town office for more information. We also wish to thank John “JB” Weir for his service as the town’s Zoning Administrator and assistant to the Development Review Board and Planning Commission. We wish him well in his new position as Waitsfield’s Zoning Administrator. We are pleased that we were able to hire a very capable replacement, Hanna Neil (who many of you may know from her work at Kenyon’s Farm Store). Covid supply chain issues have delayed the delivery of the new plow truck that was purchased in 2021. We are hopeful that the truck will be delivered in the late spring of 2022. These supply chain issues may affect future plow truck and other road equipment purchases. The Town Garage discussion has also been delayed but will need to be addressed as soon as Covid restrictions have been relaxed. Our ever-resourceful town office staff led by Patti Lewis, Town Clerk/Treasurer, have spearheaded the improvement of “virtual” meeting accessibility. New video conferencing hardware and acoustic improvements to the town hall meeting have enhanced citizen participation in the town’s various public meetings. The “hot'' real estate market has directly the town’s Common Level of Appraisal (CLA). We may be a year away from the State requiring us to execute a town wide re-appraisal. Our current CLA stands at 89%. If sales trends continue, we could see fall under the re-appraisal threshold of 85%. Fortunately, we have monies set aside for this likely event. The road crew led by road foreman, Stuart Hallstrom, embarked on year one of a two-year project to replace the culverts and re-paving off North Fayston Road. All affected culverts were replaced in a timely manner by the road crew and ST Paving completed the first phase of asphalt paving. The final coat of asphalt will be done by ST Paving by early summer of 2022, weather permitting The following smaller projects were completed in 2021: the re-grading of the Town Hall parking lot, the installation of an asphalt handicap access walkway to the Town Hall, continued maintenance of the Randall Road beaver dam culvert (due to be up-sized in

12

2022 or 2023), regular grading and top-coating of the 27+ miles of town gravel roads, road-side mowing, and gravel and winter sand processing at the gravel pit. The Selectboard, other town officials and the public have met on three occasions in order to submit a rebuttal to the State’s Reapportionment Board’s recommendation that Fayston’s current state legislature representation be changed from its participation in a two-member, five town district to being “divided” into two one member districts; meaning, Fayston would not be considered a distinct geographic entity. The Town has strongly urged the Reapportionment Board and our local state representatives to maintain the status quo: as a two-member, five town district. The Selectboard has been working closely with the Road Crew to determine the most financially effective equipment purchases program for the next ten years. Plow trucks are now on a seven-year replacement schedule to take advantage of warranty programs and trade-in values. Other high-cost equipment replacements that are looming are our current bucket loader and grader. The Selectboard supports increased capital reserve funding for these essential purchases. The Waitsfield-Fayston Fire Department and the Fayston and Waitsfield Selectboards have been meeting regularly to prepare both operating and capital budgets for the Fire Department. The Fire Department’s equipment (trucks, fire-fighting gear, air packs, etc) needs more consistent upgrades and replacement. The Selectboard is actively supporting increased cooperation between the two Selectboards and the Fire Department. This has led to a clear program of annual operating budget management and on-going capital equipment replacement. As we plan for Town Meeting 2022, we anticipate, due to covid concerns, that we will conduct it in the same manner as last year. This means that we will hold an online information meeting within ten days of Town Meeting Day, March 2nd and will decide all elections, budget and policy matters via Australian ballot on March 2nd at the Town Hall. Please take the time to attend the information meeting as this will provide essential information for you to make informed votes! The Selectboard would like to close our report with a special “thank you” to our front office staff; Patti Lewis, Sarah Stavraky, Lisa Osborn Koitzsch, Hanna Neil and Doug Mosle. Despite the challenges of the pandemic, they’ve unfailingly and cheerfully provided essential information, services and advice to our taxpayers and to the general public. We also thank our town road crew; Stuart Hallstrom, Tony Long and Josh Livingston, who have been steady behind the wheels, shovels and the plows throughout this crisis. We owe them all our deep gratitude! Respectfully, Jared Cadwell, Chair Chuck Martel Michael Jordan

13

LISTER REPORT

Lister Report - 2021 Unless you have been living in a complete media blackout, you know that the real estate boom, which began in 2020, continued in 2021. Although only those who are buying or selling a home in the current market feel the direct impact of that boom, taxpayers feel the effects in a slightly more oblique manner. The State of Vermont will “equalize” our tax rate using a formula that takes our Common Level of Appraisal into consideration, and since the CLA is an amalgam of fair market sales from the previous three years, as the CLA goes, so does our tax rate. And as our tax rate goes……. After three years of relative stability following our most recent reappraisal (2016-2019) our CLA dropped a remarkable 5% in 2020 on the strength of 41 residential sales that averaged about 12% above the towns assessed values for those homes. In 2021 we saw the CLA drop another 3% on 50 residential sales that averaged about 15% above the towns assessed values for those properties. Since the State of Vermont will require a reappraisal if the CLA dips below 85%, it will be interesting to watch the real estate market over the next year. While there are no obvious indicators of a slowdown, the lack of inventory could certainly predict a leveling out of the CLA. If it does not, we could be looking at an ordered reappraisal as soon as 2023.

Education CLA and COD 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 CLA 100.3 101 101.6 105.8 104.7 105.3 105.2 100.5 99.76 97.15 92.63 89.74 COD 7.18 6.15 6.13 8.06 12.09 11.47 13 4.59 5.84 7.62 11.61 13.89

CLA

COD

The Common Level of Appraisal (CLA) represents the average ratio (shown as a percentage) of sales in the town during the past three years, as compared to their assessed value. Therefore a CLA of 100% indicates that, on average, homes over the past three years sold for their assessed value. A lower CLA indicates that properties are selling above the town’s assessment; a higher CLA indicates the opposite. A CLA below 85% will trigger a mandatory reappraisal. The Coefficient of Dispersion (COD) represents the average absolute difference of each property’s sale ratio from the median sales ratio, an indicator of how fairly the property tax burden is distributed within the town. Therefore a higher COD indicates greater disparity and a lower COD indicates greater parity. A COD above 20% will trigger a mandatory reappraisal. Continued

14

Building Permits – Residential construction remained active in 2021, with all categories (new homes, additions and other structures) up from 2020 while subdivision applications were up three fold from 2020 and state wastewater permits were up considerably - all indicators of an upward trend in construction. It is critical that we keep up with residential construction permits and values, since these updates are the only way to keep our CLA inline during the interim years between reappraisals. The more thorough we are, the more accurate our grand list; the more accurate our grand list, the longer we can avoid a full reappraisal. During the course of the spring we will visit as many properties as possible that have zoning permits outstanding, and we ask for your cooperation in performing this task. If you would like to schedule a visit, please contact the Listers at 496-2454 x 3 or by email at [email protected] Otherwise we will call and schedule a time. Or we may stop by if we’re in the neighborhood. If you are uncomfortable with us visiting due to the ongoing pandemic, please let us know and we can make reasonable accommodations. Homestead Declarations – Just an annual and friendly reminder that the State of Vermont requires each resident to declare their homestead status each year. This declaration may be done online beginning in February by visiting the Vermont Department of Taxes website. THERE IS A PENALTY IF YOU DO NOT FILE. The Dept. of Taxes has created a handy-dandy video tutorial on YouTube. Google it if you have any questions. New Lister(s) – as of the date of this publication, we are searching for 2 Listers. These are elected positions that can be filled by appointment if no candidate is elected at town meeting. The time commitment is flexible – as little as 3-4 hours per month or as much as a couple of days a week depending on experience/interest. These are paid positions, and there are opportunities for advancement. Please contact us if you are interested in more information. Finally, I’d like to thank Sarah Stavraky for her service as an elected Lister these past several years. She brought a great attitude, attention to detail and a penchant for numbers that will be sorely missed as she is not seeking reelection in 2022. Thanks again for all you do to support the Listers in maintaining the Town’s Grand List. We look forward to seeing you around town. Respectfully Submitted, Doug Mosle and Sarah Stavraky Fayston Board of Listers

15

2021 Zoning & Planning Report:

ZONING AND PLANNING REPORT

The Fayston Planning Commission is currently a seven-member volunteer board. The Development Review Board is a fivemember volunteer board. Both boards over Fme seek out new members. If you are interested in taking part in Fayston’s planning or development process, contact Hanna Neill, Planning & Zoning Administrator, at [email protected] The Planning Commission has spent the year 2021 revising the current 2018 Land Use RegulaFons with planned compleFon scheduled for June of 2022. The intenFon of this revision is to update the current regulaFons in regards to new State Statutes, technological advancements, and an ever changing town dynamic. These revisions will help align the LURS with the 2020 Town Plan and support the goals for the future of the Town of Fayston. The Development Review Board has seen 19 applicaFons this year, an unprecedented amount and more than double the applicaFons from 2020. This increase can be aWributed to the growing need for more housing and the surge in wanFng to call Fayston home. Increased subdivisions allow for greater housing density while the decrease in available lots has led to more condiFonal use applicaFons. The Fayston Zoning & Planning Administrator’s (ZA) responsibility is to aWend to all Zoning Permit acFviFes, enforce the zoning regulaFons, keep detailed records of permit acFvity, and provide guidance to permit applicants. The ZA also provides administraFve support to the Planning Commission for town plan and land use regulaFons work, and to the Development Review Board for all CondiFonal Use and Subdivision applicaFons. The ZA is charged with interpreFng the Land Use RegulaFons. In 2021, the ZA and the Development Review Board worked closely to review a grand total of 95 applicaFons, as follows:

TYPE OF ZONING PERMIT:

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

SUBDIVISION & AMEND.

11

4

2

5

7

5

7

SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES

13

6

12

8

8

6

9

ADDITIONS/OTHER STRUCTURES

38

37

19

31

20

28

18

CERTIFICATES OF OCCUPANCY 12

6

7

7

8

11

2

CONDITIONAL USE

19

8

9

8

3

5

3

HOME OCCUPATION

2

2

0

0

1

0

1

Wastewater applicaFons are reviewed by the State of Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Wastewater Management Division, which implements the state-wide Wastewater Permit Program. The State issued 12 in 2020 and 17 in 2021. Fayston requires that a CerFficate of Occupancy be applied for once a new residence is constructed. This cerFficate is applied for through the Zoning and Planning office. Forms can be obtained by mail, email, or on the Town of Fayston’s Website under Permits. Fayston Zoning Permits are required for all new buildings, addiFons, decks, sheds, barns, garages, accessory buildings, home occupaFons, accessory apartments, ponds, subdivisions, condiFonal uses and other uses detailed in the Land Use RegulaFons. ApplicaFons, zoning regulaFons, meeFng agendas, minutes of public hearings, and NoFces of Decision can all be found at the Town Office and Town of Fayston Website. Residents with quesFons are encouraged to contact the ZA Mondays – Thursdays from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Respecdully SubmiWed,

16

Hanna Neill Fayston Planning and Zoning Administrator/E-911 Coordinator/THO (802) 496-2454 ext. 4 [email protected]

TOWN CLERK STATEMENT & VITALS TOWN CLERK INFORMATION & STATEMENT OF FEES COLLECTED 2021 Town Meeting March 1, 2022 Grateful. That is the word I would use to describe 2021. Grateful for a great team at work, grateful to the citizens and non-citizens alike that came through our doors with patience and understanding, and grateful for the forethought that went into the municipal building counter/window set up. This has made a huge difference in our covid protocols and keeping everyone safe. Not to mention the countless number of smiles at the surprise of people who have never seen it operate as it was intended. Together we have weathered some very sad losses, huge covid concerns, and laughter when least expected and needed. As always there are many changes within our offices. Software systems and process continue to change at a rapid rate. Such as the way we handle elections, liquor licenses, vital records, marriage licenses, grand list, zoning permit database, audit and town report procedures, health insurance and the list goes on. If you are ever interested in how things are run in your Town, please do not hesitate to reach out to us. Also, remember that all board agendas and minutes are posted on our website at faystonvt.com. Boards welcome public attendance which is easier than ever right now as all meetings have Zoom links to attend remotely. It is with great disappointment that Town Meeting will once again not be held in person this year. We know how great it is to have people come together to debate budget, articles and to elect your Town officials from the floor. With much appreciation, Patti Lewis LIQUOR LICENSES DOG LICENSES (NET OF STATE FEES) MARRIAGE/CU LICENSES (NET OF STATE FEES) RECORDING/SEARCH/FEES/COPIES

$920.00 $837.00 $220.00 $35,254.05

VITAL RECORDS: BIRTHS 7 – DEATHS 6 – MARRIAGES 5 DOG LICENSE FEES On or before April 1st After April 1st

NEUTERED $9.00 $11.00

UNNEUTERED $13.00 $17.00

Please remember all owners or keepers of domestic dog and wolf-hybrids who are 6 months of age or older must obtain a license on or before April 1, 2022. To obtain a license the animal must have a valid rabies vaccination and a copy of the certificate filed with the town clerk. Please send in your information via mail, or drop slot in the front door of the Town Office, with the correct fee and self-addressed return envelope and we will mail you the tag as soon as they become available.

17

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS’ REPORT Cemetery Commissioners’ Report INCOME 10 Lot Sales 7 Grave Openings Investment Interest Donations

$7175 $2850 $700 $.00

EXPENSES Grounds Maintenance 5 Sets Cornerstones Setting Cornerstones Grave Openings Perpetual Care Account

$6000 $ 700 $ 120 $ 950 $1625

ASSETS Ck Book Balance 12/31/21 Perpetual Care Principal Perpetual Care Interest Restricted Fund

$ 3929.04 $ 30,700.00 $ 6,722.31 $ 179,722.57

__________ $10,725

__________ $9,395

__________ $221,073.92

Cemetery Activity South Fayston Cemetery 6 Cremations 1 Headstone 3 Groundstones 5 Lots Sold North Fayston Cemetery 2 Full Burials 2 Headstones 2 In-monument Cremation burials 5 Lots Sold 2021 was a busy and eventful year for the Fayston Cemetery Commission. Commissioner Zelda LaVanway, who tirelessly served on the Commission for 26 years, retired in August. Although she can never be replaced, her position is being filled by Candace Porter. Unofficially, Zelda remains our Commissioner Emeritus. The Town of Fayston and the Commission owe Zelda an enormous debt of gratitude. In 2021, we sold 10 lots and had the honor of assisting 10 families in burying their loved ones. Fayston has three cemeteries: one on Bragg Hill Road, one on Center Fayston Road, and one on North Fayston Road. They are all beautiful, fascinating, and well worth a visit. Ken Amann Dave Koepele Candace Porter

18

FAYSTON CONSERVATION COMMISSION REPORT

Fayston Conservation Commission Report to the Town Here are some highlights from the Fayston Conservation Commission’s (FCC) work in 2021:

Chase Brook Town Forest

Volunteers installed trail signs on the Fred Gilbert Dog Loop – a new walking trail dedicated to a long-time FCC and Green Mountain Club volunteer. The McCullough Barn, just next to the Chase Brook parking area, was treated for a powder post beetle infestation and will require a modified treatment every year to ensure these insects don’t do any further damage to the timber frame structure.

