Data Loading...

OBOT_One Book One Teacher (Banaran Publishing) Flipbook PDF

OBOT_One Book One Teacher (Banaran Publishing)


139 Views
23 Downloads
FLIP PDF 4.8MB

DOWNLOAD FLIP

REPORT DMCA

OBOT

One Book One Teacher

Rudi Hartono Bambang Purwanto Seful Bahri

OBOT

One Book One Teacher OBOT is a program of writing course books or other books for teachers who have teaching materials or important ideas to be written in the form of printed and electronic books as a resource or reference for teaching and learning activities or reading materials for students in or out of the classroom. The OBOT program covers: • Introducing the procedure of writing a course book; • Preparing teaching materials in accordance with the lesson plan, syllabus, and current curriculum; • Writing initial drafts; • Checking the initial drafts according to the contents and rules of course book writing; • Editing and revising the initial drafts to the final drafts; • Preparing book covers and other additional page formats; • Submitting manuscripts to publishers; • Publishing manuscripts or doing selfpublishing.

OBOT One Book One Teacher

ii

OBOT One Book One Teacher

Rudi Hartono Bambang Purwanto Seful Bahri

iii

OBOT (One Book One Teacher) Copyright © 2019 by Rudi Hartono, et al. All rights reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review. Editor: Rudi Hartono Cover designer: Rudi Hartono

Printed in Semarang, Indonesia First Printing, 2019 ISBN 978-623-7618-19-5

Publisher LPPM UNNES Press Gedung Prof. Retno Sriningsih Satmoko Lantai 2 Kampus Sekaran Gunungpati Semarang Kode Pos: 50229 Telp: (024) 8508089 Fax: (024)8508089 Email: [email protected] Member of the Association of Indonesian Publisher (IKAPI)

iv

Acknowledgment Alhamdulillah, thank Allah for His Blessing in helping me compile this book of “OBOT: One Book One Teacher”. Sholawat and Salam, be up to him, the Prophet Muhammad SAW, the leader of Islam leading the man from the darkness to the lightness. In relation to this book, I thank everybody who contributes materials, particularly those who provided very valuable materials as the main source of this book, the bloggers, web owners, illustration makers, providers, and whoever attached photos or pictures in websites in general. May God the Almighty give you the rewards. I hope this book will be useful for those who want to learn how to write a course book, especially lecturers and teachers who are concerning with and practicing how to write a course book well. Thanks for your attentions and have a practice of course book writing in the program of One Book One Teacher (OBOT).

v

vi

Preface Writing a course book is very challenging because it is not only studying how to write a course book but also practicing of writing a real book. This book is your choice to lead you to be a professional course book writer. It is a very significant reference for all lecturers and teachers who want to be skilful in writing a course book. This book contains several units focusing on how to write a course book. It guides you to write a course book from drafting to publishing. The units provide the introduction to follow the One Book One Teacher (OBOT) program, prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing the book. Referring to the previous references of course book writing, this book is more complete than the books are available and published by several publishers. This book provides clear and actual theories and examples. Besides using this book, you can use other materials of course book writing from other resources, such as printed and online resources, websites, and other compilation of course book writing guides. Through this book, lecturers and teachers can practice their course book writing activities well and professionally. Hopefully you can use this book as the main reference. Thanks for your attention and have a nice practice of course book writing. Semarang, 28th October 2019

Rudi Hartono, et al. The writers

vii

viii

Contents Acknowledgment Preface Contents List of Figures Chapter 1 One Book One Teacher Program (OBOT) Chapter 2 The Planning Stage of Writing Chapter 3 The Anatomy of a Book Chapter 4 Criteria of a Book Chapter 5 Course book, Textbook, and Handout Chapter 6 Book Cover Chapter 7 The Front Matter Chapter 8 The Text Matter Chapter 9 The Back Matter Chapter 10 Textbook Evaluation References Glossary Index The Authors’ Bio

ix

v vii ix xi 1 7 11 27 35 39 55 71 85 91 97 103 121 129

x

List of Figures Figure 1.1 Figure 2.1 Figure 3.1 Figure 3.2 Figure 6.1 Figure 6.2 Figure 6.3 Figure 6.4 Figure 6.5 Figure 6.6 Figure 6.7 Figure 6.8 Figure 6.9 Figure 6.10 Figure 6.11 Figure 6.12 Figure 6.13 Figure 6.14 Figure 6.15 Figure 7.1 Figure 7.2 Figure 7.3 Figure 7.4 Figure 7.5 Figure 7.6 Figure 7.7 Figure 7.8 Figure 7.9 Figure 7.10 Figure 7.11 Figure 7.12 Figure 7.13

The process of course book writing The planning stage of writing Part of a book Definition of parts of a book The anatomy of a book cover The example of a book cover The example of a front cover (1) The example of a front cover (2) The example of a front cover (3) The example of a front cover (4) The example of a back cover (1) The example of a back cover (2) The example of a back cover (3) The example of a back cover (4) The example of a spine The examples of spines The example of an endorsement The example of a dust jacket The examples of dust jackets The structure of a title page The example of a title page (1) The example of a title page (2) The example of a blank page The structure of a copyright notice The example of a copyright notice The example of a preface (1) The example of a preface (2) The example of a foreword (1) The example of a foreword (2) The example of an acknowledgment (1) The example of an acknowledgment (2) The example of a table of contents (1)

xi

4 8 19 20 41 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 53 54 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

Figure 7.14 Figure 7.15 Figure 8.1 Figure 8.2 Figure 8.3 Figure 8.4 Figure 8.5 Figure 8.6 Figure 8.7 Figure 8.8 Figure 8.9 Figure 8.10 Figure 8.11 Figure 8.12 Figure 8.13 Figure 8.14 Figure 8.15 Figure 8.16 Figure 9.1 Figure 9.2 Figure 9.3 Figure 9.4 Figure 9.5 Figure 9.6 Figure 10.1 Figure 10.2 Figure 10.3

The example of a table of contents (2) The example of a table of contents (3) The example of a book introduction (1) The example of a book introduction (1) The example of chapter title (1) The example of chapter title (2) The example of paragraph(s) The example of a footnote The example of an amplification The example of an apposition The example of an illustration The example of a table The example of running head (1) The examples of running heads (2) The example of initials The example of a side-note The example of a footnote (1) The example of a footnote (2) The example of a closing note The example of a glossary The example of an appendix The example of an index The example of a reference list The example of a writer biography The example of a Textbook Evaluation Checklist (1) The example of a Textbook Evaluation Checklist (2) Page 1 The example of a Textbook Evaluation Checklist (2) Page 2

xii

69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 76 76 78 79 80 80 81 82 83 83 85 86 87 88 89 90 94 95 96

Chapter

1

One Book One Teacher Program (OBOT) 1

Writing competence is one of significant and basic demands for teachers in delivering their profession as educators. Many teachers feel that writing a book is a pride but it is too difficult for them to do. Many factors influence them not to start to write, such as inner motivation, institution supports, ideas, materials, and opportunities. For examples, many of them are lack of motivation to be confident course book writers, their institutions do not support their efforts and facilitate them well, they have no idea what they are going to write, they are not accustomed to provide their own lesson materials for their daily instruction—only copying from books or other resources, and most of them do not have any opportunity at all to write a course book. Therefore to create teacher-writers and produce course books in one school, One Book One Teacher (OBOT) program comes as a solution. OBOT is a program designed for teachers to be a course book writer at schools. Recently we revealed that OBOT has 1

Some parts of this unit are taken from the article entiled ―One Book One Teacher Program for Upgrading Teachers‘ Writing Competence (A Descriptive Survey) published in Language Circle Journal 14 (1) October 2019, pp. 63-68.

1

potential activities as an integrated program in preparing teachers to be professional course book writers. The problems found in the school cover many teachers are lack of motivation to be confident coursebook writers, schools do not support their efforts and facilitate them well, they have no idea what they are going to write, they are not accustomed to provide their own lesson materials for their daily instruction—only copying from books or other resources, they do not have any opportunity at all to write a course book. To overcome those problems we offer the program which leads teachers active and productive to write course books. One Book One Teacher (OBOT) program comes as a solution. In other popular term we have the term SAGUSABU (Satu Guru Satu Buku) (Maslani, 2017; Rahayu, 2017; Ihsan, 2018; Kompasiana, 2018). It is a program designed for teachers to be course book writers. This program has potential activities as an integrated program in preparing teachers to be professional course book writers. This program can motivate and increase teachers‘ creativity in developing their lesson materials into a course book (Oebaidillah, 2017). In this research operationally we define OBOT as a program of writing coursebooks or other books for teachers who have teaching materials or important ideas to be written in printed and

2

electronic books as a source or reference for teaching and learning activities in the classroom or reading materials for students and the general public (Hartono, 2019b). The followings are the steps of OBOT program (Hartono, 2019b): 1) Introducing the procedure of writing a course book; 2) Preparing teaching materials in accordance with the lesson plan, syllabus, and current curriculum; 3) Writing initial drafts; 4) Checking the initial drafts according to the contents and rules of course book writing; 5) Editing and revising the initial drafts to the final drafts; 6) Preparing book covers and other additional page formats; 7) Submitting manuscripts to publishers; 8) Publishing manuscripts or doing self-publishing. To have a good and standardized course, a writer should follow the process of course book writing. There are five steps of course book writing process. See the figure 1. There are five stages of the course book writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing (Trimansyah, 2018a, pp. 24-26; 2019b, p. 15).

