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LOGBOOK 2020-21 fall semester personalized learning experience

fundamentals of Graphic Design introduction to Imagemaking ideas from the history OF Graphic Design ... ... ... ... ... ...

fundamentals of Graphic Design

digital works index

w1:denotation

w4:single contrast

it’s what we’d been seeing.

notes&individiul notes Graphic design isn't always about perfection. In this course, we are going to make images that are both literal and metaphorical. that are denotative and conatative. And when designers do this, the apple is no longer just an apple, it can represent or suggest a different idea. connatative images! The image represents the thing itself. is it? denotative images. the essence of the object? And when we start to use color with the idea of volume, you really get a sense of what the object feels like in an expressive way. color within the volume' Instead, it uses texture and weight. The quality of the line can be seen in the tool that makes the mark but also in the gesture that you're making. You could also think about your images having no line quality at all, and just working with volume. But if you're making images by hand, and with objects, and paint, and raw materials onto different surfaces, quite often that texture can be much, much more important. Part of what I think is valuable about this kind of visual experimentation, is that you really push the boundaries of denotation and understand where they lie. pushed boundaries of denotation' What this means is how close up to or how far away you are from your image, and this determines exactly what you're gonna see of the image. cropping' the experiment.. And what iteration means, it's just that you make a lot of variations of the same thing. process' experiment on the way... We're telling stories, creating narratives, and giving extra information to the viewer. The dictionary defines connotation as an idea or feeling that a word invokes in addition to its literal meaning. process' experiment on the way... It's when we start to want to suggest something else, or build a metaphor or an idea. connatation' Now, we've already looked at denotation, and we described that as being it is what it is. And obviously the ends of the letters can also be a place where serifs might exist. spur’

And this can be space that is entirely trapped or space that is partially trapped.

counterspace’ And this area can be truncated, cut perpendicular or diagonally or have a rounder, more bowl shape. terminal' And then the other part of the letter form, the other stroke, is called the bowl, where it's round and curved. bowl' And you can see the vertical stroke is called the stem, and this holds a lot of the weight and the stress of the letter form. stem' The space between words is called a word space and if you alter both the letter spacing and the word spacing then that's called tracking. tracking' The space between words is called a word space and if you alter both the letter spacing and the word spacing then that's called tracking. The system for measuring type that we use is based on times when type was actually set on metal and that metal was used on a printing press to print letter forms. not time, no measurement but body that is point size! 72 points per inch... there are harmonious. The system for measuring type that we use is based on times when type was actually set on metal and that metal was used on a printing press to print letter forms. The two most commonly used settings for text are either justified or range left. justifade / text , range text / Typographic connotation relies on the fact that we read words, but we also read form. So the simplest visual contrast might just be the shape itself. simplest visual constrast as a complex and simple in a minimal way... scale... feels in space...widerness... depthness... static/moving... tonality... volume or volume...

What this demonstrates is that even with a very, very simple forms and very rudimentary tools, the designer has an incredible control over the meaning of something, over the meaning of an image or mark. that's right.

Both icons and the symbols represent other things. In this video, we're gonna take a quick look at what happens when we take our shapes and we put them into an environment.

figure ground... object background"" positive and negative spaces. Hue is probably the most powerful and the most visible attribute of color. hue. value. saturation! Another thing that I like to do with color wheels is to just set them up so that they work as a series of tints with the same color. color tints. So what we've done here is taken a segment of each piece of the color wheel and paired it up with its exact opposite. complementary colors. And these are basically colors that if they were in the true spectrum they'd be gradations from one pure color to another color. analogous colors. And they're used when you need a very specific color that you maybe can't mix out of the CMYK color set. spot color. Printed color, also known as four color process, works in a slightly different way than the two other systems that we've looked at, RGB and painted color. cmyk. for print! If we now look at painted color, or pigment, one of the first things that you'll notice is the difference between painted color and RGB onscreen color, is that one of our primary colors is different. green to yellow. for paint! What this means is you're basically starting out from black, and you're adding light to colors. additive color. Pattern really relies on two things in order to work. rhythm and repetition! It's about doing it with some kind of thoughtful intent as the designer and using composition as a tool really to help you to create messages as well as aesthetics. (about composition) with thoughtful intent! So we're going to divide visual contrast up into a list of six different categories. Those categories are form or kind of shape, scale, form, scale, weight, space, direction and texture are for contrast! You want to control how a viewer reads or understands that image, and a big part of that is actually how the image is cropped. cropping! They would be in our foreground. the important thing in an image is where it starts? So one thing we haven't really talked about in this Fundamentals of Graphic Design class, but that we can bring up a little bit now, is just the relationship between aesthetics and content. aesthetics and content in context.

FIN

the end

introduction to Image Making

digital works w1:mood board “mood of a deer”

w2:Range of Representation a deer

w3:Composing Simple Spreads

w4:Composing a Complex Narrative (in a book)

notes&individiul notes

Ideas From The History OF Graphic Design

notes&individiul notes

notes&individiul notes

certificates

COURSE CERTIFICATE

2 5 . K a s . 2 02 0

Ma hmut Kema l GÖKSAL IO

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Fu ndamentals of Graphic D esign

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Coursera üzerinden sunulan ve California Institute of the Arts tarafından yetkilendirilmiş çevrimiçi, kredisiz ders

Michael Worthington Faculty, Program in Graphic Design School of Art

B u l i nkt e doğ u l a yı n, coursera .org /veri f y/JU A 96FKQLLD 2

 

Cour se r a , bu bir e yin kim liğ ini ve de r se ka t ılım ını doğ r ula dı.

COURSE CERTIFICATE

D ec 2 , 2 02 0

Ma hmut Kema l GÖKSAL IO

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Introdu ction to Imagemaking

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has successfully completed

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an online non-credit course authorized by California Institute of the Arts and offered through Coursera

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Gail Swanlund Faculty in Graphic Design School of Art

 

Veri f y a t coursera .org /veri f y/ZS 4H M H 5W L64G Cour se r a ha s conf ir m e d t he ide nt it y of this individua l a nd t he ir pa r ticipa t ion in t he cour se .

COURSE CERTIFICATE

No v 3 0, 2 02 0

Ma hmut Kema l GÖKSAL

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Ideas from the History of Graphic Design

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an online non-credit course authorized by California Institute of the Arts and offered through Coursera

Louise Sandhaus Faculty, Program in Graphic Design School of Art

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has successfully completed

F C E R T I

Lorraine Wild Faculty, Program in Graphic Design School of Art

 

Veri f y a t coursera .org /veri f y/ZA 568KN6ZE Z4 Cour se r a ha s conf ir m e d the ide ntit y of this individua l a nd the ir pa r t icipa tion in the cour se .

published, 2020