Boyce Hill Town Forest

2021 was a busy year for the Boyce Hill Town Forest Steering Committee (SC). We continued to meet every two to three weeks, mostly via Zoom, as we worked through the long-term planning process. We held three community forums in the Spring and early Summer to share our learning with the public and solicit their input and ideas on the management of the property. Topics covered were Land Management, Natural Resources, and Recreation and the forums can be viewed on MRVTV. We published an on-line public survey mid-summer and garnered close to 250 responses, primarily from Fayston residents. We continued to receive public input throughout the year and will be incorporating it into the management plan. In February, 15 hardy souls braved the cold temperatures for an apple tree pruning workshop, and in December, the Steering Committee hosted Brad Long, an Fayston resident who has been doing some historical research, on a tour of the property. Visitors to Boyce Hill increased significantly this year as word has spread about this special and treasured place. Most recently, Arrowwood Environmental completed a Viewshed Analysis to help the SC visualize various management strategies to protect valued views. As the year draws to a close, we have begun writing the first draft of the management plan and hope to engage the public in the spring again to fine tune our efforts. Once again, we thank Sugarbush for helping with a late fall mowing. We also thank all the people who have donated time and money towards the future management of the property and the many volunteers who have offered their services for future stewardship projects.

Community Recreation Visioning

The FCC has been working with the Warren and Waitsfield Conservation Commissions and Friends of the Mad River, to begin engaging our trail group partners and the community in developing a shared vision for recreation and trails in the Mad River Valley. In the short-term, we hope to establish a regular exchange of plans, information, and ideas among trail groups and conservation commissions. Over the longer term, we hope to create a Mad River Valley vision for a “Gold Standard” trail network that capitalizes on outdoor recreation for all its benefits while sustaining and enhancing the ecological integrity of the watershed.

Green-Up Day

The FCC coordinated Green-Up Day activities and volunteers spread out across Fayston on May 1, 2021, to pick up trash along roadsides and streams. Many thanks to the families and individuals who participated and to the Fayston Road Crew for removing all the waste. A special thank you to the enthusiastic Green Mountain Valley School students and faculty for their help! Thank you to our Fayston community for your continued dedication and support. We continue to seek new FCC members. If you are interested, please contact us at [email protected]

19

AUDITOR REPORT NOTICE

AUDITORS REPORT NOTICE FOTHERGILL SEGALE & VALLEY CERTIFICED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS COMPLIATION REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AS OF DECEMBER 31,2021 PLEASE NOTE: AS OF 2009 THE SELECTBOARD MADE THE DECISION TO NO LONGER REPRODUCE THE AUDIT/COMPLIATION REPORTS FOR THE FAYSTON TOWN REPORT. INSTEAD COPIES OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE VIEWED ON LINE AT FAYSTONVT.COM OR A COPY MAY BE REQUESTED FROM THE FAYSTON TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE. [email protected]

Culvert - Photo by Sarah Stavraky 20

GENERAL FUND: BUDGET 2022

Jan 1 - Dec 29, 21 Income INCOME 4000 · Town Taxes

Budget

$ Over Budget % of Budget

Budget

1,224,170.38

1,115,031.29

109,139.09

109.79%

74,712.10 4,500.00

70,000.00 4,500.00

4,712.10 0.00

106.73% 100.0%

72,000.00 4,500.00

920.00 220.00 837.00

1,000.00 100.00 1,500.00

-80.00 120.00 -663.00

92.0% 220.0% 55.8%

1,000.00 100.00 1,500.00

0.00 3,880.75

2,000.00 3,000.00

-2,000.00 880.75

0.0% 129.36%

4,000.00 3,000.00

4041 · Hall rental 4042 · Fees 4043 · Permits-EW

0.00 35,254.05 485.00

500.00 20,000.00 400.00

-500.00 15,254.05 85.00

0.0% 176.27% 121.25%

500.00 24,000.00 400.00

4048 · Zoning-fees

12,455.50

9,000.00

3,455.50

138.39%

10,000.00

4050 · Waitsfield road work 4052 · Delinquent tax interest

11,057.71 17,898.20

11,057.71 12,000.00

0.00 5,898.20

100.0% 149.15%

11,174.00 12,000.00

4054 · Delinquent tax penalties 4065 · Interest-CD 4075 · Interest - General Fund

10,792.56 0.00 2,683.80

10,000.00 1,200.00 5,000.00

792.56 -1,200.00 -2,316.20

107.93% 0.0% 53.68%

9,000.00 2,000.00 2,500.00

4700 · Current Use

48,730.00 15,393.60

40,000.00 15,000.00

8,730.00 393.60

121.83% 102.62%

45,000.00 15,000.00

1,463,990.65 4,400.00 1,803.53 0.00

1,321,289.00 0.00 1,803.53 46,000.00

142,701.65 4,400.00 0.00 -46,000.00

110.8% 100.0% 100.0% 0.0%

217,674.00 0.00

1,470,194.18

1,369,092.53

101,101.65

107.38%

264,174.00

1,470,194.18

1,369,092.53

101,101.65

107.38%

264,174.00

4010 · State Aid Highway 4015 · Green Mountain Valley School 4020 · Liquor licenses 4025 · Marriage licenses 4035 · Dog licenses 4036 · Record Preservation 4040 · Other income

4805 · PILOT Total INCOME 4012 · Grant Income 4601 · CTCV COVID Elections Grant 4999 · Fund Balance Prior Yr. Total Income Gross Profit Expense ADMINISTRATIVE 5305 · Pound

46,500.00

2,000.00

2,000.00

0.00

100.0%

2,000.00

5320 · Legal 5322 · Audit expense

1,197.50 7,500.00

5,000.00 7,500.00

-3,802.50 0.00

23.95% 100.0%

5,000.00 8,000.00

5323 · Fire Warden 5325 · Public Safety 5335 · MRV Solid Waste Alliance 5340 · Contingency & miscellaneous

300.00 0.00 9,471.00 35.00 2,751.00

300.00 300.00 9,471.00 0.00 2,751.00

0.00 -300.00 0.00 35.00 0.00

100.0% 0.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

300.00 300.00 9,548.00 0.00 2,802.00

23,254.50

27,322.00

-4,067.50

85.11%

27,950.00

103,223.52

100,457.00

2,766.52

102.75%

108,000.00

18,962.74 25,831.73

19,000.00 28,000.00

-37.26 -2,168.27

99.8% 92.26%

21,245.63 29,054.23

1,982.03 6,560.11

1,800.00 7,500.00

182.03 -939.89

110.11% 87.47%

1,800.00 7,500.00

156,560.13

156,757.00

-196.87

99.87%

167,599.86

304.28 758.35 723.68 3,499.00

1,500.00 4,000.00 0.00 4,000.00

-1,195.72 -3,241.65 723.68 -501.00

20.29% 18.96% 100.0% 87.48%

1,500.00 5,000.00 0.00 4,200.00

5910 · Leagues of Cities & Towns Total ADMINISTRATIVE BENEFITS 5050 · Hospitalization 5055 · Retirement 5060 · Taxes - payroll 5065 · Uniforms 5066 · Dental Total BENEFITS ELECTIONS 6005 · Election clerks 6010 · Supplies 6011 · CTCV COVID Elections Grant 6015 · Town Report

21

Total ELECTIONS HIGHWAY EQUIPMENT

5,285.31

9,500.00

-4,214.69

55.64%

10,700.00

5090 · Blades 5095 · Diesel 5100 · Repairs 5105 · Gasoline 5110 · Oil

4,991.86 29,207.01 31,940.79 3,036.68 3,267.95

5,000.00 30,000.00 25,000.00 750.00 3,000.00

-8.14 -792.99 6,940.79 2,286.68 267.95

99.84% 97.36% 127.76% 404.89% 108.93%

5,000.00 32,000.00 25,000.00 4,000.00 3,000.00

5115 · Other parts 5120 · Rental

8,660.74 25,880.56 9,723.91

7,000.00 12,000.00 11,000.00

1,660.74 13,880.56 -1,276.09

123.73% 215.67% 88.4%

7,000.00 12,000.00 11,000.00

116,709.50

93,750.00

22,959.50

124.49%

99,000.00

2,083.94 7,089.16

2,500.00 6,000.00

-416.06 1,089.16

83.36% 118.15%

2,500.00 7,000.00

4,035.77 1,757.28

3,500.00 2,000.00

535.77 -242.72

115.31% 87.86%

9,000.00 2,000.00

14,966.15

14,000.00

966.15

106.9%

20,500.00

179,824.05

180,000.00

-175.95

99.9%

189,000.00

1,175.04

8,000.00

-6,824.96

14.69%

8,000.00

180,999.09

188,000.00

-7,000.91

96.28%

197,000.00

12,143.16

12,000.00

143.16

101.19%

12,000.00

13,650.00 2,613.69 27,452.50

17,000.00 1,500.00 30,000.00

-3,350.00 1,113.69 -2,547.50

80.29% 174.25% 91.51%

17,000.00 1,500.00 25,000.00

5125 · Tires Total HIGHWAY EQUIPMENT HIGHWAY GARAGE 5130 · Electricity 5135 · Heat 5140 · Maintenance and repairs 5150 · Telephone Total HIGHWAY GARAGE HIGHWAY SALARIES 5170 · Salaries 5171 · Highway Adminstration Total HIGHWAY SALARIES HIGHWAY SUPPLIES 5070 · Calcium 5075 · Sand 5080 · Other supplies 5085 · Salt Total HIGHWAY SUPPLIES

55,859.35

60,500.00

-4,640.65

92.33%

55,500.00

INSURANCE 5400 · Property and Casualty

7,704.00

12,720.00

-5,016.00

60.57%

13,889.00

5410 · Public Officials 5430 · Workers' comp 5435 · Employment Practices

1,842.00 12,931.00 1,667.00

1,842.00 12,931.00 1,667.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

1,803.00 12,268.00 1,750.00

720.00

733.00

-13.00

98.23%

632.00

24,864.00

29,893.00

-5,029.00

83.18%

30,342.00

5450 · Cleaning 5455 · Electricity

1,680.00 2,839.74

1,900.00 3,000.00

-220.00 -160.26

88.42% 94.66%

1,900.00 3,000.00

5460 · Heat 5470 · Maintenance

2,775.75 3,369.68 3,234.79

3,500.00 5,000.00 3,200.00

-724.25 -1,630.32 34.79

79.31% 67.39% 101.09%

3,800.00 5,000.00 3,200.00

13,899.96

16,600.00

-2,700.04

83.74%

16,900.00

15,563.14 1,720.00 455.71

10,000.00 3,000.00 750.00

5,563.14 -1,280.00 -294.29

155.63% 57.33% 60.76%

16,000.00 3,000.00 750.00

5611 · 911 Wages 5612 · Tax Mapping 5615 · Selectboard 5616 · Selectboard Minutes 5625 · Postage

672.89 2,821.25 2,250.00 1,500.00 3,083.54

1,500.00 2,500.00 2,250.00 0.00 2,500.00

-827.11 321.25 0.00 1,500.00 583.54

44.86% 112.85% 100.0% 100.0% 123.34%

1,500.00 2,500.00 2,250.00 1,800.00 3,200.00

5630 · Equipment rental 5635 · Supplies

1,985.34 3,705.63

2,000.00 3,500.00

-14.66 205.63

99.27% 105.88%

2,100.00 3,500.00

5440 · VLCT Unemployment Total INSURANCE MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS

5475 · Telephone Total MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS OFFICE 5600 · Computer expenses 5605 · Equipment purchase 5610 · Listers-expenses

22

5650 · Seminars/dues 5655 · Bank fees Total OFFICE PLANNING 5700 · Advertising 5705 · CVRPC 5706 · FCC 5710 · ZA Exp/Misc 5711 · Planning-supplies 5714 · MRVPD 5720 · Planning/DRB Resources 5830 · Zoning Administration Total PLANNING SALARIES 5810 · Clerk,Treasurer & Tax Collector 5812 · Selectboard Assistant 5815 · Listers 5838 · Asst TC & Asst Treasurer Total SALARIES TAXES 5900 · Joslin Library Donation

1,167.00 10.00

1,000.00 0.00

167.00 10.00

116.7% 100.0%

3,500.00 0.00

34,934.50

29,000.00

5,934.50

120.46%

40,100.00

1,654.47 1,702.40 950.00 886.14 0.00

2,000.00 1,702.40 1,000.00 250.00 500.00

-345.53 0.00 -50.00 636.14 -500.00

82.72% 100.0% 95.0% 354.46% 0.0%

2,000.00 1,814.12 1,000.00 1,500.00 500.00

45,317.00 216.11 30,647.12

44,067.00 500.00 30,000.00

1,250.00 -283.89 647.12

102.84% 43.22% 102.16%

45,317.00 500.00 39,320.00

81,373.24

80,019.40

1,353.84

101.69%

91,951.12

60,849.27

60,849.13

0.14

100.0%

63,891.74

10,897.53 19,846.11 35,887.68

12,751.00 25,700.00 43,302.00

-1,853.47 -5,853.89 -7,414.32

85.46% 77.22% 82.88%

11,382.00 25,700.00 42,500.00

127,480.59

142,602.13

-15,121.54

89.4%

143,473.74

25,878.00

26,084.00

-206.00

99.21%

26,244.00

5925 · Washington County 5930 · Donations

31,021.00 20,338.00

31,021.00 16,338.00

0.00 4,000.00

100.0% 124.48%

30,996.00 16,988.00

5935 · Recreation District

30,000.00 15,000.00

30,000.00 0.00

0.00 15,000.00

100.0% 100.0%

30,000.00 0.00

122,237.00

103,443.00

18,794.00

118.17%

104,228.00

8001 · Transfer Road Retreatment 8002 · Transfer Equipment

90,000.00 125,000.00

90,000.00 125,000.00

0.00 0.00

100.0% 100.0%

0.00 200,000.00

8003 · Transfer Bridge 8004 · Transfer Fire Equipment 8006 · Transfer Road Construction

5,000.00 65,000.00 50,000.00

5,000.00 65,000.00 50,000.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

5,000.00 65,000.00 50,000.00

5937 · MRV Ambulance Total TAXES TRANSFERS

8008 Transfer ReAppraisal 8011 · Transfer FCC Conser Fund 8012 · Transfer Town Garage Reserve 8014 · Transfer - Culvert Reserve 8016 · Transfer Town Forest Reserve Total TRANSFERS Waitsfield & Fayston Fire Dept. 5380 · Waitsfield/Fayston Contract Total Waitsfield & Fayston Fire Dept. 530 · Misc Adjustments 6020 · Covid Election Funds Total Expense Net Income