3

Figure 1.1 The process of course book writing

In the prewriting stage we can do the following activities: 1) doing a literature review, 2) conducting a comparative literature study, 3) interviewing experts, 4) listing information, 5) using research results, and 6) using experience (Trimansyah, 2019d, pp. 5-6). In the drafting stage we can put ideas down to paper (Trimansyah, (2019b, p. 32). That is the command line to describe drafting. Draft or blurry is a one-time made writing. When writing a draft, you are advised to write down whatever you think about—of course related to the chapter or subsection you compiled—and do not do the editing when writing. Meanwhile, Trimansyah (2019a; 2019c) proposed things that we need to be considered in editing. They are four main aspects that need our concern in editing process. 1) Typographical error; 2) Linguistics: sentence order, and paragraphs; 3) Accuracy of data and facts; 4) Legality (related to plagiarism) and propriety.

4

In relation to the teachers‘ task in this program, we prepare a course book anatomy for them to do. The course book anatomy consists of four main parts: cover, preliminaries, text mater, and postliminaries (Putra, 2007; Setiati, 2012; Nurdiansyah, 2016).

5

6

Chapter

2

The Planning Stage of Writing 2

Trimansyah (2019a) proposes five steps of writing process that cover prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing (p. 11). The process of writing can be seen in the figure 1. Prewriting is the first step. In this step we can identify audience, define purpose, think, discuss, gather ideas, read or annotate, do free writing, and make outlining. The second step is drafting. In this step we can put our ideas down to our book draft (Trimansyah, (2019b, p. 32). In the drafting step, we do some activities. We sequence ideas and organize, rethink, support concise word choices and audience or purpose. In this step we revise our work and conduct a peer review. The next step is editing. In this step we edit grammar, punctuation, spelling, formats, in-text citation, and check references or bibliography. Editing step has a very important and significant position, so many experts of writing suggested to focus on it because it will determine much the final product of writing. Watson (2019) says: “Don’t doubt yourself! Write what’s on your heart. Write 2

Some parts of this unit are taken from the article published in the Proceeding of the 1st International Conference on Language, Literature, and Arts Education, UNY 2019.

7

what has to be written. Write the things that you will lay in bed at night thinking about if you don’t get them out on the page. Don’t worry about how it will be received yet; that part comes during for the editing process”. Meanwhile, Trimansyah (2019a; 2019c) also proposes four aspects that we should consider in the editing process. They are four main aspects are: 1) typographical error; 2) linguistics (sentence order, and paragraphs); 3) accuracy of data and facts; 4) and legality (related to plagiarism) and propriety. The final step is publishing. This step introduces our work to a public or users or consumers. Writers can publish their works in the classroom, online shop, or publishers.

Source: http://www.bcsc.k12.in.us/cms/lib/IN01000842/Centricity/Domain/1072/Writin g-Process_05-219rszm.jpg)

Figure 2.1 The planning stage of writing

In order to have a good coursebook, Collins (2019) gives some complete tips. What he proposed

8

is an appropriate guide for writers. The tips cover: 1) you should commit to write your book, 2) you must know what you are writing, 3) you see the audience or next consumers of your book, 4) you should have new ideas for your book, 5) you must establish what your book is about, 6) you have to decide what type of writer you are, 7) you must prepare a budget to publish your book yourself, 8) you should do a research your book, 9) you should break writing into small chunks, 10) you must do interviewing some experts to support and strength your book, 11) you start to write your book, 12) you outline your book, 13) you establish your book‘s controlling idea, 14) you set a deadline, 15) you should have a dedicated writing space, 16) you write your first draft, 17) you must be aware of your mistakes and errors, 18) you must manage your time to write your book, 19) you must fight your blocks and obstacles, 20) you should track your progress before editing your book and let it sit, 21) you should start to write the next draft, 22) you take a break from book writing, 23) If it is possible, you can hire an editor and proofreader, 24) you should format your book, 25) you should get ready to publish your book, 26) you write an fascinating title, 27) you must get a good book cover by designing it yourself or asking a book cover designer though you have to pay much, 28) you should build a team to launch your book, 29) you can market your book yourself or via book shops or

9

online shops, and 30) you have to know when you‘re at the end. In relation to the writing process of course book, writers should know the anatomy of book. It consists of four main parts: 1) cover, 2) preliminaries (front matter), body (text mater), and postliminaries (back matter) (Putra, 2007; Setiati, 2012; Nurdiansyah, 2016). Beside that Rappahannock (2014) proposed a more complete anatomy of textbooks that can be applied or used in the course book writing process. The book anatomy covers follows: 1) Preface or Introduction; 2) Foreword; 3) Author profile; 4) Table of contents; 5) Chapter Preview or Learning Objectives; 6) Introduction; 7) Applied Practice; 8) Chapter Summary; 9) Review Material, and; 10) Endnotes and Bibliographies.

10

Chapter

3

The Anatomy of a Book 3

Suwarno (2011) in Imran (2014) argues that books are works written or printed and published whose contents present various writings for various human needs in daily life. The book contains a presentation of information and knowledge, stories, to a collection of terms. In everyday life, books are very useful for adding insight, entertainment, and for learning needs. All types of uses are tailored to their goals and needs. By writing books, writers can convey messages and information to readers or everybody who need them for their daily needs. Writing books as a source of income not only for writers but also for sellers or book traders, publishers, printing agencies, or book deliveries. Books have many benefits for humans. The book provides a variety of information and knowledge that can be used by humans in their daily activities. Many people get instructions on how to do something from the book, 3

Adapted from Imran, S. (2014, December 05). Struktur dan Bagian-bagian penyusun Buku secara Umum. [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://ilmupendidikan.net/pustaka/buku/bagian-penyusun-buku and Casofa, F. (2019) Berkenalan dengan Anatomi Buku [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://fachmycasofa.com/anatomi-buku/ on October 30, 2019.

11

such as manual instructions, manuals, and recipes for how to cook, a prayer and ablution guide book on the procedures for prayer and ablution. Through books, too many people know about new knowledge resulting from the transfer of science and technology. Therefore it has become a byword many people who say that books are a storehouse of knowledge. If we want to make a good book, then we must follow how to make a book that is in accordance with the structure and anatomy of a book. A book must be arranged in a structured and neat, starting from the beginning, the contents, to the end, starting from the front cover to the back cover. The contents are in accordance with the message and information to be conveyed which are divided into chapters or units. In relation to making a book based on a a complete structure, Suwarno (2011) mentions the general anatomy of a book (p. 77). The structure or parts of the book in general are as follows: 1) Cover The book cover is the outermost part of the book that is useful to present the title page of the publication, the name of the author, the publisher accompanied by a graphic image to support the attractiveness. An interesting cover with a beautiful image can attract readers to buy. A good book cover

12

reflects the contents of the book to be delivered. If you are going to make a good book cover, you should pay attention to the following parts of the cover. a. The front cover. This is part of the front cover as the first face of the book that we display. For books printed in Latin writing, the front cover of the book is in the left position of the book, whereas if a book is written in Arabic, then the front cover of the book is in the right position. So the front cover of a Latin book is similar to the back cover of an Arabic book, and vice versa. b. Back cover. This part of cover is located at the end or the back of the book. Like the position of the front cover, the Latin books have the back cover in the right position while the Arabic books‘ back cover is in the left position. c. Spine. This part of the book is also called the backbone of the book. Spine is usually made for books that have many pages, so the book is thick. If it only a few pages, usually the book does not have a spine because it is too thin. The publisher will print the publisher's logo, book title, author's name, and even the year of publication on the spine. d. Endorsement. This is an expression of opinion or support from the figures and experts about the book. Endorsement is usually on the back cover of the book. This is a justification or

13

reinforcement from the reader about the contents of the book. This endorsement is similar to the testimonials given by readers after reading the book, so it convinces other readers to read or own the book. e. Dust jacket. This is the part of the book that became the jacket of the book. The shape is separate or separated from the book and in the form of a long sheet that covers the front cover and back cover of the book. It looks like a book blanket. Parts of this book are usually made beautiful and contain aesthetic value that is not just a book cover. Usually this book jacket is printed with colored foil and a good type of paper. 2) The Front Matter (Preliminary Page) The front matter is the preliminary page as the introduction page of the book. This section is at the beginning of the book before the contents or information of the book is presented. The front matter consists of: a. Title page. It contains title, sub-title, author's name or translator's name, and the publisher. b. A blank page. It is usually behind a French page that does not contain any information. Some publishers use this page to display copyright page.

14

c. Copyright notice. This page contains the title of the book, the name of the author/author/translator, the copyright owner to the publication team such as the cover designers and illustrators. d. Additional pages. This page usually consists of preface or introduction from the author or foreword and even acknowledgment. e. Table of contents. It sets out the sections and subsections of the report and their corresponding page numbers. It shows the structural relationship between the sections and subsections. 3) The Text Matter or Body (Main Section or Contents) The content section is the main part or called the text matter is the part of the book that contains and discusses the information or core material of the book. The text mater usually consists of: a. Introduction. The introduction is the initial part of the book that presents or introduces the main problems discussed in the book. Through the introduction, the reader will recognize the main or general information of the book to be discussed. In this section the reader will know the background of the problem, the reasons and

15

b.

c.

d.

e.

objectives of the discussion, some important information, alternative solutions, and suggestions that will be conveyed. Chapter Title. It is a part of a book that usually consists of several chapters where each chapter discusses a specific general topic. Paragraph. It is a section of a text that contains core information in the form of the main idea that is usually in the first sentence, supported by supporting sentences either in the form of example, comparison and contrast or cause and effect, followed by concluding paragraphs before moving to the next paragraph. Sentences in paragraphs are arranged by transitional words. Details. It is descriptions of objects so that readers will not be confused on the object being discussed. It is usually a description for foreign objects or terms. The details can be written in the forms of footnote, amplification, description or apposition. Quotations. It is the repetition of one expression as part of another one, particularly when the quoted expression is well-known or explicitly attributed by citation to its original source, and it is indicated by (punctuated with) quotation marks. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quotation)

16

f. Illustration. It is a decoration, interpretation or

visual explanation of a text, concept or process, designed for integration in published media, such as posters, flyers, magazines, books, teaching materials, animations, video games and films. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illustration)

g. Running title/head. It is usually placed above or

below the text usually contains the title of the book or the chapter title or the name of the author of a book. h. Initials. It is the affirmation of the letter or sentence prefix in each chapter is done in bold and makes the size of a letter bigger than the other letters. 4) The Back Matter (Postliminary Section) This Postliminary section is the final part to close the contents of the book. It is placed between the main part and the back cover of the book. This postliminary part consists of: a. Closing notes. It usually contains conclusions or summaries or adding relevant material or information. b. Glossary. It is a list of alphabetical terms or a list of words related to a particular subject, text, or problem with a clear and complete explanation or definition. It is also similar to a short dictionary.

17

c. Attachments/Appendices. It is a separate sheet as part of the manuscript which is attached as an additional document that can be a reference or information that is more extensive and complete. Attachments can be in the form of pictures, tables, charts, diagrams, interview scripts, and others.

d. Index. It is in the form of a list of terms contained in the book accompanied by a page where the term appears without any meaning and arranged alphabetically to facilitate searching e. Referencing list. It is a list of all the sources used (and cited) in an assignment. It is alphabetised according to the names of the authors. Each entry in the referencing list contains detailed information about one source. f. Writer biography The structure and parts of the book above are general book compilers. In fact the structure or parts of the book compilers above still adjust to the needs and each type of book. For certain types of books may require additional certain parts to complete the book, but there are also some types of books that not all of the above are just compiling sample books on novel types of books which of course do not need a bibliography. Source: https://bookprinting.com/resources/parts-of-a-book

18

Parts of a Book

Source: https://bookprinting.com/resources/parts-of-a-book

Figure 3.1 Part of a book

19

Source: https://blog.reedsy.com/front-matter-back-matter-book/

Figure 3.2 Definition of parts of a book

20

On the other hand Casofa (2019) has other terms of a book structure or the anatomy of a book. He said that one important thing that will help us in writing a book is recognizing and mastering the anatomy of a book. Getting to know the anatomy of a book is one of the insights that must be kept in mind by an author. By knowing the anatomy of the book, we know which parts of a book that we should write and know how to do that. In fact, one of the conditions for a new book to be declared as a ‗book‘ is to have had a complete anatomy of the book you write. The anatomy of a book is parts of the book that complement each other, so a complete book is created. In relation to this section, Casofa (2019), as Suwarno did (2011), divided the book into a complete anatomy of the book. A. Anatomy of a Book: Preliminaries

It is located after the book cover. Parts of a book that is in the preliminaries section or front matter are as follows: 1 - French Page It is the front page of a book after the book cover. On this page only the main title of the book is written without any other information. It just contains the main title without publisher's name or

21

logo. The next page is the blank page. That is also called a half-title page. 2 - Main Title Page This page is the second page after the French page. It is located on the right and contains the title, subtitles, author's name, publisher's name and logo, as well as the year of publication and city of publication. 3 - Copyright Page This page is located on the left, and it is located after the main title page. On this page a brief history or data about the book is included, such as the book title, subtitle, author or translator's name, editor's name, illustrator's name, layouter's name, designer's name, publisher's name and address, code number of ISBN, year of publication, print or editions, publishing copyrights, and sometimes there are excerpts from copyright law. In the translated book, usually also included the original title, name of the original author, and the name of the original publisher. 4 - Offering Page This is the page that is commonly called Dedications. For those who are married, it is usually offered to their children and wives. Some give a little poem or a short motivational word quote. The

22

offering page is always on the right, and the reverse page is left blank. 5 – Thank page This page is also called acknowledgements. This page may or may not. Sometimes it is held, if indeed there are many parties who really help in the preparation of the book, so the writer needs to provide a separate page, because it must say thank you to many parties. However, if the thank note is small, the body can be inserted in the paragraphs in the preface. 6 – Welcome Note This page was provided by a competent figure who was asked to comment on the book. It may be more than one figure, so that the welcome note can be for many pages. However, some books without this page are also not a problem. 7 - Foreword It is written by someone else, not from the author of the book itself. It is written by someone other than the author and tells the readers why they should read the book. It is usually written by people who are competent with the theme of the book and comment on the contents of the book at a glance and also comment about the author at a glance as well.

23

8 – Preface Many are still confused between the foreword and preface. The foreword is written by another person or party, while the preface is written by the author of the book. A preface is written by the author and tells readers how and why the book came into being. So, actually, what is meant by the foreword and preface? Foreword is made by someone else, while preface is written by the author of the book. The preface just reviews the contents of the book and at a glance introduce the identity of the author. Usually, the foreward is given by experts or community leaders whose abilities or expertise relate to the material discussed in the book. Preface can also be made by the publisher. In the preface, the publisher introduces the purpose of book publishing and the advantages of the book compared to similar books that have been circulating in the market. Usually, it is also called an introduction to a publisher. If in a book there are more than two forewords, each of foreward should be no more than two pages. Meanwhile, the preface is an introductory writing from the author contains a review of the intentions and methods used by the writer. The preface should be no more than two pages, and at least one page. Usually, in the preface the writer also thanks the various parties who have helped with the writing of his book.

24

What was written on the preface? Describe whatever motivated you have to write the book and what is the purpose of writing the book. You also mention the advantages of the book compared to other books with the same theme on the market. Some special tricks and tips for reading the book. Finally, tuck in a thank you note for the people who helped with the publication of the book. 9 - Contents Page This page helps readers find certain information about the contents of the book. In the table of contents, it is not necessary to include the French page, the main title page, the copyright page, the offering page, the thank you page, and the contents page itself. 10 – List of table, list of illustrations or figures, and list of abbreviations and acronyms page This page is needed to help the reader hook information if it turns out that in the text there are many tables, illustrations, abbreviations, and acronyms. Anatomy of a Book: Text Section It is also called text matter, which is the essence of a book. It contains chapters, sub-chapters, to subchapters. All must be ordered so that it is easier for readers to read.

25

The End Section (End Matter) The end section is also commonly called the end matter, or often also refers to the endpoint or postliminary or reference pages. In this section there is a bibliography, glossary, appendices, index, and the author‘s biography. Not all must exist, depending on the needs of a book. But for nonfiction books, bibliography and about the author must exist.

26

Chapter

4

Criteria of a Book

4

Provision of textbooks is best after going through field trials and evaluating the results of these trials. As revealed by Chaedar (2002) steady textbooks appear as a result of professional stringing of steps, namely manuscript writing, study and revision of the manuscript. Field trial results, evaluation of trial results, revised manuscripts based on evaluation results are mass produced. Evaluation includes documentation of teacher and student impressions when using textbooks. Greene and Petty (1971) in Husen (1997, pp. 187-188) proposed the criteria for evaluating textbooks include several aspects as follows: 2. The textbook should be of interest to children, that is, students who use it. 3. The textbook must be able to motivate students who use it. 4. The textbook must contain illustrations that interest students who use them.

4

Translated from Husen, Akhlan. 1997. Telaah Kurikulum dan Buku Teks Bahasa Indonesia. Jakarta: Depdikbud posted in http://www.guruberbahasa.com/2016/05/kriteria-buku-teks-yang-baik-danbenar.html. Retrieved on November 2, 2019.

27

5.

The textbook should consider aspects of linguistics, so that it is in accordance with the abilities of the students who use it. 6. The textbook content must be closely related to other lessons; even better if you can support it with a plan, so that everything is a unified and integrated roundness. 7. The textbook must be able to stimulate, stimulate the personal activities of students who use it. 8. The textbook must consciously and firmly avoid vague and unusual concepts, so as not to confuse the students who use them. 9. The textbook must have a clear and firm point of view so that it will eventually become the point of view of the loyal users. 10. The textbook must be able to provide stability, emphasis on the values of children and adults. 11. The textbook should be able to appreciate the personal differences of the students who use it. Textbooks that are declared to be of use suitability for primary and secondary education units are determined by ministerial regulations. This determination is based on the results of an assessment conducted by the National Education Standards Agency (BSNP). From this, there will be a number of textbooks declared suitable for use in schools for all subjects in an educational unit. Each school must specify a textbook that will be used for

28

a period of five years based on elections made through educator meetings. In line with this, to choose a textbook to be used for an educational unit selection procedures are needed. One procedure that can be chosen is through consideration conducted by educators. Aspects that need to be considered are the appropriateness of the material, the presentation of the material, the use of language and its readability, the quality of the exercises and questions presented, as well as accessibility to textbooks. Each aspect is detailed in the following. 1. Conformity of Material The appropriateness of material contained in standardized textbooks will be selected through an educator meeting (teacher meeting). At the meeting, educators or teachers must adapt the material contained in the textbook to the situation of the school. Adjustment of this textbook so that the material contained in the book can support the vision and mission of the school. In addition, the suitability of the material in question is that the material developed has power for the learning process. The material in the textbook must be in line with the concept of education. The inadequacy of the material in the textbook with the concept of educational science will also affect the

29

learning objectives as well as the viis and mission of the school. In adjusting the material, the material contained in the textbook must also be material that is accurate, current, and in accordance with the context and thinking ability of students. The importance of adjusting this material will also affect student learning outcomes. Educators must be able to choose textbooks that are material according to the physical condition of students and the environment in which students are studying. 2) Presentation of Material Presentation of textbooks is an important aspect for educators to consider in choosing national standard textbooks. Aspects that need to be considered are. (a) Presentation of the concept map and learning objectives are easily understood by students. (b) The order of material and the relationships between materials is presented systematically and logically. (c) Presentation of material and illustrations / pictures motivates students to learn. (d) The material presented encourages student feedback and self-reflection. (e) Anatomy of the book is presented with a model that is easily understood by students.