3,500.00

3,500.00

0.00

100.0%

25,000.00 3,500.00

5,000.00 15,000.00 9,000.00

5,000.00 15,000.00 9,000.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

5,000.00 5,000.00 15,000.00

367,500.00

367,500.00

0.00

100.0%

373,500.00

56,607.73 56,607.73 0.30

50,156.00 50,156.00 0.00

6,451.73 6,451.73 0.30

112.86% 112.86% 100.0%

61,714.00 61,714.00 0.00

4,225.31

0.00

4,225.31

100.0%

0.00

1,386,756.66 1,369,042.53 17,714.13 83,437.52 Budget 2022 Budget 21 Difference

101.29%

1,440,458.72

1,440,458.72

1,369,042.53

71,416.19

% Increase 105.22%

5.22

23

GENERAL & CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY GENERAL/CAPITAL FUND BUDGET 2022 ACTUAL 2020

ACTUAL 2021

BUDGET 2022

ADMINISTRATIVE BENEFITS ELECTIONS FIRE HIGHWAY EQUIPMENT HIGHWAY GARAGE HIGHWAY SALARIES HIGHWAY SUPPLIES INSURANCE MUNCIPAL BUILDING OFFICE SUPPLIES/EXPENSES PLANNING OFFICER SALARIES TAXES COVID EXPENSE VIA GRANT INCOME TOTAL GENERAL FUND

GENERAL FUND BUDGET $28,817.00 $27,322.00 $135,009.14 $156,757.00 $5,841.81 $9,500.00 $50,961.27 $50,156.00 $86,139.16 $93,750.00 $14,295.21 $14,000.00 $174,829.63 $188,000.00 $56,841.60 $60,500.00 $22,541.00 $29,893.00 $13,328.49 $16,600.00 $21,012.77 $29,000.00 $80,130.55 $80,019.40 $121,596.70 $142,602.13 $118,491.00 $103,443.00 $0.00 $0.00 $929,835.33 $1,001,542.53

$23,254.50 $156,560.13 $5,285.31 $56,607.73 $116,709.50 $14,966.15 $180,999.09 $55,859.35 $24,864.00 $13,899.96 $34,934.50 $81,373.24 $127,480.59 $122,237.00 $4,225.61 $1,019,256.66

$27,950.00 $167,599.86 $10,700.00 $61,714.00 $99,000.00 $20,500.00 $197,000.00 $55,500.00 $30,342.00 $16,900.00 $40,100.00 $91,951.12 $143,473.74 $104,228.00 $0.00 $1,066,958.72

ROAD CONSTRUCTION ROAD RETREATMENT EQUIPMENT RESERVE FIRE EQUIPMENT RESERVE BRIDGE RESERVE REAPPRAISAL TOWN RECORD PRESERVATION CULVERT RESERVE CONSERVATION RESERVE TOWN GARAGE RESERVE TOWN FOREST RESERVE TOTAL CAPITAL FUND

CAPITAL FUND BUDGET $50,000.00 $50,000.00 $80,000.00 $90,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 $30,000.00 $65,000.00 $5,000.00 $5,000.00 $2,500.00 $0.00 $2,500.00 $0.00 $15,000.00 $15,000.00 $3,500.00 $3,500.00 $5,000.00 $5,000.00 $3,500.00 $9,000.00 $322,000.00 $367,500.00

$50,000.00 $90,000.00 $125,000.00 $65,000.00 $5,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $15,000.00 $3,500.00 $5,000.00 $9,000.00 $367,500.00

$50,000.00 $0.00 $200,000.00 $65,000.00 $5,000.00 $25,000.00 $0.00 $5,000.00 $3,500.00 $5,000.00 $15,000.00 $373,500.00

$1,386,756.66

$1,440,458.72

GENERAL & CAPITAL FUND TOTALS

24

BUDGET 2021

$1,251,835.33

$1,369,042.53

Fayston Expense 2021

P&L COMPARISON & CHART

25

26

Total Un-Budgeted Income TOTAL REVENUE

-

$1,230,200.30 $166,566.99 $842,943.13

$0.00 $10,038.50 $0.00 $0.00 $10,038.50 $230,728.68

$67,390.90 $38,178.00 $6,739.20 $12,041.45 $15,642.38 $8,140.00 $2,155.00 $7,885.00 $18,043.50 $28,709.74 $10,339.01 $4,000.00 $1,426.00 $220,690.18

ACTUAL 2018

Does Not Take Into Account Un-Budgeted Income

$1,275,397.05 $79,048.00 $975,285.47

$29,000.00 $10,055.50 $21,609.01 $0.00 $60,664.51 $281,728.09

$67,993.86 $41,822.00 $8,923.45 $11,995.33 $15,393.60 $8,140.00 $3,222.71 $10,224.39 $26,152.15 $6,465.97 $11,792.12 $4,000.00 $4,938.00 $221,063.58

ACTUAL 2019

Grant Funds Offset By Grant Expenses #5087

Designated For Record Preservation Only

$1,228,988.00 $232,456.00 $761,491.99

$0.00 $10,005.00 $0.00 $0.00 $10,005.00 $245,045.01

$67,406.46 $39,876.00 $5,581.70 $22,258.32 $15,891.16 $7,400.00 $2,327.00 $11,747.60 $22,577.22 $25,548.56 $8,694.99 $4,000.00 $1,731.00 $235,040.01

ACTUAL 2017

Designated For Reappraisal Reserve Only

$1,147,738.00 $232,456.00 $915,282.00

$67,000.00 $42,000.00 $2,800.00 $15,000.00 $16,000.00 $7,400.00 $2,500.00 $6,400.00 $20,000.00 $6,500.00 $0.00 $4,000.00

BUDGET 2017

*

$1,168,599.98 $172,800.50 $783,560.88

$0.00 $9,979.00 $0.00 $0.00 $9,979.00 $222,217.60

$67,426.21 $44,329.00 $4,764.16 $14,471.76 $16,139.94 $7,400.00 $2,433.00 $5,477.00 $22,364.93 $11,914.60 $9,686.00 $4,000.00 $1,832.00 $212,238.60

ACTUAL 2016

REVENUE ESTIMATES

**

$1,117,498.79 $87,678.69 $1,117,498.79

$10,758.34

$67,448.57 $43,370.00 $5,101.20 $17,045.81 $16,388.72 $7,400.00 $2,661.00 $7,463.90 $22,459.10 $14,618.17 $10,261.30 $4,000.00 $1,854.00

ACTUAL 2015

TOTAL REVENUE NEEDED (Capital and General Funds) FUND BALANCE USED TO REDUCE TAXES NEEDED TAXES NEEDED TO BE RAISED**** * ** *** *** ****

4049 - ZONING FINES STATE AID - REAPPRAISAL* 4012/4013 - GRANT FUNDS*** 4601 - CTCV COVID Elections Grant

4010 - STATE AID - HIGHWAY 4700 - CURRENT USE 4075/4065 - INTEREST GENERAL FUND & CD 4052 - INTEREST DELINQUENT TAX 4805 - PILOT (PMT IN LIEU OF TAXES) 4050- WAITSFIELD ROAD WORK 4020/4025/4035 - LICENSES (LIQUOR/MARRIAGE/DOG) 4043/4048 - PERMITS (EW & ZONING) 4042 - FEES (RECORDING/COPIES) 4040/4041 - MISCELLANEOUS (OTHER/HALL RENTAL) 4054 DELINQUENT TAX PENALTIES 4015 - GMVS 4036 - RECORD RESTORATION FUNDS** Total Budgeted Income

15 REVENUE ESTIMATES.xls

$1,302,482.00 $15,998.91 $1,078,783.09

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $207,700.00

$68,000.00 $40,000.00 $6,200.00 $12,000.00 $15,000.00 $11,500.00 $2,600.00 $9,400.00 $20,000.00 $7,000.00 $10,000.00 $4,000.00 $2,000.00 $207,700.00

BUDGET 2020

$1,332,482.00 $45,000.00 $1,035,397.89

$0.00 $10,072.50 $12,205.00 $3,196.47 $25,473.97 $252,084.11

$70,004.27 $44,443.00 $4,113.66 $12,580.12 $15,393.60 $11,500.00 $2,129.00 $9,536.00 $30,645.31 $1,426.39 $12,210.79 $4,000.00 $8,628.00 $226,610.14

ACTUAL 2020

$1,369,092.53 $46,000.00 $1,115,031.29

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,803.53 $1,803.53 $208,061.24

$70,000.00 $40,000.00 $6,200.00 $12,000.00 $15,000.00 $11,057.71 $2,600.00 $9,400.00 $20,000.00 $3,500.00 $10,000.00 $4,500.00 $2,000.00 $206,257.71

BUDGET 2021

$1,369,042.53 $46,000.00 $1,062,955.71

$0.00 $10,140.50 $0.00 $0.00 $10,140.50 $260,086.82

$74,712.10 $48,730.00 $2,683.80 $17,898.20 $15,393.60 $11,057.71 $1,977.00 $12,940.50 $35,254.05 $3,880.75 $10,792.56 $4,500.00 $10,126.05 $249,946.32

ACTUAL 2021

$1,440,458.72 $46,500.00 $1,176,284.72

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $217,674.00

$72,000.00 $45,000.00 $4,500.00 $12,000.00 $15,000.00 $11,174.00 $2,600.00 $10,400.00 $24,000.00 $3,500.00 $9,000.00 $4,500.00 $4,000.00 $217,674.00

BUDGET 2022

CAPITAL BUDGET AND PROGRAM

Town of Fayston – Capital Budget and Program 2022-2027 PURPOSE: Municipalities are authorized to adopt capital budgets and programs under 24 VSA Section 4430, the Municipal and Regional Planning and Development Act, provided a facilities and services plan has been adopted as part of the town plan. Such a plan has been adopted by the Town of Fayston. The purposes of the capital budget and program are:    

To stabilize the tax rate; To improve municipal management practices; To enable orderly growth and development consistent with the town’s fiscal ability to provide facilities and services, in accordance with the town plan; and To anticipate facility and service problems and take advantage of opportunities for service efficiencies

PROCESS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF A CAPITAL BUDGET AND PROGRAM: 1. Identification of Capital Projects A Capital project is any major, nonrecurring expenditure, such as land or road equipment purchase, or building construction or improvement. These differ from regular ongoing operating expenses such as salaries, utilities, road maintenance, etc. According to Vermont’s law, “a capital budget shall list and describe the capital projects to be undertaken during the coming fiscal year, the estimated cost of those projects, and the proposed method of financing. A capital program is a plan of capital projects proposed to be undertaken during each of the following five years, the estimated cost of those projects, and the proposed method of financing.” (24 VSA Section4430) To develop Fayston’s capital program, the Selectmen identified the capital projects they anticipate over the next six years. Among their considerations were condition of present equipment, equipment needs, new growth requirements, and facilities to store additional equipment. 2. Financial Analysis In order to determine Fayston’s capacity to finance future capital expenditures, a financial analysis of the Town’s expenditures and revenues was developed. Trends in expenditures, both operating and capital since 2011 were studied. Types of expenditures – roads, schools, fire and police and in general administration – were broken out to identify where growth is occurring. Changes in the grand list, tax rate and other sources of revenue were also analyzed. Based on past trends, as adjusted, projections were made of the Town’s future revenue base and operating expenditures to the year 2027. Capital project costs and grand list growth (the major revenue base) and given in today’s dollar. Debt service already committed to by the Town was factored into the projections as well. A tax rate was applied to the projected grand list to estimate future revenues. By subtracting projected operating costs, and estimate of revenue available for capital expenditures was derived. These calculations are contained in the Appendix. 3. Budget and Program Capital projects were programed according to the expected timing of their need. The method of funding for the projects (outright purchase, short term notes, reserve fund, etc.) was based on municipal financial practices and the ability of the budget to absorb expenditures. In other words, if a project would result in a major increase in the tax rate for one year, phasing of the expenditure either by funding through a note, depreciation account, or reserve fund was proposed. The result is a more even distribution of annual expenditures by the municipalities and a more stable tax rate.

27

CAPITAL BUDGET AND PROGRAM ADOPTION OF THE CAPITAL BUDGET AND PROGRAM: The capital budget and program is adopted in accordance with the provisions of 24 VSA Section 4404 (a) of the Municipal and Regional Planning and Development Act. This section requires at least one public hearing by the Selectmen and filing of the proposal with the Town Clerk and Secretary of the Planning Commission at least 15 days prior to the hearing. The Planning Commission may submit a report the Selectmen on the proposal prior to the hearing. The capital budget and program is then adopted by an act of the legislative body promptly after the final public hearing. PROCESS FOR USE AND UPDATING A CAPITAL BUDGET PROGRAM: As the Selectmen prepare their budget for Town Meeting, the first year of the capital program is reviewed for inclusion as the capital budget for that year. Adjustments are made as necessary to the capital budget to reflect more recent cost data and any changes in financing. The projections for operating expenses and grand list used in developing the program should be weighed against actual experience and modified as necessary. At the same time as the budget is prepared, other capital items in the program should be reviewed. If there are any changes in these items they can be made at this time. Examples of changes are deferral of a project due to unforeseen priority needs or financial constraints, and additions to the program. Each year as the capital budget is finalized, one more year is added to the capital program. Suggestions for new capital projects should be solicited from the planning commission and the road commissioner. As the capital projects are added, consideration should be given to the method of financing them. Projections of operating expenditures and debt service should be extended at the same time to determine the effect of any capital items on the budget for the additional year. FORMAT FOR THE CAPITAL BUDGET AND PROGRAM: The chart on the following page represents the Fayston Capital Budget and Program for the period 2022-2027. The chart lists capital projects which is a list of the Town’s anticipated capital needs, including various road equipment, road and bridge improvements, town buildings, and reserve accounts. A cost is listed for each item in columns representing the years within the program period. A total dollar amount for capital expenditures is provided by year. Contributions to depreciation accounts and reserve funds present the timing and number of proposed “deposits” to reserve funds for various anticipated capital projects. The capital projects for 2022 in the Town Report will show the NET total amount of capital expenditures proposed and represent in the year’s capital expenditures, minus revenues take from existing reserve funds, plus revenues deposited in reserve funds. PURCHASES & EQUIPMENT FCC CONSERVATION FUND ROAD CONSTRUCTION ROAD RETREATMENT EQUPMENT RESERVE FIRE EQUIPMENT RESERVE BRIDGE RESERVE TOWN GARAGE RESERVE REAPPRAISAL RESERVE TOWN FOREST RESERVE CULVERT RESERVE

28

2022 3,500 50,000 0 200,000 65,000 5,000 5,000 25,000 15,000 5,000 373,500

2023 3,500 50,000 90,000 200,000 65,000 5,000 5,000 25,000 15,000 20,000 478,500

2024 3,500 50,000 90,000 200,000 65,000 5,000 5,000 25,000 15,000 20,000 478,500

2025 3,500 50,000 90,000 200,000 65,000 5,000 5,000 25,000 15,000 20,000 478,500

2026 3,500 50,000 90,000 200,000 65,000 5,000 5,000 25,000 15,000 20,000 478,500

2027 3,500 50,000 90,000 200,000 65,000 5,000 5,000 25,000 15,000 20,000 478,500

29

ROAD DEPARTMENT 2018 JOHN DEER TRACTOR/MOWER 2017 DODGE 5500 2017 HYDRO SEEDER 2016 LOADER 2021 ??? New truck 2015 WESTERN STAR TRUCK 2013 WESTERN STAR TRUCK 2009 INTERNATIONAL TRUCK 2004 GRADER 2009 GMC PICKUP 2011 BACKHOE MISC. TOOLS & EQUIPMENT TOTAL

REAL PROPERTY MUNICIPAL BUILDING & LAND (6.7AC) N. FAYSTON & AIRPORT ROADS (.10AC) TOWN GARAGE & LAND (7.2AC) GRAVEL PIT & CAMP (40.6AC) BASSETT HILL ROAD (12.4AC) MILL BROOK ROAD STORE (1AC) MILL BROOK ROAD (.30AC) HENRYS WAY (7.5AC) POST OFFICE ROAD (3.88AC) SCHOOL (7AC) GERMAN FLATS ROAD (.25AC) GERMAN FLATS ROAD (CHASE BROOK) & BARN (73.34AC) CEMETERIES (3) TOWN FOREST (92AC) BOYCE ROAD TOTAL

$65,577.00 $12,840.00 $122,760.00 $104,370.93 $69,179.40 $50,410.76 $36,715.84 $0.00 $47,351.39 $18,000.00 $527,205.33

$136,400.00 $115,967.70 $76,866.00 $56,011.96 $40,795.38 $12,833.95 $52,612.66 $20,000.00 $511,487.65

$3,531,400.00

$3,282,200.00 2017

$1,614,300.00 $9,300.00 $274,500.00 $4,800.00

$1,465,000.00 $9,300.00 $274,700.00 $4,800.00

2016

2017 $647,500.00 $200.00 $342,300.00 $395,900.00 $106,600.00 $50,400.00 $7,100.00 $78,500.00

2016 $589,200.00 $200.00 $316,700.00 $390,400.00 $95,900.00 $50,400.00 $7,100.00 $78,500.00

2021 FIXED ASSETS FIXED ASSETS

$93,933.84 $62,261.46 $45,369.69 $33,044.26 $0.00 $42,616.25 $16,200.00 $577,984.80

2018 $103,500.00 $59,019.30 $11,556.00 $110,484.00

$3,531,400.00

$1,614,300.00 $9,300.00 $274,500.00 $4,800.00

2018 $647,500.00 $200.00 $342,300.00 $395,900.00 $106,600.00 $50,400.00 $7,100.00 $78,500.00

$84,540.45 $56,035.31 $40,832.72 $29,739.83 $0.00 $38,354.63 $14,580.00 $520,186.32

2019 $93,150.00 $53,117.37 $10,400.40 $99,435.60

$3,531,400.00

$1,614,300.00 $9,300.00 $274,500.00 $4,800.00

2019 $647,500.00 $200.00 $342,300.00 $395,900.00 $106,600.00 $50,400.00 $7,100.00 $78,500.00

$76,086.41 $50,431.78 $36,749.45 $26,765.85 $0.00 $34,519.17 $13,122.00 $468,167.69

2020 $83,835.00 $47,805.63 $9,360.36 $89,492.04

$1,614,300.00 $9,300.00 $274,500.00 $4,800.00 $500,200.00 $4,031,600.00

2020 $647,500.00 $200.00 $342,300.00 $395,900.00 $106,600.00 $50,400.00 $7,100.00 $78,500.00

$68,477.77 $45,388.60 $33,074.50 $24,089.26 $0.00 $31,067.25 $11,809.80 $421,350.92

2021 $75,451.50 $43,025.07 $8,424.32 $80,542.84

2021 $647,500.00 $200.00 $342,300.00 $395,900.00 $106,600.00 $50,400.00 $7,100.00 $78,500.00 $69,000.00 $1,614,300.00 $9,300.00 $274,500.00 $4,800.00 $500,200.00 $4,100,600.00

30

ARTICLES ON TOWN MEETING WARNING Mad River Rec District stewardMRV

JOSLIN LIBRARY MAD RIVER RECREATION DISTRICT

$59,112.00

$88,760.00

$25,672.00 $30,000.00 $70,672.00

$91,010.00

$25,672.00 $30,000.00 $74,672.00

$73,232.00

$26,244.00 $30,000.00 $56,244.00

$87,232.00

$67,079.00

$25,224.00 $15,000.00 $40,224.00

TOTAL

$57,254.00

$24,591.00 $23,500.00 $48,091.00

Approved 2021 Approved 2022 $500.00 $500.00 $300.00 $300.00 $500.00 $500.00 $3,000.00 $3,450.00 $300.00 $300.00 $100.00 $100.00 $200.00 $200.00 $588.00 $588.00 $100.00 $100.00 $7,000.00 $7,000.00 $150.00 $150.00 $1,400.00 $1,400.00 $100.00 $100.00 $200.00 $300.00 $300.00 $100.00 $100.00 $250.00 $250.00 $1,200.00 $1,200.00 $250.00 $250.00 $16,338.00 $16,988.00

SUB TOTAL

$55,590.00

$22,666.00 $15,000.00 $37,666.00

$1,200.00 $250.00 $18,088.00

$100.00 $300.00 $100.00

Approved 2020 $500.00 $600.00 $500.00 $3,000.00 $300.00 $100.00 $200.00 $588.00 $100.00 $7,000.00 $150.00 $1,400.00

$10,000.00 $4,000.00 $14,000.00

TOTAL

$22,552.00 $12,500.00 $35,052.00

NAME Approved 2016 Approved 2017 Approved 2018 Approved 2019 AMERICAN RED CROSS $500.00 $500.00 $500.00 $500.00 CENTRAL VT. ADULT BASIC EDUCATION $600.00 CENTRAL VT. COUNCIL ON AGING $500.00 $500.00 $500.00 $500.00 CENTRAL VT. HOME HEALTH & HOSPICE $2,700.00 $2,700.00 $2,700.00 $3,000.00 CIRCLE (FKA Battered Women's Service) $300.00 $300.00 $300.00 $300.00 FAMILY CTR. OF WASHINGTON COUNTY $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 GOOD BEGINNINGS OF CENTRAL VERMONT GREEN MOUNTAIN TRANSIT AGENCY $588.00 $588.00 $588.00 $588.00 GREEN UP VERMONT $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 MAD RIVER SENIORS $7,000.00 $7,000.00 $7,000.00 $7,000.00 MOSAIC (FKA Sexual Assault Crisis Team) $100.00 $150.00 $150.00 $150.00 MRV PUBLIC ACCESS TV - CHANNEL 44 $1,400.00 $1,400.00 $1,400.00 $1,400.00 OUR HOUSE OF CENTRAL VERMONT PEOPLE'S HEALTH & WELNESS CLINIC $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 VT. ASSOCIATION FOR BLIND & VISUALLY IMPAIRED $300.00 $300.00 $300.00 $300.00 VT. CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 VT. FAMILY NETWORK WASHINGTON COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH $1,200.00 $1,200.00 $1,200.00 $1,200.00 YOUTH SERVICE BUREAU/BOYS & GIRLS CLUB $250.00 $250.00 $250.00 $250.00 SUB TOTAL $20,538.00 $19,588.00 $18,988.00 $18,888.00

Request For Funds 2022

REQUEST FOR FUNDS

FRIENDS OF THE MAD RIVER

Friends of the Mad River is a nonprofit organization dedicated to stewarding the Mad River watershed’s healthy land and clean water for our community and for future generations. We build diverse partnerships of neighbors, businesses, towns, and other organizations. Together, we learn about the health of the land and water; conserve our natural resources; and celebrate this special place. In 2021, with the help of municipal, agency, and non-profit partners, Friends of the Mad River sustained our 31 year commitment to the Mad River Valley community by:  Launching a new Mad River Watch program to inform a more complete story about the health of the Mad River in the context of a changing climate;  Working with 18 property owners to ‘spongify’ their homes and yards, absorbing the impact of storms and reducing costly erosion;  Planting 300 trees and shrubs at four sites to build Riparian Restoration benefits like clean water, flood resilience, and wildlife habitat;  Engaging 19 teams of volunteers, ages 2 to 82, to record data and observe nature at 21 sites across the watershed;  Collaborating with recreational Steward MRV partners to take better care of trail and river access points and instill and ethic of stewardship among visitors and residents alike;

Not only are we collecting water samples and doing testing, but this is really a year about connecting to the place and noticing what stays the same and changes. For me, it's about bringing the little ones here and really establishing a connection to the place and that sense of place that is so valuable." Tyne Pike-Sprenger, Mad River Watch Volunteer

 Championing environmental priorities for the Mad River Valley, with a special focus on climate resilience and clean water, in over 100 local, regional and statewide meetings and conversations;  Supporting the Ridge to River taskforce of municipal and community leaders as they advance their action plan for keeping water clean and reducing flood vulnerabilities, including finalizing 5 engineering designs for problematic road sections in Fayston and Warren;  And, providing technical assistance to Mad River Valley select boards, conservation commissions, road crews, and individual landowners as they carefully steward watershed resources. If you have enjoyed a cooling dip in the river, or a peaceful walk in deep woods, or appreciated the simplicity and power of a forest re-growing in place of lawn, please know that the work of Friends of the Mad River is embedded in those moments. This work would not be possible without town leaders and staff dedicated to making thoughtful decisions, committed and hearty volunteers, donors who believe in the value of our work, and a community committed to one another. Thank you! Staff: Corrie Miller, Executive Director; Ira Shadis, Stewardship Manager; Lisa Koitzsch, MRW Coordinator Board of Directors: Ned Farquhar, President  Matt Williams, Vice President  Sucosh Norton, Treasurer Kinny Perot, Secretary  Richard Czaplinski  Rebecca Diehl  Eve Frankel  Jeannie Nicklas  Grady O’Shaughnessy  Amy Polaczyk  Brian Shupe  Katie Sullivan More information at: FriendsoftheMadRiver.org

31

JOSLIN MEMORIAL LIBRARY JOSLIN MEMORIAL LIBRARY 2021 proved to be another challenging year for the Library, as it has for us all. We were forced to close our doors for its first five months. However–as we did in 2020—the Library created ways for our patrons to access our services: We kept our curbside pick-up option, increased our ebook & audiobook collections, increased the availability of Kanopy (our movie streaming site), installed outdoor WIFI, & more! Our patrons moved right along with us, checking out nearly 9,000 items. Once we opened our doors again in early June, things felt back to normal. While that was certainly not the case, we still had over 3,500 patrons come through our doors. We are grateful for each of those visits. In November, the Library received a $4,091 ARPA (American Rescue Plan Act) Grant. The grant is intended to–in part–help update the space & equipment for safe operations, & to expand programming possibilities, with the overall goal of improving & increasing services. The Library has used approximately half of the funds in purchasing two Molekule Air Purifiers. These incredible purifiers use PECO (Photo Electrochemical Oxidation) technology to destroy the widest range of pollutants compared to traditional purifiers—including SARS-CoV-2. PECO destroys pollutants 1000x smaller than what the HEPA standard even tests for. With these purifiers now in place in the building (one upstairs, one downstairs), we are able to offer the safest possible environment that we can for our patrons & for our community. The remaining funds are intended to be used on several sets of Adirondack chairs & tables, which will be placed in the park directly adjacent to the Library. These chairs & tables will provide a functional place for the community to access & utilize our free outdoor WIFI, have meetings, do homework, or just enjoy some quiet moments for years to come. In October, the Library hired Valley resident Shevonne Travers as its new program coordinator. The Board of Trustees created this position to better allow for the creation & implementation of dynamic programming, & to give me more time to focus on the day to day operations of the Library. Going forward into 2022 & beyond, the Library looks forward to many meaningful offerings for the community, both on its own & in coordination with the Warren Public & Moretown Memorial Libraries. I’d like to close by reiterating how thankful we are to have been able to serve this community during the past year. You all have adapted along with us during these trying times to help keep the Library an important & necessary place. We look forward to seeing our Library continue to grow along with you into the future! Respectfully Submitted, Jason Butler, Library Director. Indeed, resilience in the face on these ongoing challenges has been the style of this community, and the Library is proud to

32

CENTRAL VT. REGIONAL PLANNING COMMIMSSION

CENTRAL VERMONT REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION FY21 ANNUAL REPORT -- TOWN OF FAYSTON

The Central Vermont Regional Planning Commission is a consortium of 23 towns and cities in Washington County and western Orange County. The Commission provides planning, development, and project implementation assistance to communities. All municipalities in the region are entitled to equal voting representation by a locally appointed member to the governing Board of Commissioners.

FY21 Fayston Activities

 Confirmed Town planning process and approved Municipal Plan, providing the Town with increased competitiveness for grants.  Provided research regarding municipal ordinance adoption.  Provided energy efficiency information that allows Town to track progress its energy goals.  Presented to the Mad River Valley Energy Coordinators on energy planning and data.  Participated in the Mad River Valley Planning District Steering Committee.

Regional Commissioner Russ Bowen Transportation Advisory Committee Don Simonini

CVRPC Projects & Programs

 Municipal plan and bylaw updates: Focus on predictable and effective local permitting through education, bylaw modernization, and plan updates.  Brownfields: Complete environmental site assessments so properties can be sold, developed or redeveloped to benefit the community, stimulate the economy, create/protect jobs and increase housing opportunities.  Transportation planning: Coordinate local involvement in transportation decisions through the Transportation Advisory Committee and provide studies, plans, data collection, and counts.  Emergency planning: Better prepare our region and state for disasters by coordinating with local volunteers and the state on emergency planning, exercises, and training.  Energy conservation and development: Foster projects that support energy conservation to save energy and tax dollars and identify opportunities for renewable energy generation.  Natural resource planning and projects: Implement activities to protect water resources/supplies, enhance recreational opportunities, maintain the forest products industry, and enhance environmental health.  Regional plans: Coordinate infrastructure, community development, and growth at the regional level through the development, adoption, and implementation of a regional plan.  Geographic Information System services: Provide municipalities, state agencies, and regional groups with mapping and data analysis in support of their projects.  Special projects: Complete special projects, such as downtown revitalization, recreation paths, farmland preservation, economic development, and affordable housing projects.  Grants: Identify appropriate grant sources, define project scopes, write applications, and manage projects. The Commission has no regulatory or taxing authority; each year, we request a per capita assessment from our members in support of local and regional planning activities and to help offset costs and provide local matching funds needed for state and federal funding. Your continued support for local and regional planning is appreciated! CVRPC is your resource -- please contact us at 802-229-0389 or [email protected] for assistance.

33

CENTRAL VT. HOME HEALTH & HOSPICE

Community Relations and Development

2021 ANNUAL SERVICE REPORT FAYSTON

Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice (CVHHH) is a full-service, not-for-profit Visiting Nurse Association that provides intermittent, short-term medical care, education, and support at home to help Central Vermonters recover from an illness, surgery, or hospital stay and manage their chronic disease. We serve 23 communities in Washington and Orange Counties and care for people of all ages. Our services include home care, hospice, and maternal-child health care. We also offer public foot-care and flu vaccine clinics and COVID-19 vaccinations at home. In addition, we offer long-term care and private care services and free grief support groups. CVHHH is guided by a mission to care for all Central Vermonters regardless of a person’s ability to pay, their geographic remoteness, or the complexity of their care needs. CVHHH embraces new technology and collaborates with other local providers to ensure that central Vermonters’ care needs are met. To learn more, visit www.cvhhh.org.