30

3.

Language, Readability and Graphic Another very important aspect for textbooks is the language used. In addition, the aspect of readability (readability) will determine the understanding and attractiveness of textbooks. Another aspect is graphics which also determines the quality of a text book. Therefore, in selecting a book it is necessary to consider the following aspects: a) Accuracy in using word choices and language styles. The accuracy in choosing words in a textbook must be in accordance with the level of the reader (students). This will affect the students' understanding of the material being taught. b) Sentences used are generally easy to understand. The sentences used in the book must be sentences that are easy to understand and the inter-relationships must also be coherent. There must be no sentence that will make students more confused when using the textbook. c) The paragraphs presented are not confusing. The paragraphs in the book must also be cohesive. This means that the relationship between paragraphs with one another must be clear and easy to understand. d) Having legibility that is appropriate for the reading age of the students. Readability questions the level of difficulty or the level of

31

e)

ease of a particular reading material for the ranking of certain readers. This will relate to the language of a textbook (words, sentences, paragraphs, discourse) that is suitable for the level of the reader. The use of book layout and typography can improve students' understanding. The use of appropriate typography in a textbook will make it easier for students to understand the material in question.

4. Exercise and Questions One feature that distinguishes textbooks from other types of books is the availability of exercises and questions. Therefore, in choosing a textbook it is necessary to consider this aspect. The things that need to be considered are as follows: a) The exercises and questions developed are quality and functional. In a textbook must pay attention to the selection of questions and exercises. Quality and functional questions and exercises do not mean difficult questions. b) Exercises in accordance with the basic competencies learned. The exercises in the textbook should not deviate from the material being taught or the basic competencies learned so as not to confuse students in doing the exercise.

32

c)

Questions used to measure the ability of students in a comprehensive manner. Comprehensive questions will stimulate the brain of students to think more broadly about the material they have learned.

5. Accessibility to Text Books Another aspect that is also very important in choosing a textbook is the accessibility of the textbook. Even though other aspects have been considered, if this aspect is neglected, of course it is still very difficult to have the selected textbook. Therefore, in choosing textbooks, the following things need to be considered: a) The textbook is easy to obtain. b) The price of textbooks is affordable by the availability of the budget or students. Consider these two aspects so that there is no student discrimination. Good books don't have to be expensive books. This consideration is sought so that all students in any places can have the book at a price that is appropriate and easy to have.

33

34

Chapter

5

Course book, Textbook, and Handout 5

A. The Difference between Textbook, and Handout

Coursebook,

1) Textbooks A textbook is a handbook for a course written and compiled by experts in related fields and fulfills the rules of a textbook and is published officially and distributed (Pedoman PAK Dosen 2009). 2) Textbooks or reference books It is a scientific writing in the form of a book whose substance focuses on one field of study. Textbooks discuss a fairly broad topic (one area of science). The order of the material and the structure of the textbook are compiled based on the logic of the field of science (content oriented), officially published for marketing (Panduan Penulisan Buku Teks). 3) Handout 5

Adapted from Kemenristekdikti, LLPTWXII. (2019). Perbedaan Buku Teks, Buku Ajar dan Buku Diktat. Kementrian Riset, Teknologi, dan Pendidikan Tinggi, Lembaga Layanan Pendidikan Tinggi Wilayah XII. Copyright © 2019 LLDIKTI WILAYAH XII. All Rights Reserved. Posted in http://lldikti12.ristekdikti.go.id/2012/09/22/perbedaan-buku-teks-buku-ajardan-buku-diktat%E2%80%8F.html. Retrieved on November 2, 2019.

35

Handout is teaching material for a course written and compiled by the instructor of the course, following the rules of scientific writing and disseminated to the participants of the lecture (Pedoman PAK Dosen 2009). B. The Characteristics of Coursebook, Textbook, and Handout 1) Textbooks 1. Trying to generate interest in reading; 2. Designed and written for students; 3. Explaining instructional objectives; 4. Used by lecturers and students in the lecture process; 5. Arranged based on learning patterns that are flexible, systematic and structured based on student needs and the final competency to be achieved; 6. Focusing on providing opportunities for students to practice; 7. Providing a summary; 8. Communicative writing style; 9. Providing feedback; 10. Accommodating student learning difficulties; 11. Explaining how to study teaching materials. 2) Textbook 1. Assuming the interest of the reader;

36

2.

For readers (teachers, lecturers, students, researchers, general); 3. Not necessarily explain instructional goals; 4. Designed to be widely marketed; 5. Arranged linearly and its structure is based on the logic of the field of science; 6. Not necessarily provide training; 7. Not necessarily giving a summary; 8. Narrative writing style, not communicative and concise; 9. There is no mechanism for gathering feedback; 10. Not accommodating learning difficulties; 11. Not explaining how to study textbooks. 3) Handout 1. Teaching Materials for a Subject 2. Written by the Subject Teacher 3. Following the Scientific Writing Rule 4. Disseminated to Lecture Participants On the other hand Nurdiansyah (2016) proposed general specification of coursebook. There are at least seven specifications as follows: 1. Book typed on a computer with a font size Time New Roman 12 or Cambria 11 (eleven); 2. The book has an ISBN and is circulated (distributed);

37

3. The number of pages of the book is not less than 200 pages, not including the preliminaries section and postliminaries; 4. Minimum size of 15.5 cm x 23 cm; 5. Published by scientific bodies / organizations / universities; 6. Do not deviate from applicable scientific writing regulations and codes of conduct; 7. One book for 1 (one) subject. Beside that he also described seven contents on the page of a coursebook. In writing each page of a coursebook, here are some recommendations that can be considered: 1. Each paragraph contains one point; 2. Use short paragraphs; 3. Use short sentences, so they are easy to remember (about 10-14 words); 4. Each page makes it interesting and easy to remember verbally and visually (typography and layout); 5. Each page contains; text, graphics, tables, pictures (photo / diagram), inset reminders, inset history); 6. Write motivational & inspiratory sentences; 7. The numbering model in the book can follow the following numbering numbers.

38

Chapter

6

Book Cover

McDaniel (2019) gives tips and strategies for creating an amazing book cover. He proposes four main steps that must be followed by a book cover designer. 1) Know and Understand the Intent of Your Book The book you write is like a message that will be conveyed to the reader. The reader is your consumer who will be the goal you want to achieve. If you write a nonfiction book, then the contents must go directly to the reader's brain, whereas if you write a fiction book, then the contents must go directly to the reader's heart. Therefore you must be able to translate it into an appropriate volume. If you write a novel that contains a message of love, then you must create a volume that contains the sensation of love. 2) Look at Successful Covers in Your Genre Before you make a book cover, you should look around or browse some examples of book covers on the internet. Millions of book covers are available on the internet. Look at some book covers that you like. Note the advantages and make it all as the beginning of your inspiration to make the best and interesting book cover. Make sure that your choice to determine

39

the cover of the book to be made is the best example. 3) Pre-Made Covers Making a book cover is indeed not easy. This is a complicated job. You must be an expert in graphic design. If not, you can order someone or hire someone to make a book cover that suits your taste, even if you have to spend quite a lot of money, because if you order a book cover is expensive. You can look for a cheap cover designer but usually the results are not good. 4) Remember that Book Covers are Only Partly Art The book cover that we make does indeed contain a bit of an element of art, but it also contains elements of psychology and science, therefore we must be good at playing the main information about our book in a book cover. The size and attractiveness of the font is very influential on book marketing activities. Sometimes the font of the author's name is made larger and contrasted than the title of the book because sometimes people will buy the book not because of the title but because of the famous author. See the following parts of a book cover (McDaniel, 2019).

40

Source: https://www.adazing.com/tips-and-strategies-for-creating-the-perfectbook-cover/

Figure 6.1 The anatomy of a book cover

Figure 6.2 The example of a book cover

41

A. The front cover It is the front view or face of the book located at the beginning of the book (Suwarno, 2011).

Figure 6.3 The example of a front cover (1)

42

Figure 6.4 The example of a front cover (2)

43

Figure 6.5 The example of a front cover (3)

44

Figure 6.6 The example of a front cover (4)

B. Back cover

45

It is a cover that is located at the end or the back of the book that covers the book (Suwarno, 2011).

Figure 6.7 The example of a back cover (1)

46

Figure 6.8 The example of a back cover (2)

47

Figure 6.9 The example of a back cover (3)

48

Figure 6.10 The example of a back cover (4)

49

C. Spine It is usually on thick books which are located on the side or between the front and back cover as a protective thickness of the book (Suwarno, 2011).

Figure 6.11 The example of a spine

50

Figure 6.12 The examples of spines

D. Endorsement It is a sentence of support given by the initial reader written on the back of the book cover as a form of reinforcement and the allure of a printed work (Suwarno, 2011). Here are a few examples of great endorsements taken from Green Leaf Book Group (2019): Credibility

51

''...a delightful guide full of important information for those of us who want to enjoy the companionship of our best travel partners, our parents.'' — Samantha Brown, Television Travel Host & AARP Travel Ambassador Specificity “… Matthew S. Hiley takes readers on a dark, twisted and hilarious journey into the perilous world of parenting with Baseball Dads. This motherfu**er is a homerun!” — Brandon Christopher, author of The Job Pirate Call to Action "Carrie Morgridge has written a must-read primer for anyone considering philanthropy…Read this book - and learn from one of the best." — Katherine Bradley, President, CityBridge Foundation

52

https://self-publishingschool.com/book-endorsements/

Figure 6.13 The example of an endorsement

E. Dust Jacket or Dust Wrapper It is made for the aesthetics of the issue or also showing exclusivity and something different from the book. The tongue cover usually contains a photo along with the life history of the author or a summary of the book which is also commonly referred to as the ear of a book or book jacket (Suwarno, 2011).

53

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dust_jacket#/media/File:Dust_jacket.jpg

Figure 6.14 The example of a dust jacket

Figure 6.15 The examples of dust jackets

54

Chapter

7

The Front Matter

1. Title page It contains title, sub-title, author's name, translator's name, to the publisher. Many books also add French pages or epidermis pages that only contain book titles.

Source: https://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ld/resources/writing/harvard/content/copy_of_2.1-booktitle-page

Figure 7.1 The structure of a title page

55

Literary Translation: The Anthology

Rudi Hartono (Ed.)

2019

Figure 7.2 The example of a title page (1)

56

Source: https://www.latextemplates.com/template/classic-linedtitle-page

Figure 7.3 The example of a title page (2)

57

2.

A blank page It is usually located behind a French page that does not contain any information. Some publishers use this page to display copyright law.

Figure 7.4 The example of a blank page

58

3.

Copyright notice It is on this page contains the title of the book, the name of the author/author/translator, the copyright owner to the publication team such as the cover design and illustrations.

Source: https://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ld/resources/writing/harvard/content/copy _of_2.1-book-title-page

Figure 7.5 The structure of a copyright notice

59

OBOT (One Book One Teacher) Copyright © 2019 by Rudi Hartono, et al. All rights reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review. Editor: Rudi Hartono Cover designer: Rudi Hartono

Printed in Semarang, Indonesia First Printing, 2019 ISBN 978-623-7263-86-9

Publisher LPPM UNNES Press Gedung Prof. Retno Sriningsih Satmoko Lantai 2 Kampus Sekaran Gunungpati Semarang Kode Pos: 50229 Telp: (024) 8508089 Fax: (024)8508089 Email: [email protected] Member of the Association of Indonesian Publisher (IKAPI)

Figure 7.6 The example of a copyright notice

60

4.

Additional pages It is additional pages containing preface or introduction from the author, foreword, and akcknowledgment

Preface Translating literary works is very challenging because it is not only translating the form of language but also reproducing the nearest natural equivalent. This book is your choice to lead you to be a literary text translator. It is a very significant reference for all students who follow translation classes or concern translation studies. This book contains several units focusing on how to study literary translation. It guides learners to how to translate literary words form one language to another, especially from English to Indonesian or vice versa. The chapters provide E-Litrans Tool for the better literary translation, prose translation, novel translation, poetry translation, idiom translation, proverb translation, metaphor translation, personification translation, assonance translation, and alliteration translation. Referring to the previous books of translation, this book is more complete than the books are available and published by several publishers. This book provides clear and actual theories, and examples. On the other hand this book is also enriched with many samples of translation. The translation samples are provided for students as the translating practice and model. Besides using this book, students can use other materials of translation from other resources, such as printed and online resources, websites, and other compilation of literary translation. Through this book, students and teachers can practice their translation of literary texts well and professionally. Hopefully all students especially who are learning how to translate literary works in general can use this book as the main reference. Thanks for your attention and have a nice practice of literary translation. Semarang, 20th October 2019

Rudi Hartono Writer

Figure 7.7 The example of a preface (1)

61

Source: https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/27/Supplement_1/iii

Figure 7.8 The example of a preface (2)

62

Source: https://water.usgs.gov/owq/FieldManual/Chapter2Archive/Archive/images/forword.gif

Figure 7.9 The example of a foreword (1)

63

Source: https://retrievia.wordpress.com/2008/03/28/foreword/

Figure 7.10 The example of a foreword (2)

64

Acknowledgment Alhamdulillah, thank Allah for His Blessing in helping me compile this book of ―Literary Translation: The Anthology‖. Sholawat and Salam, be up to him, the Prophet Muhammad SAW, the leader of Islam leading the man from the darkness to the lightness. In relation to this book, I thank everybody who contributes materials of literary translation, particularly for those who provided very valuable materials as the main source of this book (All of my students of Translation Studies, Graduate Program, Universitas Negeri Semarang), the web owner, maker, or provider and whoever attached photos or pictures in general. May Allah the Almighty give you the rewards. I hope this book will be useful for those who want to learn how to translate texts, especially students who are concerning with literary translation, and practicing how to translate literary texts. Thanks for your attentions and have a nice study of Literary Translation: The Anthology.

Rudi Hartono Editor

Figure 7.11 The example of an acknowledgment (1)

65

Source: https://joblatter.com/15-sample-book-acknowledgement-page/

Figure 7.12 The example of an acknowledgment (2)

66

5.

Table of contents Contents

List of abbreviations List of figures 1. Introduction 2. Design 1: Steel I-girder bridge 2.1. Superstructure 2.2. Abutments 2.3. Construction method3 3. Design 2: Super T-beam bridge 3.1. Superstructure 3.2. Abutments 3.3. Construction method 4. Comparison of designs 4.1. Costing 4.1.1 Construction phase 4.1.2 Ongoing maintenance 4.2. Safety 4.3. Aesthetics 5. Conclusions and recommendations 6. References Appendices: Appendix 1: Design 1 scale drawings Appendix 2: Design 2 scale drawings

ii iii 1 2 2 3 4 4 5 6 7 7 7 8 8 9 10 11

Figure 7.13 The example of a table of contents (1)

67

The Contents page sets out the sections and subsections of the report and their corresponding page numbers. It should clearly show the structural relationship between the sections and subsections. A reader looking for specific information should be able to locate the appropriate section easily from the table of contents. Sections are numbered using the decimal point system. Section numbers appear on the left margin, page numbers on the right. (Taken from https://www.monash.edu/rlo/assignmentsamples/engineering/eng-writing-technical-reports/table-of-contents)

68

Source: https://www.monash.edu/rlo/assignment-samples/engineering/engwriting-technical-reports/table-of-contents

Figure 7.14 The example of a table of contents (2)

69

Contents Preface Acknowledgments Contents Chapter 1 Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

Chapter 6

Chapter 7

Chapter 8

Chapter 9

Chapter 10

Chapter 11

Chapter 12

Problems of Translating Literary Works Rudi Hartono Prose Translation Ajeng Hidayatul Maghdalena Aditya Dwi Nugrahanto Nadiyatul Uswatun Hasanah Poetry Translation Eli Sadora Maya Puspita Mahanani Novel Translation Jajang Nooralam Sarah Franciska Xaveria Kurniawati Film Translation Heru Priyatna Rinasa Intan Cita Shabrina Nur Husna Idiom Translation Eka Fanti Sulistiyaningsih Adhe Risky Mayasari Proverb Translation Endang Susilowati Perwari Melati Akmilia Etik Khusnul Khotimah Metaphor Translation Zulfa Nabila Laili Widya Ningrum Personification Translation Fathna Sofia Hajar Henny Kusumawati Yatimul Chatimah Simile Translation Agus Dwiyanto Diah Ayu Setianingrum Assonance Translation Fitriana Kartika Sari Kiki Yulina Astuti Alliteration Translation Billy Ardy Dwiwiyanto Muhammad Zaiim Muhtadi Umniyyatul Makmuroh

The Editor’s Bio

v vi vii 1 7

17

31

41

47

55

65

75

83

93

101

110

Figure 7.15 The example of a table of contents (3)

70

Chapter

8

The Text Matter

The text matter or the body is the main part or section of a book. It is the essence of a book that contains chapters, sub-chapters, and sub-subchapters. It is the part that contains and discusses the information or core material of the book. 1) Introduction It is a prefix before the reader reads the subject matter so that the reader knows why the subject matter needs to be discussed. Chapter 1 A.

Introduction

Background This research is based on the concerns on the quality of students‘ translation of literary texts, especially the translation of idioms, figures of speech, and proverbs from Indonesian into English. E-Litrans Tool as an online translator application is a solution to improve the quality of translations. The main objective of this research is to help translators improve the quality of their translation to be more natural and acceptable. The specific target of this research is to improve the quality of translation of literary texts (idioms, figures of speech, and proverbs) from Indonesian to English in the translation class. The research method used is an experimental method that uses two classes as a control group and an experimental group with one treatment using the E-Litrans Tool. The population was 40 students from two classes selected by using total sampling technique. The data were be analysed using the t-Test formula. This research is planned to be completed in 8 months.

Taken from (Hartono, et al., 2019, p. 1)

Figure 8.1 The example of a book introduction (1)

71

Source: https://www.slideshare.net/MarucaMaruca/introducing-sqlserver-20081

Figure 8.2 The example of a book introduction (2)

2. Chapter Title

72

It is a part of a book that usually consists of several chapters where each chapter discusses a specific general topic Chapter Numbering.