CVHHH Services to the Residents of Fayston Jan 1, 2021 – December 31, 2021* Program Home Health Care

# of Visits 280

Hospice Care

4

Long Term Care

0

Maternal Child Health

0

TOTAL VISITS/CONTACTS

284

TOTAL PATIENTS

31

TOTAL ADMISSIONS

32

*Audited figures are not available at the time of report submission. These preliminary figures are prorated based on the number of visits from January 1, 2021 – September 30, 2021 and are not expected to vary significantly.

Town funding is imperative in ensuring that CVHHH will provide services in Fayston through 2022 and beyond. For more information contact Sandy Rousse, President & CEO, or Kim Farnum, Director of Community Relations & Development at 223-1878. 34 600 Granger Road, Barre VT 05641

| p: 802.223.1878 | f: 802.223.6835| www.cvhhh.org

GREEN MOUNTAIN TRANSIT

Town of Fayston FY21 Annual Report Who We Are GMT is the public transportation provider for the northwest and central regions of Vermont, offering a variety of services to the communities in which we serve. GMT is proud to offer traditional public transportation services like commuter, deviated fixed routes and demand response shuttles, while providing individualized services such as shopping and health care shuttles, Medicaid, Elderly and Disabled services to both urban and rural communities. Our Services Individual Special Service Transportation GMT provides essential medical and non-medical transportation service to those who qualify for Medicaid, Elderly and Disabled, non-Medicaid medical, human service and/or critical care funds. We offer individual coordinated services for those who qualify and who are in need of scheduled rides through GMT volunteer drivers, special shuttle service or general public routes. ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Health Care Services Meal Site/Senior Programs Adult Day Care Services VT Association of the Blind Health Care Services

Prescription & Shopping Social Services Radiation & Dialysis Treatments Central VT Substance Abuse Prescription & Shopping

General Public Transportation GMT also provides traditional general public transportation service directly supporting the increasing demand for affordable commuter and essential daily needs transportation solutions. In FY21, total GMT ridership was 129,103. This general public transportation ridership was in addition to Special Service ridership, (above), and is available through a variety of services including: ▪ ▪ ▪

Deviated Fixed Routes Local Commuter Routes Local Shopping Shuttles

▪ ▪ ▪

Health Care Shuttles Demand Response Service Regional Commuters to Chittenden and Caledonia Counties

Mad River Valley Bus Service Since 1998, GMT has been serving the Mad River Valley and has provided an average of 50,000 trips per season through its service to the Valley, Sugarbush Resort and Mad River Glen. GMT is proud to offer numerous fixed-deviated fare free service and the Snow Cap Commuter during winter ski season to support the local economy and a healthy environment. In addition to State, Federal and local funds to support this local service, GMT relies on generous support from the resorts, inns and restaurants we serve.

35

GREEN MOUNTAIN TRANSIT GMT Volunteer Driver Program In addition to shuttle vehicles, GMT uses an extensive network of Volunteer Drivers to provide coordinated and caring rides throughout our rural service area. Volunteer Drivers are essential in providing cost effective and community driven services, and are the foundation of our special services. Drivers are reimbursed for the miles they drive and provide services under the management of GMT. Thank You Thank you to Fayston taxpayers and officials for your continued financial support of GMT s public transportation service and for your commitment to efficient transportation solutions. Information lease feel free to contact amie Smith, Director of lanning and Marketing with questions or to request additional information on GMT services at 80 -5 0-1098 or amie RideGMT.com.

Bear Print - Photo by Sarah Stavray

101 Queen City Park Road, Burlington, VT 05401 | T: 802-864-2282 F: 802-864-5564 6088 VT Route 12, Berlin, VT 05602 | T: 802-223-7287 F: 802-223-6236 375 Lake Road, Suite 5, St. Albans, VT 05478 | T: 802-527-2181 F: 802-527-5302

36

GREEN UP VERMONT

GREEN UP VERMONT www.greenupvermont.org

Green Up Day May 7, 2022

Green Up Day on May 1, 2021 was a huge success thanks to nearly 22,000 volunteers statewide who Greened Up. The infographic shows that all your hard work to beautify Vermont is needed and that it makes where we get to live, work, and play a very special place. As one of Vermont’s favorite holidays, it is imperative for today and for future generations to keep building pride, awareness, and stewardship for a clean Vermont environment. Support from your municipality is essential to our program. Funds help pay for Green Up Day supplies, promotional outreach, and educational resources including activity books, contests for kids, and a $1,000 scholarship. Along with Green Up Day, we work year-round to further our impact with waste reduction initiatives, additional clean-up efforts, and educational programs. Green Up Vermont is a private nonprofit organization that relies on your town’s support to execute the tradition of cleaning up our roads and waterways, while promoting civic pride, and community engagement. Thank you for your support of this crucial program that takes care of all our cities and towns. Your donations make a huge impact and can be made on Line 23 of the Vermont State Income Tax Form or anytime online at www.greenupvermont.org. Visit our website, like us on Facebook (@greenupvermont), and follow us on Instagram (greenupvermont). [email protected] 229-4586 37

MAD RIVER AMBULANCE "The Mission of the Mad River Valley Ambulance Service is to provide the five Mad River Valley towns of Fayston, North Fayston, Moretown, Waitsfield and Warren the highest quality of Emergency Medical Services utilizing dedicated volunteers, technology and community support." Imagine living in the beautiful Mad River Valley without being confident you could get to a hospital if needed? For over 50 years, the men and women of the Mad River Valley Ambulance Service (MRVAS) have volunteered to care for their neighbors in times of their greatest need. Through rain and snow, at dawn and late into the night, MRVAS volunteers have left work or the comfort of their own homes and missed celebrations and meetings to dispatch calls, jump into emergency vehicles and save lives. At any given time, 70 highly‐trained and dedicated volunteers donate 60 or more hours of their time each month to make the Mad River Valley a better place to live. It’s hard to imagine that type of commitment, but MRVAS volunteers make their community a priority year in and year out. MRVAS is one of only a handful of all‐volunteer squads left in Vermont. Many services have closed after being unable to raise funds and recruit enough volunteers. In many of those towns, taxpayers saw taxes raised to pay for emergency services. Through a history of local outreach, MRVAS has managed to continue while also recruiting and training volunteers to meet community needs. MRVAS has had to spend $600,000 in the last three years to replace two aging ambulances. Our third ambulance is fourteen years old, and is scheduled to be replaced this year. In most years, MRVAS responds to 500+ calls for help. MRVAS must maintain the capacity to put three vehicles and crews on the road simultaneously. With three emergency vehicles, MRVAS handles approximately 98% of all calls without requesting the assistance of other agencies. This is critical to the well‐being of our community and visitors, as requests for outside assistance can add 20 minutes or more to response times. Two calls within a three‐hour period is a common happening and as round-trip calls are typically 3 hours, MRVAS must have three vehicles so one is always at the ready. At MRVAS, we take our training seriously; keeping up with frequent changes in state protocol and medical care, as well as the evolving needs of our growing community. Training is no easy task and requires numerous additional hours per year to stay certified, even after the initial training investment. We strive to incorporate and utilize the latest technology; incorporating innovations such as “Active 911” and EMS Manager” in order to communicate well and to provide clear, efficient, rapid response to any given location. Wouldn’t you like to become a member of MRVAS? We are always happy to bring new members onto our squad and to provide them with the necessary training! If you feel that serving your community in this way would enrich your life (as it has ours), please visit our website (www.mrvas.org) or call 496-8888 for further information.

38

MAD RIVER AMBULANCE Do keep in mind that MRVAS uses the E-911 system in its response, and that we look for E-911 numbers posted near your residences when responding to emergencies. Take a moment to reflect on the following: If you needed us in an emergency, is your location clearly marked? If not, help us help you! MRVAS is happy to offer E-911 Reflective Address Number Signs for $20. You can pick up a form at your local Town Office or call us for further info at: 802-496-8888. Finally, we would like to thank you, the residents of this Mad River Valley, as well as second homeowners and visitors for supporting our dedicated staff of volunteers. It is your generous donations and subscriptions for service that allow us to continue to function as a team of professionals. It continues to be our pleasure and honor to serve you. Feel free to visit our website (www.mrvas.org) or call us if you have questions. Respectfully, Sara Van Schaick, A-EMT President and Head of Service

t

en - Photo by Sarah Stavra y

39

MAD RIVER PATH ASSOCIATION

Get Into the Valley’s Great Outdoors! Recrea'on. Health. Connec'ons. Mad River Path P.O. Box 683 Waitsfield, VT 05673 [email protected]

2021 Annual Overview In 2021, MRP completed several path projects, added path-side infrastructure and ameniEes, repaired one of the network’s largest bridges, conEnued vegetaEon management, and more! We would like to acknowledge that the work we accomplish each year is thanks to the generous and enthusiasEc Mad River Valley community. The Path crosses more than 30 privately-owned properEes, along with several municipally-owned parcels, and it is because of these generous landowners the Path exists as it does today. More than 200 households and 30 businesses supported MRP in 2021 with financial giOs and product donaEons for the Mad Dash silent aucEon. Plus, dozens of individuals contributed to our successes through volunteering, in-kind contribuEons, and donated construcEon materials. Below is a list of accomplishments from 2021: Projects & Programs

40



Built the new Fiddler’s Walk extension “gateway” to Rt 100 at Irasville Common, which includes a new rain garden to protect a nearby wetland and the Mad River.



Nearly completed a one mile trail loop on Yestermorrow’s property.



Added two new picnic tables along the Path; one at The Swanson Inn and one at the Flemer Field.



Constructed two shelters that house portalets and trash/recycling bins at Lareau Swim Hole parking and Bridge Street parking, which is part of the #stewardMRV iniEaEve.



ConEnued mowing and vegetaEon management program across the path network, including much chainsaw work aOer several windy storms.



Began year three of Irasville winter maintenance along the Heart of the Valley path.



Repaired the Clay Brook bridge aOer it was knocked off its foundaEon from an August storm.



Completed a split-rail fence in downtown Waitsfield to help define the Path on private land.



Installed a beaver baffle with VT F&W to protect the boardwalk and beavers.



Restocked a dozen dog waste bag staEons with more than 5,000 bags across the Path network. Woof woof!



Eradicated invasive honey suckle and giant hogweed throughout the Path network.



ConEnued invasive knotweed management on the AusEn Parcel with Friends of the Mad River, the Town of Waitsfield, and volunteers.



Set up two StoryWalk® displays in partnership with MRV Libraries.



Ran the successful 25th Annual Mad Dash presented by Sugarbush Resort

Planning & ssessments •

IniEated planning for a new one mile path secEon north of Tremblay Rd in Waitsfield, in partnership with the Vermont Land Trust.



Completed the VOREC grant applicaEon with several partners to improve trail connecEons and pedestrians safety in downtown Irasville; this includes significant project planning and new permanent trail easements.



Received funding for a new kiosk at the Flemer Field, awarded by Hunger Mountain Coop.



ConEnued discussions with landowners and partners to complete important gaps in the Warren to Moretown Path and the Irasville to Long Trail trail.



Met with partners to strengthen collaboraEons on trail building and maintenance.



Completed planning for two new path-side shelters and wildlife educaEon panels.



Began permi ng processes for 2021 projects.



Began the process of establishing five new permanent trail easements.

ta Ross Saxton, ExecuEve Director David Hodgson, Trail Manager Board of irectors Rocky Bleier Nancy Browne David Ellison, Treasurer Charlie Hosford Rudy Polwin Bri on Rogers, Vice President Mac Rood, President Harrison Snapp essica Tompkins Pat Travers, Secretary Sue ekas

41

MAD RIVER VALLEY COMMUNITY FUND Mad River Valley Community Fund Annual Report 2021

MRVCF Mission: The Mad River Valley Community Fund assists in providing short-term solutions for families or individuals in crisis while addressing long term systemic community challenges. We provide grants to individuals and support partners in the critical areas of housing, transportation and childcare. This work is funded by individual donors and is done by a board of eight and one part-time staff person. Activity for 2021

68 households served • Transportation $14855 • Childcare $32,663 • Housing $70,398 • Medical $34,939

Partner organizations supported • Transportation $6,468 • Childcare $102,071 • Housing $42,000 • Medical $6,828

Fundraised Income from Winter 2020-2021 = $120,000 Total Giving FY ‘21 = $307,965 2021 Partner Highlights: Transportation MRVCF supports 33.3% of Free Wheelin’s operating budget. This group averages 100 free rides per month with 12 drivers. Childcare MRVCF assisted Neck of the Woods in the purchase of their childcare center and paid to upgrade the water system so that they could be licensed. Forty-five new infant, toddler, and preschool spots were made available. Housing MRVCF financially supported the Mad River Valley Housing Coalition in creating and implementing an accessory dwelling program to add housing units to MRV.

42

MAD RIVER VALLEY HOUSING COALITION

MAD RIVER VALLEY HOUSING COALITION 2021 REPORT The Mad River Valley Housing Coalition (MRVHC) is a registered 501(c)(3) organiza6on. The MRV HC was created to support the planning and produc6on of a wide variety of housing op6ons within the Mad River Valley (MRV) through education, information, advocacy, endorsement, and direct action. In 2021 the MRVHC bolstered its efforts to provide local solutions to the MRV’s lack of housing options. The MRV HC created the Mad River Valley Housing Fund as a repositor for donations made to to the MRV HC. The objectives of the MRV Housing Fund is to (1) leverage funds raised through grants and financing instruments to (2) assist income eligible households to secure and occupy an affordable housing unit, and (3) make grants or loans to assist potential developers, buyers, landlords, and tenants to access, occupy, and create housing units. The MRV HC continued its promoting the Additional Dwelling Unit, ADU, program. While there was significant interest, the current shortage of available contractors and the steeper prices caused much of the interest to pause on plans to move forward with ADU construction. The MRV HC is considering adding incentives to possible ADU development. Unfortunately, the market prevented the MRV HC from meeting its target of 6 units for 2021. The part time Executive Director of the MRV HC has taken a full-time position with a local affordable housing developer. The MRV HC thanks Kaziah Haviland Montgomery for her hard work in reenergizing the MRV HC, wishes her the best in her new position, and looks to working with her in her new role as an affordable housing developer. The MRV HC looks forward to bringing on a new Executive Director who will be charged with implementing the MRV HC strategic plan as well as programs developed in conjunction with the MRV Housing Fund. Thanks is given to all the stakeholders in the Mad River Valley Housing crisis – the MRV Towns, the Mad River Valley Planning District, the Mad River Valley Community Fund, the Warren United Church, and Saint Dunstan’s Episcopal Church. The MRV HC board meets monthly, and all are welcome. Meeting information can be found at MRVHousing.org or on the MRV HC Facebook page or inquiry by email, [email protected] Board Members;

ar ein ay ton a oo ait ie Bob an - arren Perry Bi e o arren Pa Si e ay ton aren in he ay ton har ie o or - ait ie

43

MAD RIVER VALLEY HEALTH CENTER Mad River Valley Health Center Annual Report The Mad River Health Center is a non profit, 501(c)(3) corporation operating under the following Articles of Incorporation: ● To provide a quality facility to ensure the availability of local health care to residents of the Mad River Valley, neighboring communities and visitors. ● Advocate for and support health and wellness in the community. Prior to the construction of the current facility in the early 2000's, the Health Center, since its formation in the 1980s, actually was a Provider of health services with the employment of Dr. Cook. Since his retirement, and the purchase of his practice by CVMC, the Health Center ceased to actually provide health services, but became a provider of Space for the delivery of health related services. Our articles of incorporation were revised accordingly to the above. The Health Center is governed by an all volunteer board of directors. The current board was elected September, 2021: ● Michael Hawker, President ● Don Murray, Vice President ● Bill Zekas, Treasurer ● Suzanne Peterson, Secretary ● Manny Apigian ● Polly Bednash ● Tom Emory ● Joe Grant ● Dick Valentinetti The current providers of the Health Center are: ● Central Vermont Medical Center (primary, non emergency care) ● Hannah's House (mental health services) ● Three Moon's Wellness (acupuncture and Chinese medicine) ● Dr. Richard Davis (psychologist) With the vision and energy of board member Polly Bednash, towards the end of 2021 Covid testing, vaccinations and test kits are now available in the Valley. This effort was a complex task, involving Polly’s rallying the support of, and coordination of, several different organizations: ● Waterbury Ambulance Service ● Vermont Department of Health ● Valley Reporter ● Waitsfield United Church of Christ ● Mad River Valley Ambulance Service In particular, the following individuals were instumental in making this happen: ● Mark Podgwaite (Waterbury Ambulance) ● Mark Wilson (Waitsfield UCC) ● Lisa Loomis (Valley Reporter) Also towards the end of 2021 the Health Center developed a new website (https://mrvhealthcenter.org). This new website contains information about the Health Center, our providers and all things Covid in the Valley. Additional functionality beneficial to Valley residents will be added during the course of the year. The Health Center currently faces two major challenges: ● COVID 19: In our lifetime we have not faced anything like this. Unprecedented demands have been placed on all facets of the health care system. Adjustments from our normal way of operating have had to be made. Some we understand are not easy to live with, but never-the-less are necessary. Furthermore, the overall situation is severely exacerbated by the shortage of health care workers. These constraints are not unique to the Valley. The strains all of this is placing on our community in particular are becoming increasingly more apparent. During the course of Covid we have made significant investments to our air handling systems, beyond the minimum necessary, to help mitigate the spread of this disease, and to better protect our community. ● FACILITY: Our building is approaching 20 years old. We are now facing significant capital expenses associated with this. Specifically, exterior maintenance (repairing rotting woodwork, painting) and replacement of significant parts of our HVAC systems (to be spread out over two years). Fortunately our maintenance reserves built up over the last few years will be enough to cover these expenses. However, due to the age of the building there is always an underlying concern for those things unseen. The Board is taking more proactive measures to prepare for anything untoward. As we move forward in these difficult times, the Board is actively seeking additional ways to support the health and well being of all those who call the Valley home, and for those who come to visit us. Respectively submitted on behalf of the Board of Directors,

44

Michael Hawker, President

MAD RIVER VALLEY PLANNING DISTRICT 2021 ANNUAL REPORT The Mad River Valley Planning District (MRVPD) was created in 1985 by the towns of Fayston, Warren & Waitsfield to carry out a program of planning for the MRV directed toward its physical, social, economic, fiscal, environmental, cultural, and aesthetic wellbeing. To this end, MRVPD provides professional planning, leadership, coordination, awareness, implementation, and grant support to the broad MRV and its member towns. MRVPD focused on a broad range of activities across the region during the past year including, but not limited to, increased pedestrian safety measures, resource and coordination support for housing affordability, stewardMRV collaboration, Town Plan assistance, and completion of the MRV Trailhead Kiosk & Mapping Project. In addition to these efforts, 2021 marked a significant effort by MRVPD to make community data more accessible, usable, and integrated into local decision-making processes. MRV Community Dashboard: Building off its annual MRV Data Report, MRVPD recently launched the MRV Community Dashboard, a new online platform for community members and decision-makers to access, visualize, and track data that is pertinent to the MRV's wellbeing. It also provides context and resources to connect data points to on-the-ground action and support, ensuring that the MRV's needs are being prioritized by defining goals and progress is measurable. The MRV Community Dashboard is available at mrvpd.org. The online Dashboard is organized around a framework of wellbeing for the Mad River Valley, based on town plans, recent MRV visioning efforts, stakeholder input, and similar community indicator projects. The result is an unprecedented community resource that strengthens community capital and resilience while being free and accessible to all. The Dashboard draws from multiple Federal and state-wide data sources, as well as MRVPD’s proprietary data source, the MRV Wellbeing Survey. The Wellbeing Survey was created to fill gaps in local qualitative data and to provide a deeper understanding of how the MRV’s people, environment, and economy are doing. Undertaken in concert with a similar statewide effort, the results provide a longitudinal point of reference and comparison to MRV-level data. The survey was distributed during Spring 2021 and received a response from 8% of Warren, Waitsfield, and Fayston’s residents. Compared with statewide results from 2021, the MRV scored higher in every domain except for Material Wellbeing, which scored equally. The MRV stood out particularly in the realms of Social Connectedness and Education & Culture. Issues of housing, affordability, and opportunities for young people were expressed as real and perceived challenges for respondents. Wellbeing Survey results are housed on the new online MRV Community Dashboard, accessed at mrvpd.org. Survey responses are poised to serve as an important tool for accountability and transparency between elected reps and MRV residents; survey results can improve data-driven decision-making to strengthen Valley-wide wellbeing. MRVPD will be repeating the survey annually in the spring, with a focus on increased respondent population diversity. To be notified of the next round of the MRV Community Survey, sign up for MRVPD’s newsletter at mrvpd.org. Budget: For FY23, MRVPD requests level funding at $45,317 from each of its four funders, Fayston, Waitsfield, Warren, and Sugarbush Resort. MRVPD’s activities are overseen by a 7-voting member Steering Committee, consisting of a representative from the Selectboard and Planning Commission from each of its member towns, and a representative from the MRV Chamber of Commerce. Additionally, representatives from Sugarbush Resort and the Central VT Regional Planning Commission (CVRPC) serve as non-voting members. MRVPD Steering Committee meetings are open to the public and are usually held on the third Thursday of each month at 7 pm. Meeting details at mrvpd.org. Staffing consists of Joshua Schwartz, Executive Director, & Amy Tomasso, Community Planner. Mad River Valley Planning District Steering Committee Bob Ackland, Warren Selectboard (Chair) Christine Sullivan, Waitsfield Selectboard (ViceChair) Jared Cadwell, Fayston Selectboard (Secretary & Treasurer) Dan Raddock, Warren Planning Commission Brian Voigt, Waitsfield Planning Commission

Donald Simonini, Fayston Planning Commission Margo Wade, Sugarbush Resort Eric Friedman, MRV Chamber of Commerce Clare Rock, Central VT Regional Planning Commission

Respectfully Submitted, Joshua Schwartz, Executive Director 496-7173 | [email protected] | mrvpd.org

45

MAD RIVER VALLEY PUBLIC ACCESS TELEVISION CHANNEL 44 Mad River Valley TV 2021 HIGHLIGHTS: A year of adapting to pandemic and recovery allows MRVTV to increase value provided to community. Mad River Valley Television is The Valley’s public access station management organization (AMO). It is dedicated to keeping the community informed about the actions by their towns, schools and elected officials, connected the community with school and local activities and enabling local producers to present views and comment. Its programming has traditionally been available to all within the Waitsfield Cable service coverage area. The station celebrated its 22nd year on the air during 2021 and covered nearly every meeting of the Fayston Select Board, special joint meetings, Conservation Commission, Boyce Hill Town Forest public meetings and meetings of the Mad River Valley Planning District, the Mad River Valley Recreation District and most meetings of the Harwood Unified Union School District board and subcommittees. While 2021 saw progress against the pandemic and many meetings were opened again to the public, most meetings continued to offer virtual connections for those who chose not to attend in person. The ability to watch meetings on MRVTV Channel 45/245 or in replay on MRVTV.com has provided considerable value to the community. MRVTV’s Channels 44/244 (Community) and 45/245 (Municipal) are included in Waitsfield Cable’s basic tier of service. In 2021, MRVTV expanded its availability by streaming the channel in real-time over the Internet. Anyone with or without a cable subscription and anywhere in the world can now watch the content as it appears on our cable channels by going to MRVTV.com and clicking the “watch live” link. This supports the station’s goal of providing local programming for all the Mad River Valley, not only those who subscribe to cable television. At the beginning of the pandemic, the station adjusted its work to provide access to more government meetings, school sports and events that restricted attendance, and local events. Many of these events moved from live to Zoom and we’ve added the capabilities to capture the Zoom and delivered through the cable channel and since July 1, through the real-time stream. MRVTV also focused on providing COVID-19 related information as we can including Governor Scott’s press conferences, and how local businesses including the ski mountains, restaurants and lodging establishments are operating. This year, the station hosted a forum of Select Board candidates that was received over 600 page views. All locally produced programming, from meetings to school and community events is also on the MRVTV website, h*ps://mrvtv.com. Local meetings are commonly viewed from the website with hundreds to over 1000 views of School board meetings and town municipal meetings from MRVTV.com. (Note viewing data from the cable channels is not available from Waitsfield Telecom.) MRVTV is primarily funded by Waitsfield Cable as required by state and federal regulations with 5% of cable subscription fee collected to support local PEG stations. In addition, the towns of Fayston, Waitsfield, Warren and Moretown and in SD provided MRVTV monetary support to help to defray the cost of municipal and school meetings, sporting events and activities. MRVTV makes the web storage of our municipal programming available for all, anytime, even without cable service. The continuation of cable cord cutting and growth of streaming services is reducing cable funding. The station is making up the loss as possible through sponsorships, donations and fundraising activities.

46

To capture more events, the station encourages nonprofits to find a member in their organization who can become a “media person” for coverage. MRVTV has equipment available to the community so the public can produce shows and access the airwaves. MRVTV also has a full studio available for taping shows and welcomes new users and producers for non-commercial community interest programs. In 2021 MRVTV made use of many hours of statewide programming available on the Vermont Media Exchange (VMX). MRVTV showed hundreds of programs produced by other public access centers around the state such as GMALL lectures, Vermont Master Naturalist, Energy Week and other programs highlight the vastness of Vermont in natural beauty and intellectual depth. MRVTV has been a leader in connecting through social media and has continued growth YouTube and Facebook platforms. YouTube subscribers grew to over 11,700 with viewers of the Waitsfield Covered Bridge livecam ranging from Vermont to Japan and beyond! On Facebook, MRVTV has a loyal base of followers with nearly 10,000 likes. MRVTV has more YouTube subscribers and Facebook likes than other public access television stations in Vermont. YouTube Launched 6/30/17 11,723 Subscribers 2.2 million views of our content and 240,000 hours of viewing Facebook 9761 likes MRVTV continues to provide more real-time access to content. The return of the Warren parade provided the opportunity to show it live on the channel and through our newly launched real-time stream. As a result, even if you did not feel comfortable in the crowds, you could join the fun from your home. The station also live-streamed the Harwood Winter concert and Circus Smirkus at Waitsfield Elementary School — each with over 300 page views — and began experimenting with live broadcasts of the municipal meetings. The station also contracted with CVT Sports to deliver streams of Harwood away games to Valley viewers. Station personnel remains unchanged in 2021 with Rob Perry serving as Executive Director and Tony Italiano keeping the station’s programming going as Program/Media Manager, a role he has ably filled for nearly 15 years. The board of directors changed slightly with the retirement of Brian Shupe and the addition of Genevieve Knight. Members of the MRVTV board are: Lisa Loomis, Rob Williams, Liz Levey, Dan Eckstein, John Daniell, Ilse Sigmund, Ian Sweet, Ned Farquhar and Genevieve Knight. We meet quarterly and actively welcome public input to our meetings or to any board member. To learn more how you can be involved with MRVTV, please contact us at 583-4488 (44TV) or by email at [email protected] You also can just stop by our studio offices at the north end of the Village Square Shopping Center. And you can find us, all local programs, our schedules, and lots of affiliated information on the web at https://mrvtv.com.

47

MAD RIVER VALLEY RECREATION DISTRICT

Mad River Valley Recreation District Annual Report Mad River Valley Recreation District (MRVRD) is a Union Municipal District formed by the towns of Waitsfield, Warren and Fayston in 1994. The MRVRD seeks to facilitate, enhance and create recreational opportunities throughout the Mad River Valley that promote community vitality, physical fitness, appreciation for the outdoors and a high quality of life. The MRVRD owns and manages the Mad River Park Recreational Fields, operates a recreation grant program and supports diverse recreation opportunities important for community health and economic vitality in the Valley. In 2021, the MRVRD awarded 12 grants, providing $43,639 in financial support to the organizations listed in the financial report in addition to another grant that was unable to be utilized due to COVID. In January 2022, the MRVRD considered 15 grant requests totaling $80,412 and allocated approximately $43,500 from funds approved by voters in 2021 for new initiatives, long-standing programs, and management of Mad River Park . These investments will increase access to diverse recreational opportunities for all members of our community, as well as visitors. Due to continually increasing demands, MRVRD is requesting $40,000 from each member town in the fiscal year 2022. This represents a $10,000 increase from 2021. These funds will enable the continuation of the recreation grant program, provide for operations and improvements (including an irrigation system at Mad River Park) and enable our new Executive Director, Laura Arnesen, to advance the MRVRD’s strategic organizational goals through recreation trails, events, programming, parks and facilities management and recreation planning. Community benchmarking shows that the MRV’s budget for recreation is 60-70% lower than those of neighboring towns: Bristol spends $307,000 and Waterbury spends $412,000 per year compared to our current $91,500. The MRVRD Board encourages groups and individuals who are interested in creating recreational opportunities in the Mad River Valley to visit mrvrd.org or contact any member of the Board. The board meets the third Tuesday of each month and seeks involvement and input from the community. The volunteer MRVRD board members have been appointed by the Select Boards of their respective towns and serve 1 or 3 year terms. Contact any of us if you are interested in joining the team. Executive Director: Laura Arnesen, Warren Board: Liza Walker, Waitsfield - Chair; Alice Rodgers, Warren - Vice Chair; Doug Bergstein, Warren - Treasurer; Mary Simmons, Waitsfield - Secretary; Molly Bagnato, Fayston; Luke Foley, Waitsfield; Shevonne Travers, Waitsfield - MRP Field Manager; Peter Oliver, Warren; John Stokes, Fayston Take our community survey: www.mrvrd.org

48

Beginning Balance (Jan 1, 2021)

$2,904

Income Funding from Towns Moretown Donations/Credit

$90,000 $1,500 $84

Expenditures Bill Koch League

$2,000

Brooks Field

$345

Couples Club

$3,000

Mad River Park

$8,500

Mad River Path

$5,960

Mad River Riders

$4,660

Mad River Ridge Runners

$4,598

Mad River Soccer

$2,000

Mad Valley Sports, Inc.