Source: https://www.iup.edu/graduatestudies/resources-for-currentstudents/research/thesis-dissertation-information/writing-your-thesis-ordissertation/apa-sixth-edition-subtitle-levels/

Figure 8.3 The example of chapter title (1)

73

Source: https://id.pinterest.com/pin/195554808804812083/?lp=true

Figure 8.4 The example of chapter title (2)

74

3. Paragraph It is the part where the writer sets out the content or what is to be presented. In connection with the above phenomenon, researchers find some lexical, grammatical, and structural translation errors in literary works (Hartono, 2001). This translation error results in an inaccurate, unnatural and difficult to understand translation (Nida and Taber, 1982; Larson, 1984; Silalahi, 2009), so that it can be said that the translation results are lacking or even not of quality. The problem of translation as above encourages researchers to analyze the problem further and provide a solution for translators of literary texts in general and students of the translation classes in the English Language and Literature Department of FBS UNNES in particular. In connection with these problems the researcher made an E-Litrans Tool to be applied in the process of translating proverbs and language styles from Indonesian to English. The application of the E-Litrans Tool will greatly assist translators and the results of this research will be a significant solution and contribution to the development and development of science and technology in general and the translation of literary works in particular. Taken from (Hartono et al., 2019, p. 2)

Figure 8.5 The example of paragraph(s)

75

4. Details It is descriptions of objects so that readers do not confuse the object being discussed, usually for foreign objects or terms. A detail can be a footnote, description, amflication, or apposition.

Source: https://www.quora.com/Word-Definitions-Terminology-and-Jargon-What-is-a-footnoteand-give-an-example-for-footnote-by-reading-a-textbook

Figure 8.6 The example of a footnote Original sentence: ―The thesis paper was difficult.‖ After amplification: ―The thesis paper was difficult: it required extensive research, data collection, sample surveys, interviews and a lot of fieldwork.” Source: https://literary-devices.com/content/amplification/

Figure 8.7 The example of an amplification "This is a valley of ashes--a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens; where ashes take the forms of houses and chimneys and rising smoke and finally, with a transcendent effort, of ash-grey men, who move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air." (F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, 1925) Source: https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-apposition-1689127

Figure 8.8 The example of an apposition

76

5. Quotations It is the repetition of one expression as part of another one, particularly when the quoted expression is well-known or explicitly attributed by citation to its original source, and it is indicated by (punctuated with) quotation marks. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quotation)

Quotation 1: Robinson (1977) (in Suparman, 2003, pp. 144145) states that in general the difficulties include cultural and linguistic aspects, while Newmark (1988) adds that the difficulties arise due to cultural influences and moral goals. (Hartono, 2019b, p. 4)

Quotation 2: To have a good and standardized course, a writer should follow the process of course book writing. There are five steps of course book writing process. See the figure 1. There are five stages of the course book writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing (Trimansyah, 2018a, pp. 24-26; 2019b, p. 15). (Hartono, Purwanto, and Bahri, 2019b, p. 60)

77

6. Illustration It is a decoration, interpretation or visual explanation of a text, concept or process, designed for integration in published media, such as posters, flyers, magazines, books, teaching materials, animations, video games and films. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illustration)

Source: https://www.shutterstock.com/image-vector/education-treeknowledge-open-book-effective-767491552

Figure 8.9 The example of an illustration

78

7. Table Placement of the table must be close to the related material. If it is not possible because it adjusts the layout, it should be numbered.

Source: http://www.fao.org/nr/water/aquastat/countries_regions/Profile_segments/IDNGeoPop_fra.stm

Figure 8.10 The example of a table

79

8. Running title/head It is usually placed above or below the text usually contains the title of the book or the chapter title or the name of the author of a book.

Source: https://turnkey.com.au/tldoc/usr-con-str-rhd.html

Figure 8.11 The example of running head (1)

Source https://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/running-head-format-forapa-style-papers.html

Figure 8.12 The examples of running heads (2)

80

9. Initials It is the affirmation of the letter or sentence prefix in each chapter is done in bold and makes the size of a letter bigger than the other letters.

Source: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2012/04/drop-capshistorical-use-and-current-best-practices/

Figure 8.13 The example of initials

81

10. Side-note Side-notes are notes that are references or brief summaries that are on the margins outside the page or next to the text relating to the problem being discussed.

Source: http://www.kahrel.plus.com/indesign/sidenotes.html

Figure 8.14 The example of a side-note

82

11. Footnote It is a superscript number (1) that is placed within the body of text. It can be used as a form of citation in certain citation styles or a provider of additional information. Citation styles such as Chicago A, OSCOLA, Turabian and ACS require the use of footnote citations instead of author-date in-text citations.1 1

Courtney Gahan, What are footnotes and endnotes? Amsterdam: Scribbr, 2018. Source: https://www.scribbr.com/citing-sources/what-are-footnotes-andendnotes/

Figure 8.15 The example of a footnote (1)

Source: https://www.the-tls.co.uk/damn-footnotes/

Figure 8.16 The example of a footnote (2)

83

84

Chapter

9

The Back Matter

The back matter is the postliminary section or the final part that is close to the contents of the book. It is placed between the main part and the back cover of the book. This postliminary part consists of: 1. Closing notes It usually contains conclusions or summaries or adding relevant material or information. “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain ―But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she‘s going to adopt me and sivilize me and I can‘t stand it. I‘ve been there before.‖ This is a heartbreaker. Twain rounds off his masterpiece by saying that Huck Finn is fated, like all Americans, to an incessant quest for the challenge of the frontier. For sheer teenage disaffection, it‘s matched by the last line of Catcher in the Rye: ―Don‘t tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody.‖ Source: https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2012/jul/29/10-bestclosing-lines-books

Figure 9.1 The example of a closing note

85

2. Glossary It is a list of terms alphabetically or a list of words related to a particular subject, text, or problem with a clear and complete explanation or definition. It is also similar to a short dictionary.

Source: https://www.slideshare.net/westy67968/glossary-25575539

Figure 9.2 The example of a glossary

86

3. Attachments/Appendices The attachment or appendix is a separate sheet as part of the manuscript which is attached as an additional document that can be a reference or information that is more extensive and complete. Attachments can be in the form of pictures, tables, charts, diagrams, interview scripts, and others.

Source: https://www.nap.edu/read/22052/chapter/13

Figure 9.3 The example of an appendix

87

4. Index An index (plural: usually indexes, more rarely indices) is a list of words or phrases ('headings') and associated pointers ('locators') to where useful material relating to that heading can be found in a document or collection of documents. It is in the form of a list of terms contained in a book accompanied by a page where the term appears without any meaning and arranged alphabetically to facilitate searching. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Index_(publishing)

Source: https://www.prismnet.com/~hcexres/textbook/indexing.html

Figure 9.4 The example of an index

88

5. Reference list It is a list of all the sources used (and cited) in an assignment. It is alphabetised according to the names of the authors. Each entry in the reference list contains detailed information about one source. This usually includes the author's name, the year of publication, the title of the source, and other publication details. References Durie, M. (2003). Ngā kāhui pou: Launching Māori futures. Wellington, New Zealand: Huia. Hazledine, T., & Quiggan, J. (2006). Public policy in Australia and New Zealand: The new global context. Australian Journal of Political Science, 41(2), 131–143. Lazar, J. (2006). Web usability: A user-centered design approach. Boston, MA: Pearson Addison Wesley. Ministry for Primary Industries. (2012). Food safety. Retrieved from https://www.mpi.govt.nz/food-safety Source: http://owll.massey.ac.nz/referencing/what-is-referencing.php

Figure 9.5 The example of a reference list

89

6. Author’s biography It is a brief description of the author describing his work, place of work, works produced and other experiences related to the book he wrote. Author’s Biography

Dr. Rudi Hartono, S.S., M.Pd. is an English lecturer of English Language and Literature Department, Faculty of Languages and Arts, Universitas Negeri Semarang (UNNES). He is also an English language consultant, translator and English textbook writer. He teaches EnglishIndonesian and Indonesian –English Translation (Theory and Practice), Translation Workshop, Translation Studies, Academic Writing, Advanced Writing, Academic English, and Research in Education. He got bachelor degree of English Literature from Padjadjaran University Bandung, Master‘s degree of English Education from Indonesia University of Education, and Doctoral degree (Applied Linguistics: Translation Studies from Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta). His research and interests are translation studies and textbook writing. He has written some papers of translation published by several national publishers: Translation: A Way to Get the Knowledge; Introducing West Java Cultural Aspects in English Textbook; Translating a Novel: Problems and Solutions (A Holistically Critique on Novel Translation; Translating Metaphors from English Into Indonesian: Problems and Solutions; Teaching Translation by Using a Cooperative Work Procedure (Journals), English Texts in Use (A LiteracyBased Approach): A Course book for SMA Students; A Communicative English Grammar.

Figure 9.6 The example of a writer biography

90

Chapter

10

Textbook Evaluation

Related to the evaluation of a textbook, Hartono (2015) gives the questions to answer as the criteria of a good book. It can be clarified from the the following questions: 1) Does the book help the target learner develop the communication skills effectively? 2) Does the book encourage cooperative learning? 3) Does the book provide conciousness-raising activities for the discovery of linguistic features? 4) Does the book attempt to personalize the learning process by getting learners to relate topics and texts to their own lives, views and feelings? 5) Does the book contain a variety of activities for learners to use different learning strategies ? 6) Does the book offer choices to cater for learners‘ differences? 7) Does the book provide helpful referencial materials (e.g. vocabulary lists, tape transcripts, answer keys, indexes, etc.? 8) Does the book include the use of computer and internet technology to support independent learning?