$5,000

Skatium

$1,827

Warren SkatePark

$3,942

Wilderness First Aid

$1,000

Executive Director Salary/Benefits

$38,514

Intern Stipend

$1,173

Memberships

$1,030

Website

$3,644

Miscellaneous Total Expenditures

$900 $88,093

Ending Balance (Dec. 31, 2021)

$6,395

Trailhead Kiosk Project Balance

$3,491

Mad River Park Balance Grants Requested for 2022 Projected Grants Awarded for 2022(including Mad River Park)

$315 $80,412 $43,500

MAD RIVER VALLEY SENIOR

Mad River Valley Senior Citizens, Inc. 5308 Main Street, Waitsfield, VT 05673 802-496-2545

2021 TOWN REPORT The Mad River Valley Senior Citizens Board of Directors sincerely appreciates the continued support of the Town of Fayston. With that support, we have been successful in our mission to provide nutritional meals, opportunities for social connections, and access to health and wellness resources for Seniors in our community for over 35 years. In addition to three part-time staff, we are fortunate to have so many caring volunteers who are central to this success. In FY2021 we served 11,000 meals, a 27% increase over previous years, at the senior center dining room in Evergreen Place in WaitsRield and to our Meals On Wheels (MOW) clients in the four towns within our Valley. In a normal year, we serve two weekly community meals for seniors and one community breakfast each week, and deliver daily dietician-approved lunches for MOW clients Rive days a week and frozens for weekends. All meals are by donation except for breakfast, which is a fundraiser. This year has been a challenge with COVID which made it difRicult to consistently provide in-person meals and events. This has made our MOW program even more important to those seniors living alone. We have maintained contact with them throughout the year by phone, offering and delivering take-out meals and increasing our delivery to many who haven’t received MOW before. In addition to donations from patrons and clients, MRVSC receives Rinancial support from the Central Vermont Council On Aging, the four Valley towns, Vermont Center for Independent Living, The Warren United Church, The Mad River Valley Rotary, Mehuron’s, Lawson’s Finest Liquids, Green Rabbit Bakery, The Village Grocery, and other local businesses and individuals that provide us with generous donations, attendance at our fundraisers, and coin collection cans at area retailers. We thank you all for your support. Respectfully Submitted: MRVSC Board of Directors Nancy Emory, President; Sue Stoehr, Treasurer; Joanne Fitzgerald, Secretary; Spencer Potter, MOW coordinator; Michael BransRield, Free Wheelin’ Director; Bill Zekas, Gretchen Hernandez, and Marise Lane. __________________________________________________________________________________

49

MAD RIVERAlliance RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ALLIANCE Mad River Resource Management P.O. Box 210, Waterbury Center VT 05677

(802) 244-7373 / fax (802) 244-7570 January 14, 2021

The Mad River Resource Management Alliance(MRRMA) includes the Towns of Fayston, Moretown, Waitsfield, Warren and Waterbury. The Alliance was formed through an Interlocal Agreement that began in 1994. We changed our name in 2008 to reflect the fact that we are managing resources not wastes. 2020 was certainly a very challenging year in many areas. Due to the pandemic the Alliance cancelled our Spring Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day event at the Harwood Union High School in Duxbury. Our Fall event was held on October 3 2020. A total of 354 households participated in this event. We collected 11.36 tons of household hazardous waste at the event. Residents within the Alliance communities are able to bring all their architectural paints, waste pesticides, alkaline batteries and up to 10 additional gallons of hazardous waste to each event for disposal at no charge. The Alliance will swap your mercury fever thermometer for a digital thermometer at no charge at these events. Bring your mercury thermostats to the Household Hazardous Waste Collection and you will receive a coupon that can be redeemed for a $5.00 rebate by the Thermostat Recycling Corporation which will process the thermostats. Residents can also bring all their compact fluorescent bulbs(CFLs) and up to ten or fewer non-CFL general purpose mercury containing lamps at no charge. We are planning two collection day events in 2021, at Harwood Union High School. They are scheduled for May 8 and October 2, 2021. A total of 219.7 gallons of used crankcase oil was collected within the Alliance at our Used Oil Collection Tank during 2020. The tank is located in Waitsfield at the Earthwise Transfer Station. Grow Compost of Vermont in Moretown collected food scraps and food processing residuals from the Washington West Supervisory Union waste streams, from other large generators in the MRRMA and in collection totes at their Moretown facility. A total of 270 tons of food scraps were collected by Grow Compost of Vermont in 2020 in the MRRMA. Visit our web site at madriverrma.org. You will find information on solid waste issues on this web site. The twenty fourth truckload sale of compost bins resulted in the distribution of 56 compost bins and 8 Green Cones. It is estimated that each compost bin can compost 650 pounds of garden and kitchen waste annually. This means rich soil to add to your garden and less waste to go to the landfill. We held four composting workshops for Alliance residents this year and expect to hold more in 2021. We will hold our twenty fifth Compost Bin Sale this spring. The Alliance held a car and pickup truck tire and metal collection event at the Earthwise Transfer Station in conjunction with Green Up Day on May 30, 2020 due to the Pandemic. A total of 11.55 tons of tires and a ton of metal were collected during this event. The Wheels for Warmth Program was cancelled last year due to Covid-19. We are planning to hold a spring tire and metal collection in conjunction with Green Up Day on May 1, 2021. Alliance residents can bring their mixed paper, glass bottles and jars, metal cans and plastics #1 through #7, except for plastic film wrap and bags and beaded styrofoam for single stream recycling to the Earthwise Transfer Station, Rodney’s Rubbish Transfer Station and Redemption Center. There are also local haulers and Saturday Fast Trash Collections available in the Mad River Resource Management Alliance. Currently the recyclables are taken to the Chittenden County Materials Recovery Facility for processing. Due to market conditions there is now a charge for collecting and processing recyclables. Computers, printers, monitors and televisions can be recycled at no charge at the Earthwise Transfer Station or the State Surplus Property Office on Route 2 in Waterbury. Other e-waste can be brought to the State Surplus Property facility in Waterbury and recycled at a small per pound fee. During 2020, 45.69 tons of e-waste was collected. Additional information on this program is found on our web site. The Alliance is a member of the Northeast Resource Recovery Association which helps us market some recyclable commodities such as tires, propane cylinders other materials and assists with educational programs. The Alliance is also a member of the Product Stewardship Institute(PSI). As a stakeholder in the PSI we work with other entities to reduce the environmental and health impacts of a variety of consumer products. This is accomplished by looking at the life cycle impacts of products and their packaging. Things like energy and materials consumption, emissions during manufacturing, toxicity, worker safety and waste disposal are among the issues reviewed. The objective of product stewardship is to rethink the way things are created in order to have more sustainable products in the future. We are also a member of the Vermont Product Stewardship Council which provides a local focus on legislative initiatives and other stewardship issues. Our Solid Waste Implementation Plan(SWIP) is updated every five years. The draft update is available for review at our website, madriverrma.org. Backyard burning of trash is illegal and causes air pollution problems. Be a good neighbor and don’t burn trash. If you know of any illegal dumping sites within your town that would benefit from an Adopt a Site Program give John Malter, Alliance Administrator a call at 244-7373 and let’s see what we can do to help eliminate these types of problems together. The FY21 assessment for the administration and programs remains at $7.00 per capita. The representatives of the Alliance include: Fayston, Chuck Martel; Moretown, Jonathan Siegel; Waitsfield, Sal Spinosa; Warren, Margo Wade; Waterbury, Alec Tuscany and John Malter from Waterbury is the Administrator for the Alliance.

50

SKATIUM Skatium is a Mad River Valley community outdoor skating facility located in Irasville. It is owned and operated by SKATIUM, INC., a local non-profit (501.c.3) corporation. The facility currently operates on natural ice with a Zamboni, dasher boards, and several ancillary structures situated on 5.4 acres owned by Skatium. Winter activities include public skating, stick time for hockey, and group rental time such as adult hockey and private parties. Income for its $30,000.00 annual operating winter budget comes primarily from operations, with some assistance from donations including grants from the Mad River Valley Recreation District. Labor is provided by two paid employees and volunteers. Due to Co-Vid, Skatium did not open for the 2020/2021 season, the first time in 27 years it has not operated for the winter season. However it is open for the 2021/2022 winter season and has plans to upgrade the rink surface in the spring to allow summer uses such as box lacrosse, soccer, basketball, markets, etc.. Skatium also has plans for a roof structure that would allow for all-season/all weather operation, for which it is seeking funding through donations, grants and in-kind contributions. SKATIUM BOARD OF DIRECTORS Zeke Church Mike Eramo Bill Moore Debbie Smith Don Swain

Upside Down - Photo by Patti Lewis

51

VSNIP The VT Spay Neuter Incentive Program aka “VSNIP”, under the oversight of the VT Economic Services Department, is administered by VT Volunteer Services for Animals Humane Society (VVSA). VSNIP helps financially challenged Vermont residents spay/ neuter cats and dogs for $27.00. The balance is paid by fellow Vermonters when dogs are licensed by an added $4.00 fee, the major funding for this important program. Funds are determined by the number of dogs licensed, which is required by law when a dog is six months of age. A current rabies vaccination is required to register, and a rabies vaccination can be administered after 12 weeks of age for both cats and dogs. Prostrate and mammary cancer is more likely to occur in unsterilized cats and dogs. It’s not pretty and they’re likely to die. Animals live longer and happier when they’re spayed and neutered, are less likely to fight for territory, and mark what they claim to be “theirs”! Licensing a dog: 1) helps identify your dog if lost, 2) provides proof your dog is protected from rabies in the event your dog is bitten by a rabid animal, but would still need immediate medical attention, 3) if your dog bites an animal or person – which could result in quarantine or possible euthanasia to test for infection, and 4) helps pay for VSNIP, addressing the population situation in Vermont. Farms with cats should especially be aware that one rabid cat or dog can affect an entire population of animals on the premise. The answer is neutering through VSNIP which includes a rabies vaccination and the first of the two part distemper series. Look for Rabies Clinics in March across the state. You can call your veterinarian and ask the cost of a rabies vaccination only, or call your nearest Tractor Supply Store for their Monthly Rabies Clinic schedule. Rabies IS in Vermont and it IS deadly. To receive a VSNIP Application, send a 9” S.A.S.E to: VSNIP, PO Box 104, Bridgewater, VT 05034. Indicate if it’s for a cat, dog or both. For more information, call 802-672-5302. Please visit our website: www.VVSAHS.org VVSA will be hosting Rabies Clinics in March. Call for dates and locations. The animals thank you in advance! Together We Truly Do Make A Difference!! Sue Skaskiw, VVSA Humane Society Executive Director/VSNIP Administrator

52

WAITSFIELD-FAYSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT Calls by Type 2021

Calls By Type

Waitsfield

Structure Fire

1

Chimney Fire

3

1

4

Vehicle Fire

1

1

2

Contained Fire

1

1

Appliance Smoking/ On Fire

1

1

Electrical Fire

1

1

Smoke/Fire Alarm Activation- No Fire

29

CO Alarm Activation- No CO

4

CO in Building Motor Vehicle Accident Down Power lines/ Tree on Lines Chemical Smell/ Propane Odor Smoke in Building Wildland Fire

Fayston

Moretown

Northfield

Total

1

1

3

39

4

2

1

10

3

3

1

3 2

15 4

2

2

3

3

1

2

3 2

HAZMAT

2

1

Service Call

1

Good Intent

5

Elevator Alarm- No Emergency

Total

Middlesex

10

Mutual Aid Standby

Medical Assist

Warren

1 69

1 1

3

8

3

3

``

`

24

4

1 2

1

1

101

53

WAITSFIELD-FAYSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT

Waits&ield Fayston Fire Department Annual Report – January 2022 The Waits*ield-Fayston Fire Department (WFFD) responded to 101 incidents in 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic continued to challenge our department throughout the year. The attached summary of calls highlights the incidents that were responded to throughout 2021. In all cases there was no loss of life and whenever possible the protection of property or mitigation of loss was achieved with a high degree of success. The WFFD has 20 active members led by Chief Johnson and seven of*icers. The WFFD enjoys a close relationship with those we serve as well as the select boards and town of*icials. This cooperation and respect allows for better planning and budget management. 2021 Accomplishments include: •

• •

54

Preparation for the replacement of our aging Rescue Van which is key to our response protocols (it carries all our *ire*ighter gear to the scene). Moving of the ‘repeater’ to a higher elevation to improve the radio de*iciencies we encounter in the Valley.

Exploring and applying to various grant opportunities available to the WFFD. Two of these grants have been approved and will allow the WFFD to purchase new equipment.

55

Brunswick Buels Gore



94.67 92.63

101.67 101.05 108.93 111.59 97.28 97.28 93.03 97.08 93.26 99.59 94.97 110.26 93.72 91.61 93.8 99.29 101.9 108.77 101.8 104.02 89.61 95.74 101.13 98.56 98.81 96.5 92.13 108.09 92.25 100.86 100.45 107.97

Alburgh Andover Arlington Athens Averill Averys Gore Bakersfield [email protected] Barnard Barnet Barre City Barre Town Barton Belvidere Bennington Benson Berkshire Berlin Bethel Bloomfield Bolton Bradford Braintree Brandon BraVleboro Bridgewater Bridport Brighton Bristol Brookfield Brookline Brownington



98.91 106.49

Common Level of Appraisal

Addison Albany

TOWN

2021 Reappraisal

1.6183 1.0796

1.4725 1.5009 1.4507 1.5750 1.0280 1.0280 1.4789 1.5623 1.7326 1.7041 1.4268 1.2289 1.3539 1.6600 1.4828 1.4481 1.3501 1.5772 1.5636 1.4728 1.6498 1.6648 1.5627 1.3862 1.7401 1.6744 1.7893 1.4984 1.7641 1.5669 1.8093 1.1676

1.6929 1.1734

1.7028 1.7403

1.5855 1.5952 1.4798 1.4446 1.6571 1.6571 1.7328 1.6605 1.7285 1.6186 1.6974 1.4620 1.7200 1.7596 1.7186 1.6235 1.5819 1.4820 1.5835 1.5497 1.7989 1.6837 1.5940 1.6356 1.6314 1.6705 1.7497 1.4913 1.7474 1.5983 1.6048 1.4930

1.6298 1.5138

6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 7/14/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/14/21 8/18/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/14/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21

Homestead Tax Nonhomestead Tax Rate Rate [email protected] Date

Randolph Reading

Moretown Morgan Morristown Mount Holly Mount Tabor New Haven Newark Newbury Newfane Newport City Newport Town North Bennington North Hero Northfield Norton Norwich Orange Orleans ID Orwell Panton Pawlet Peacham Peru PiVsfield PiVsford Plainfield Plymouth Pomfret Poultney Pownal Proctor Putney 100.95 107.69

92.94 98.26 94.39 106.43 102.82 91.42 100.9 100.38 96.42 96.55 106.04 93.59 92.9 91.96 90.4 90.28 96.36 93.56 98.7 97.24 105.84 103.62 100.91 109.15 94.69 91.16 96.97 107.5 97.5 103.78 99.87 96.74 1.5655 1.5004

1.7765 1.3054 1.5944 1.5378 1.5132 1.7801 1.4126 1.5879 1.8849 1.5787 1.5127 1.6453 1.7169 1.5669 1.6947 1.8625 1.4387 1.3426 1.4567 1.7219 1.3347 1.7239 1.5419 1.2005 1.4428 1.7599 1.6663 1.5031 1.4807 1.3478 1.4456 1.7730