91

Concordia University Library (2018) proposed some criteria of evaluating a book. The followings are the criteria intended. A. Authority/authorship  Who is the author and what is their expertise in the subject area?  Do they have any professional affiliations?  Is their work experience or education relevant?  Are any of their other publications relevant? B. Currency/timeliness  When was it published?  Is the information still relevant?  Has the book been updated? Is there a more recent edition? C. Coverage/relevance  Is the book relevant to your topic?  Does it have the depth you require?  Review the table of contents and the index to confirm the information you require is covered in the book and to what extent. D. Purpose/audience  What is the author‘s motivation?  Who are the intended readers? The content will vary depending on the book‘s targeted audience. It could be very general and introduce the

92

readers to a subject. Conversely, the content could be very specific, aimed at other scholars in the field. E. Accuracy/documentation  Is there a bibliography or list of references?  Can you identify research data?  What was the editorial process?  Is this information reliable? F. Objectivity/thoroughness  What perspectives are given, or ignored?  Be alert for bias. The author may represent only one side of a topic or argument.

93

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280943540_TEXTBOOK_EVALUATION_CHECKLIST

Figure 10.1 The example of a Textbook Evaluation Checklist (1)

94

Source: https://www.sampleforms.com/book-evaluation-forms.html

Figure 10.2 The example of a Textbook Evaluation Checklist (1) Page 2

95

Source: https://www.sampleforms.com/book-evaluation-forms.html

Figure 10.1 The example of a Textbook Evaluation Checklist 2 (Page 2)

96

References Alaydrus, R. 2017. 7 Karakteristik Guru Abad 21. Retrieved from https://pendidikkreatif.wordpress.com/2017/01/ 07/7-karakteristik-guru-abad-21/ on October 2, 2019. BC. 2019. The Planning Stage of Writing. BCourse Berkeley Edu. Retrieved from https://bcourses.berkeley.edu/courses/1357555/ pages/b-dot-3-1-the-planning-stage-ofwriting?module_item_id=13261220 on October 2, 2019. Casofa, F. (2019) Berkenalan dengan Anatomi Buku [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://fachmycasofa.com/anatomi-buku/ on October 30, 2019. Collins, B. 2019. How to Write a Book in 2019: A Definitive Guide for Writer. Become a Writer Today. Retrieved from https://becomeawritertoday.com/how-to-writea-book/ on October 1, 2019. Concordia University Library. (2018). How to evaluate books. Concordia University Library, updated on Tuesday 9 January 2018. Posted in https://library.concordia.ca/help/evaluating/evaluatin g-books.php. Retrieved on November 3, 2019.

97

ConnectedPE. (2019). 10 Ways to Be More Productive As a Teacher. Retrieved from https://connectedpe.com/10-ways-to-be-moreproductive-as-a-teacher/ on October 1, 2019. Green Leaf Book Group. (2019). Examples of Good Endorsements for Your Book. https://greenleafbookgroup.com/learningcenter/book-marketing/examples-of-goodendorsements. ©2019 Greenleaf Book Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Retrieved on November 2, 2019. Hartono, R. (2015, May 10). Evaluating the criteria of English textbook [PowerPoint slides]. Semarang, Indonesia: English Dept. UNNES. Hartono, R. (2016). Improving Students‘ Translation Products. The 5th ELTLT International Conference Proceedings. ISBN 978-602-737693-9. October, pp. 593–598. Hartono, R. (2019, July 20). Implementasi One Book One Teacher Program bagi guru SMA Islam Terpadu Bina Amal Kota Semarang [PowerPoint slides]. Semarang, Indonesia: PkM UNNES. Hartono, R., Purwanto, B. and Bahri, S. (2019a). One Book One Teacher Program for Upgrading Teachers‘ Writing Competence (A Descriptive Survey). Unpublished Society Service Project Report 2019. Semarang: Universitas Negeri Semarang.

98

Hartono, R., Purwanto, B. and Bahri, S. (2019b). One Book One Teacher Program for Upgrading Teachers‘ Writing Competence (A Descriptive Survey). Language Circle: Journal of Language and Literature, 14 (1) October 2019, 059-066. Hartono, R. et al. (2019a). A Monograph on ELitrans Tool Application for Literary Translation. Semarang: LPPM UNNES. Hartono, R. (Ed.). (2019b). Literary Translation: An Anthology. Semarang: LPPM UNNES. Husen, Akhlan. 1997. Telaah Kurikulum dan Buku Teks Bahasa Indonesia. Jakarta: Depdikbud posted in http://www.guruberbahasa.com/2016/05/kriteria -buku-teks-yang-baik-dan-benar.html. Retrieved on November 2, 2019. Ihsan (2018). Satu Guru Satu Buku (Sagusabu) Bersama Media Guru. Diunduh dari http://ihsan.gurusiana.id/article/satu-guru-satubuku-sagusabu-bersama-mediaguru-5295313 Imran, S. (2014, December 05). Struktur dan Bagian-bagian penyusun Buku secara Umum. [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://ilmupendidikan.net/pustaka/buku/bagian-penyusunbuku

99

Kemenristekdikti, LLPTWXII. (2019). Perbedaan Buku Teks, Buku Ajar dan Buku Diktat. Kementrian Riset, Teknologi, dan Pendidikan Tinggi, Lembaga Layanan Pendidikan Tinggi Wilayah XII. Copyright © 2019 LLDIKTI WILAYAH XII. All Rights Reserved. Posted in http://lldikti12.ristekdikti.go.id/2012/09/22/perb edaan-buku-teks-buku-ajar-dan-bukudiktat%E2%80%8F.html. Retrieved on November 2, 2019. Kompasiana (2018). Panggilan Menulis "Satu Guru Satu Buku". Diunduh dari https://www.kompasiana.com/thsalengke/5b0e3 daacaf7db7850549c92/panggilan-menulis-satuguru-satu-buku Maslani (2017). Literasi dan Gerakan Satu Guru Satu Buku. Diunduh dari https://blog.igi.or.id/literasi-dan-gerakan-satuguru-satu-buku.html McDaniel, CJ. (2019). Tips and Strategies for Creating the Perfect Book Cover. Posted in https://www.adazing.com/tips-and-strategiesfor-creating-the-perfect-book-cover/. Retrieved on November 2, 2019. Nurdiansyah, B. (2016, October 26). Mari menulis buku ajar, inilah format penulisan buku ajar yang baik [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://www.duniadosen.com/mari-menulisbuku-ajar-g028/ on November 2, 2019.

100

Oebaidillah, S. (2017). Tingkatkan Literasi, Guru Diminta Kreatif Menulis Buku. Retrieved from http://mediaindonesia.com/read/detail/105878tingkatkan-literasi-guru-diminta-kreatifmenulis-buku Putra, R.M.S. (2007). How to Write Your Own Text Book: Cara Asyik Mambuat Buku Ajar yang Powerful! Bandung: Penerbit Kolbu. Rahayu, S. (2017). Guru Penulis, Satu Guru Satu Buku. Diunduh dari http://www.jurnalasia.com/opini/guru-penulissatu-guru-satu-buku/ Rappahannock. 2014. How to read a college textbook. Rappahannock Community College. Retrieved from https://www.slideshare.net/rsgrfn/anatomy-of-atextbook?from_action=save on October 3, 2019. Setiati, S. (2012, Juni 20). Anatomi dan struktur buku ajar [PowerPoint slides]. Pelatihan Buku Ajar Kopertis Wilayah VI. Jawa Tengah, Indonesia: Ditjen Dikti Kemendikbud. Suwarno, W. (2011). Perpustakaan & Buku: Wacana Penulisan & Penerbitan. Jogjakarta: Ar-Ruzz Media. Trimansyah, B. (2018). Catatan Anti Bingung Menulis Buku Ilmiah: Membedah Pedoman Dikti dan LIPI dalam Penulisan-Penerbitan Buku Ilmiah. Jakarta: PT. Inkubator Penulis Indonesia (IPI).

101

Trimansyah, B. (2019a). Editing Pedia: Segala Hal tentang Editing Naskah Yang Perlu Anda Ketahui. Jakarta: PT. Inkubator Penulis Indonesia (IPI). Trimansyah, B. (2019b). Konversi KTI non buku menjadi buku [Handout]. Jakarta, Indonesia: Inkubator Penulis Indonesia (IPI). Trimansyah, B. (2019c, July 15). Tentang penulisan buku dari hasil penelitian dan sertifikasi penulis buku [PowerPoint slides]. Semarang, Indonesia: UNNES Press. Universitas Negeri Semarang. Trimansyah, B. (2019d, July 16). Penulisan buku ajar [Handout]. Semarang, Indonesia: Jurusan Bahasa dan Sastra Inggris, FBS UNNES. Watson, A. (2019). How to get started writing and publishing a teaching book. Retrieved from https://thecornerstoneforteachers.com/publishin g-a-teaching-book/ on October 1, 2019.