1.5968 1.4969

1.7345 1.6405 1.7078 1.5146 1.5678 1.7633 1.5976 1.6059 1.6719 1.6696 1.5202 1.7224 1.7352 1.7529 1.7832 1.7856 1.6729 1.7230 1.6332 1.6578 1.5231 1.5557 1.5975 1.4769 1.7024 1.7683 1.6624 1.4995 1.6533 1.5533 1.6141 1.6663

6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/14/21

2021 Common Nonhome Reapprais Level of Homestea stead Tax [email protected] Date TOWN al Appraisal d Tax Rate Rate Montgomery 101.36 1.3573 1.5904 6/29/21 Montpelier 84.44 1.7744 1.9090 6/29/21

FY 22 EDUCATION TAX RATES

56

airlee ayston



91.51 92.63

86.29 98.22 102.41 94.51 133.87 97.44 112.17 106.16 99.43 103.02 101.58 106.46 90.25 92.62 94.18 93.09 99.36 97.31 89.05 110.98 85.93 87.55

Colchester Concord Corinth Cornwall Coventry Cra sbury Danby Danville Derby Dorset Dover Dummerston Duxbury ast Haven ast Montpelier den lmore nosburgh ssex Town air Haven airfax airfield



98.66 94.99 98.91 100.84 96.54 99.22

Charleston CharloVe Chelsea Chester ChiVenden Clarendon



97.25 93.93 91.65 108.02 93.74 100.25



93.7 105.32

Cabot Calais Cambridge Canaan Castleton Cavendish

Burke Burlington

2.1380 1.7825

1.5982 1.4511 1.4546 1.7443 1.0505 1.6864 1.3871 1.4612 1.3405 1.5103 1.6931 1.6151 1.8295 1.6541 1.8215 1.6336 1.5147 1.3782 1.6555 1.2955 1.5042 1.7027

1.4603 1.5409 1.6564 1.5041 1.5793 1.5665

1.7175 1.8264 1.5984 1.5416 1.5338 1.5129

1.5211 1.4553

1.7616 1.7403

1.8681 1.6412 1.5741 1.7056 1.2042 1.6544 1.4371 1.5185 1.6212 1.5647 1.5869 1.5142 1.7861 1.7404 1.7116 1.7317 1.6224 1.6566 1.8102 1.4525 1.8759 1.8412

1.6339 1.6970 1.6298 1.5986 1.6698 1.6247

1.6576 1.7162 1.7589 1.4923 1.7197 1.6080

1.7204 1.5306

6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/14/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/14/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

7/28/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 7/14/21 ✔

tra ord traVon

earsburg ha sbury ha sbury ID haron he eld helburne heldon horeham hrewsbury omerset outh Burlington✔ outh Hero pringfield t. Albans City t. Albans Town t. George t. ohnsbury tamford tannard tarksboro tockbridge towe

Rupert Rutland City Rutland Town Ryegate ✔ alisbury andgate

Richmond Ripton Rochester Rockingham Roxbury Royalton

Readsboro Richford

97.67 95.8

101.19 103.98 102.2 94.93 92.02 91.47 94.2 98.3 98.83 98.85 112.03 97.28 94.78 89.23 95.02 84.8 99.06 92.07 90.45 93.07 101.36 87.51

103.46 93.39 100.02 101.85 87.88 102.22

85.65 89.78 102.98 95.55 102.19 94.98

110 112.34

1.6638 1.4838

1.4176 1.3481 1.5067 1.6764 1.5489 1.6002 1.4605 1.6770 1.5727 1.0116 1.3249 1.6357 1.7004 1.6706 1.5688 1.7261 1.4048 1.4996 1.7988 1.7486 1.6140 1.7198

1.3654 1.6402 1.4751 1.4662 1.8759 1.3790

1.7261 1.8362 1.5886 1.9323 1.4662 1.6758

1.2725 1.1938

1.6505 1.6827

1.5930 1.5503 1.5773 1.6981 1.7518 1.7623 1.7113 1.6399 1.6311 1.6308 1.4389 1.6571 1.7008 1.8066 1.6965 1.9009 1.6273 1.7508 1.7822 1.7320 1.5904 1.8421

1.5581 1.7261 1.6117 1.5827 1.8343 1.5770

1.8821 1.7955 1.5654 1.6871 1.5775 1.6972

1.4655 1.4349

6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/21/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21

57

Landgrove Leicester

Guildhall Guilford Halifax Hancock Hardwick Har ord Hartland Highgate Hinesburg Holland Hubbardton [email protected] Hyde Park Ira Irasburg Isle La MoVe amaica ay ericho ohnson illington irby

Gra on Granby Grand Isle Granville Greensboro Groton





98.41 98.74

103.8 97.34 105.17 105.25 94.15 93.33 100.6 97.41 93.9 89.09 95.47 89.88 92.65 96.09 99.36 97.11 96.69 103.27 93.09 99.25 89.24 101.17

103.73 99.8 95.41 95.92 95.66 101.17

86.34 96.1 89.8 95.11 109.43 93.38

letcher ranklin Georgia Glastenbury Glover Goshen



97.28 98.22

erdinand errisburgh

1.5810 1.3836

1.1710 1.7664 1.4387 1.6256 1.7782 1.6324 1.7367 1.3848 1.5588 1.5473 1.5060 1.6449 1.6413 1.4968 1.2704 1.6425 1.8796 1.5249 1.5881 1.5322 1.8106 1.5143

1.6942 1.2179 1.6717 1.7837 1.7521 1.4760

1.7366 1.4036 1.5719 1.0514 1.1674 1.4631

1.0280 1.7047

1.6380 1.6326

1.5530 1.6561 1.5328 1.5316 1.7122 1.7272 1.6024 1.6549 1.7167 1.8094 1.6885 1.7935 1.7399 1.6776 1.6224 1.6600 1.6672 1.5610 1.7317 1.6242 1.8064 1.5934

1.5540 1.6152 1.6896 1.6806 1.6851 1.5934

1.8670 1.6774 1.7951 1.6949 1.4731 1.7263

1.6571 1.6412

6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 7/14/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/1/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21

Westminster Westmore

ictory Waitsfield Walden Wallingford Waltham Wardsboro Warners Grant Warren Warren Gore Washington Waterbury Waterford ✔ Waterville Weathersfield Wells Wells River West airlee West Haven West Rutland West Windsor Wes ield Wes ord

Troy Tunbridge nderhill ergennes ernon ershire

uVon wanton The ord Tinmouth Topsham Townshend

udbury underland

95.75 106.66

101.12 96.09 96.72 99.42 97.03 95.08 97.28 92.4 97.28 97.85 91.8 104.94 91.97 93.11 94.87 101.72 101.71 96.57 105.64 95.79 102.32 89.8

97.33 103.22 89.37 91.9 105.62 91.33

108.33 98.39 92.18 98.25 100.72 99.79

109.4 98.8

1.8361 1.1572

1.7621 1.7183 1.6628 1.5634 1.7257 1.8089 1.0280 1.7869 1.0280 1.4168 1.7986 1.6172 1.6535 1.9482 1.6253 1.4680 1.9236 1.4889 1.3666 1.4576 1.3708 1.6416

1.4641 1.5872 1.6542 1.8220 1.4753 2.1422

1.3211 1.3710 1.8848 1.5820 1.4791 1.8615

1.2488 1.2303

1.6836 1.5113

1.5941 1.6776 1.6667 1.6214 1.6613 1.6954 1.6571 1.7446 1.6571 1.6474 1.7560 1.5361 1.7527 1.7313 1.6992 1.5847 1.5849 1.6693 1.5259 1.6828 1.5754 1.7951

1.6562 1.5617 1.8037 1.7541 1.5262 1.7650

1.4880 1.6384 1.7488 1.6407 1.6005 1.6154

1.4735 1.6316

6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/14/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/14/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21

58

✔ 95.89 98.75 91.57 93.09

94.99 100.22 105.95 87.95 131.69 100 1.7890 1.5822 1.5520 1.7482

1.2796 1.5525 1.6389 1.8241 1.1578 1.6485

1.5266 1.5981 1.5735 1.6207 1.4225 1.4753

1.4639 1.0280

1.6811 1.6324 1.7604 1.7317

1.6970 1.6085 1.5215 1.8329 1.2241 1.6120

1.5122 1.6557 1.7116 1.5962 1.6088 1.6686

1.5500 1.6571

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/14/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 7/21/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21

Woodford Woodstock Worcester

Windham Windsor Winhall Winooski WolcoV Woodbury

Wheelock [email protected] [email protected] Williamstown Williston Wilmington

Weston Weybridge

100.93 90.39 99.55

97.83 98.67 98.24 79.57 94.21 98.33

98.85 105.29 100.64 101.37 92.03 100.31

96.86 96.62

1.3760 1.7876 1.7233

1.6402 1.4150 1.7793 1.9024 1.6757 1.7022

1.4419 1.2976 1.6852 1.4214 1.5905 1.6908

1.6063 1.7062

Rate are per 100 of assessed value A Indicates pending results of reappraisal B Indicates [email protected] spending data is missing. In accordance with 32 . .A. 5402 interim rates may be available from the Tax Department upon re uest

Middlesex Middletown prings Milton Monkton

Maidstone Manchester Marlboro Marshfield Mendon Middlebury

106.6 97.36 94.18 100.99 100.2 96.61

Lincoln Londonderry Lowell Ludlow Lunenburg Lyndon



104 97.28

Lemington Lewis

1.5971 1.7834 1.6193

1.6478 1.6337 1.6409 2.0259 1.7111 1.6394

1.6308 1.5310 1.6017 1.5902 1.7516 1.6070

1.6643 1.6684

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21 6/29/21

6/29/21 6/29/21

EQUALIZATION STUDY RESULTS FOR FAYSTON

State ofVermont Department of Taxes

133 State Street Montpelier, Vt 05633-1401

Agency ofAdministration Phone: Fax:

(802) 828-5860 (802) 828-2239

December 23, 2021 Town Clerk Town o f Fayston 866 Ndrth Fayston Road North Fayston, VT 05660 2021 Equalization Study Results This letter serves as notification o f tlie results o f Property Valuation and Review (PVR)'s 2021 equalization study. Every year we are required to certify the equalized education property value (EEPV or EEGL) and coefficient o f dispersion (COD) for each Vermont town (32 V.S.A § 5406). This letter also communicates the Common Level o f Appraisal (CLA) for your town and explains how it will impact your homestead and nonhomestead education tax rates. Education Grand List (from 411): Equalized Education Grand List (EEGL): CommoJ;J. Level of Appraisal (CLA): Coefficient o f Dispersion (COD):

$379,572,900 $422,973,475

89.74 % or 0.8974 13.89%

For a copy o f your town final computation sheet and certified sales report, please see: tax.vermont.gov/municipal-officials The education grand list listed here is what was reported by your town to the state on the 411 form with your town's cable (if applicable) and tax increment financing (TIP) amounts (if any) included. This number represents the town's total property value that is subject to the education property tax (from the most recent grand list available) and serves as the numerator in the computation o f the CLA. Please note: tax revenue from any TIF property value is subject to allocation (32 V.S.A. § 5404a). The equalized education grand list (EEGL) represents PVR's statutorily-mandated estimate o f total fair market value o f the education grand list in your town and serves as the denominator in the computation o f the CLA. To find out more about how the equalization study is conducted, how to read the certified sales report, and additional instructions on how to appeal your results, please see the "Introduction to Vermont's Equalization Study" document at: tax.vermont.gov/municipal-officials The common level of appraisal (CLA) is determined by dividing the education grand list by the equalized education grand list (32 V.S.A. § 5401). A number over 100% indicates that property in your town is generally listed for more than its fair market value. A number less than 100% indicates that property is generally listed for less than its fair market value. A CLA below 85% or over 115% necessitates a reappraisal (32 V.S.A § 4041a). The homestead and nonhomestead tax rates in your town will be adjusted by your town's CLA (32 V.S.A § 5402). 59

Y.ERMONT

EQUALIZATION STUDY RESULTS FOR FAYSTON

The nonhomestead rate in your town will be the statewide nonhomestead rate divided by your CLA. The homestead rate will be the town homestead rate (which is determined by the per-pupil spending of any school district( s) to which your town belongs) divided by the CLA. A CLA greater than 100% will result in a downward adjustment of tax rates, and a CLA less than 100% will result in upward adjustment. To get answers to many common questions about tax rates and how they are determined and to see how the current year property tax rates for your town were calculated, please see the department's education tax resources at: tax.vermont.gov/education-tax-rates The coefficient of dispersion (C ) is a measure of how fairly distributed the property tax is within your town. It is calculated as the average of the (absolute) difference of each sales ratio (list price divided by sales price) in the study from the median ratio. That result is then divided by the median ratio to get the COD, which is expressed as a percent (32 V.S.A. § 5401). A high COD means that within your town many taxpayers are paying more than their fair share and many are paying less than their fair share. A COD over 20% necessitates a reappraisal (32 V.S.A. § 4041a). Appeals: A muriicipality may petition the director of Property Valuation and Review for a redetermination of its EEPV and or COD (32 V.S.A § 5408). All petitions must be in writing and signed by the chair of the municipality's legislative body. Petitions should contain a plain statement of matters being appealed and a statement of the remedy being sought. etitions must e received y R y t e close of usiness on t e t day after mailing of t is letter. Additional instructions on appeals can be found in the "Introduction to Vermont's Equalization Study" document at: tax.vermont.gov/municipal-officials

e at PVR are aware that many towns are concerned about the change in the market due to the affects of Covid-19 over the past year. Sales have increased generally in price and some 'towns have seen this more than others. This is a typical real estate market reaction which is seen when conditions in the world change such as economy, politics etc. As a result there are more towns experiencing large drops in their CLA. This is to be expected in a market shift. As you may have seen recently on the news, education base rates are expected to decrease which will minimize the effect of changing CLA's on the tax rates in towns with large shifts. There will also be many more reappraisal orders going out to towns than in a typical year as a result. If you have concerns about your results you should talk with your District Advisor about what the best plan of action mi2:ht be for vour town. If you have any questions, please contact yourdistrict advisor or call 802-828-5860. Sincerely, I

1-11

L/jl}Ul . :

60

I I'

"'J

ill Remick, Director Property Valuation and Review

Chair, oard of Listers Chair, School oard Chair, Select oard Superintendent of Schools

PRELIMINARY CASH FLOW

61

62

63

HUUSD FY2022 BUDGET AVAILABILITY The HUUSD Annual Report, which includes the proposed 2022-2023 school budget, will be available February 11, 2022. The report will be available online at HUUSD.org. You may also request a copy by calling 802-583-7953. We can mail the copy or you may arrange pickup at the HUUSD Central Office. The board will hold an annual meePng and informaPonal budget meePng at Harwood Union High School and via Zoom on February 28, 2022 at 6PM. See the HUUSD website for instrucPons on joining the meePng.

Boy e 64

i - Photo by i a oit

h

TOWN CLERK TOWN OF FAYSTON 866 NORTH FAYSTON ROAD NORTH FAYSTON, VERMONT 05660

PRESORT STANDARD U.S. POSTAGE

PAID PERMIT #22 MORETOWN, VT 05660