102

Glossary accessibility

accuracy acknowledgement

address

affirmation agency

amplification

animation

annotate

appendix

: the practice of making your websites usable by as many people as possible : the quality or state of being correct or precise : an author's or publisher's statement of indebtedness to others, typically one printed at the beginning of a book. : a place where a person or organization may be communicated with asked for someone‘s name : state of being affirmed : the capacity of individuals to act independently and to make their own free choices : the action of enlarging upon or adding detail to a story or statement : a method in which pictures are manipulated to appear as moving images : to add notes to (a text or diagram) giving explanation or comment : the section at the end of a

103

apposition

:

attachment

:

audience

:

author

:

availability

:

back cover

:

back matter

:

book that gives additional information on the topic explored in the contents of the text a relationship between two or more words or phrases in which the two units are grammatically parallel and have the same referent an extra part or extension that is or can be attached to something to perform a particular function the assembled spectators or listeners at a public event, such as a play, movie, concert, or meeting a writer of a book, article, or report the quality of being able to be used or obtained back of the book; the cover on the opposite side of the front cover The parts of a book that appear after the main portion of the body text, including the afterword, index and bibliography; the

104

bibliography

:

blank page

:

blurry

:

book

:

book anatomy book block

: :

book cover

:

book shop

:

book title

:

end matter a list of the books referred to in a scholarly work, typically printed as an appendix a sheet of paper that does not have anything written on it not clearly or distinctly visible or audible. a stack of usually rectangular pages oriented with one edge tied, sewn, or otherwise fixed together and then bound to the flexible spine of a protective cover of heavier, relatively inflexible material parts of a book The block of internal pages that make up the book any protective covering used to bind together the pages of a book bookstore or a place of business where books are the main item offered for sale The title of a book, or any

105

book-trade chapter

chart

citation

coherence

competence

concept conclusion

other published text or work of art, is a name for the work which is usually chosen by the author : The buying and selling of books : a main division of a book, typically with a number or title : a sheet of information in the form of a table, graph, or diagram : a quotation from or reference to a book, paper, or author, especially in a scholarly work : a clear relationship between parts, esp. in a work of literature or art : the quality or state of having sufficient knowledge, judgment, skill, or strength (as for a particular duty or in a particular respect) : an abstract idea; a general notion : the last part of something, its end or result

106

copyright

credibility decoration

dedication

definition

description

details diagram

dictionary

: the exclusive legal right, given to an originator or an assignee to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or musical material, and to authorize others to do the same : the quality of being trusted and believed in : the process or art of decorating or adorning something : the quality of being dedicated or committed to a task or purpose : a statement of the exact meaning of a word, especially in a dictionary : a spoken or written representation or account of a person, object, or event : extended treatment of or attention to particular items : a simplified drawing showing the appearance, structure, or workings of something; a schematic representation : a book or electronic

107

discourse

:

document

:

draft

:

draft document

:

drafting

:

dust jacket

:

resource that lists the words of a language (typically in alphabetical order) and gives their meaning, or gives the equivalent words in a different language, often also providing information about pronunciation, origin, and usage speak or write authoritatively about a topic a piece of written, printed, or electronic matter that provides information or evidence or that serves as an official record a preliminary version of a piece of writing the product the writer creates in the initial stages of the writing process the preliminary stage of a written work in which the author begins to develop a more cohesive product sometimes book jacket, dust wrapper or dust cover of a book is the detachable outer

108

edit

:

editing

:

edition

:

end matter

:

endnote

:

endorsement

:

evaluation

:

example

:

cover, usually made of paper and printed with text and illustrations prepare (written material) for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it the process of selecting and preparing writing, photography, visual, audible, and film media used to convey information a particular form or version of a published text written matter following the main text of a book; back matter; matter-written works (especially in books or magazines) a note printed at the end of a book or section of a book an act of giving one's public approval or support to someone or something the making of a judgment about the amount, number, or value of something; assessment one that serves as a pattern

109

exercise

:

feedback

:

figure

:

flyer

:

footnote

:

foreword

:

format

:

free writing

:

to be imitated or not to be imitated a process or activity carried out for a specific purpose, especially one concerned with a specified area or skill information about reactions to a product, a person's performance of a task, etc. which is used as a basis for improvement a diagram or pictorial illustration of textual matter a small handbill advertising an event or product a note of reference, explanation, or comment usually placed below the text on a printed page a short introduction to a book, typically by a person other than the author the way in which something is arranged or set out a prewriting technique in which a person writes continuously for a set period of time without regard to spelling, grammar, or topic

110

genre

glossary

grammar

graphics guide book

handout

: a category of artistic composition, as in music or literature, characterized by similarities in form, style, or subject matter : an alphabetical list of terms or words found in or relating to a specific subject, text, or dialect, with explanations; a brief dictionary : the whole system and structure of a language or of languages in general, usually taken as consisting of syntax and morphology (including inflections) and sometimes also phonology and semantics : an image or visual representation of an object : a book of information about a place, designed for the use of visitors or tourists : printed information provided free of charge, especially to accompany a lecture or advertise something

111

headbands

illustration

index

initials

instruction

interpretation

: coloured threads (normally mercerized cotton or silk) which are wrapped around a core of some sort (normally vellum backed with leather) and are then sewn through the signatures, filling space left between the spine and the book block : a picture in a book, magazine, etc. or the process of illustrating something : an alphabetical list of names, subjects, etc., with references to the places where they occur, typically found at the end of a book : the first letter of a name or word, typically a person's name or a word forming part of a phrase : detailed information telling how something should be done, operated, or assembled : the act of explaining, reframing, or otherwise showing your own

112

interview script

:

introduction

:

ISBN

:

knowledge

:

layout

:

literature review

:

logo

:

manuals

:

understanding of something an interview transcript; a set of written questions and prospective answers that a candidate will likely provide during an interview making something known for the first time, or formally telling two people who the other person is The International Standard Book Number facts, information, and skills acquired by a person through experience or education; the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject draft; outline; the way in which the parts of it are arranged a comprehensive summary of previous research on a topic a symbol or other design adopted by an organization to identify its products, uniform, vehicles, etc. a book of instructions,

113

manuscript

:

OBOT outlining

: :

paragraph

:

peer review

:

picture

:

plagiarism

:

especially for operating a machine or learning a subject; a handbook. "a computer manual" a written or typewritten composition or document as distinguished from a printed copy also : a document submitted for publication One Book One Teacher drawing, tracing, or defining the outer edge or shape of (something) a distinct section of a piece of writing, usually dealing with a single theme and indicated by a new line, indentation, or numbering evaluation of scientific, academic, or professional work by others working in the same fiel a design or representation made by various means (such as painting, drawing, or photography) the practice of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them off

114

poster

:

preface

:

preliminary

:

presentation

:

print

:

procedure

:

as one's own a large printed picture, photograph, or notice that you stick or pin to a wall or board, usually for decoration or to advertise something a preliminary statement in a book by the book's author or editor, setting forth its purpose and scope, expressing acknowledgment of assistance from others, etc. preceding and leading up to the main part, matter, or business; introductory; preparatory: preliminary examinations the process of presenting a topic to an audience produce (books, newspapers, magazines, etc.), especially in large quantities, by a mechanical process involving the transfer of text, images, or designs to paper a series of actions conducted

115

proofreader

:

propriety

:

publication

:

publisher

:

publishing

:

punctuation

:

quotation

:

in a certain order or manner a person whose job is to check text before it is printed or put online the state or quality of conforming to conventionally accepted standards of behavior or morals the preparation and issuing of a book, journal, piece of music, or other work for public sale a person or company that prepares and issues books, journals, music, or other works for sale the business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature, information, musical scores or sometimes recordings, or art the act or practice of inserting standardized marks or signs in written matter to clarify the meaning and separate structural units a group of words taken from

116

quotation mark

:

reference

:

repetition

:

resource

:

review

:

a text or speech and repeated by someone other than the original author or speaker each of a set of punctuation marks, single (‗ ‘) or double (― ‖), used either to mark the beginning and end of a title or quoted passage, or to indicate that a word or phrase is regarded as slang or jargon or is being discussed rather than used within the sentence the use of a source of information in order to ascertain something the action of repeating something that has already been said or written a source of supply, support, or aid, especially one that can be readily drawn upon when needed a formal assessment or examination of something with the possibility or intention of instituting change if necessary

117

revise

running title

self-reflection

side-note

spine

story

: to look at or consider again an idea, piece of writing, etc. in order to correct or improve it : "the title or abbreviated title of a volume printed at the top of left-hand text pages or sometimes of all text pages". It allows readers to determine which paper they're looking at just by glancing at the top of the page. : meditation or serious thought about one's character, actions, and motives. : a note of reference that is set in the side margin or a page usually in smaller type than the text : the part of a book's jacket or cover that encloses the inner edges of the pages, facing outward when the book is on a shelf and typically bearing the title and the author's name : an account of imaginary or

118

sub-chapter

:

subtitle

:

summary

:

syllabus

:

table

:

table of contents

:

tail text matter

: :

textbook

:

real people and events told for entertainmen a subdivision of a chapter: such as a subunit of a chapter of an organization captions displayed at the bottom of a movie or television screen that translate or transcribe the dialogue or narrative a brief statement or account of the main points of something an outline of the subjects in a course of study or teaching a set of facts or figures systematically displayed, especially in columns a list of the chapters or sections given at the front of a book or periodical The bottom part of the book content; a document or publication in any form. Content is both information and communication a book that contains detailed information about a subject

119

title page

:

Transition(al) word

:

typographical error

:

visual

:

for people who are studying that subject a page at the front of a book on which you find the name of the book, the writer, and the publisher words that help connect or link ideas, phrases, sentences, or paragraphs misprint, a mistake (such as a spelling mistake) made in the typing of printed (or electronic) material a picture, piece of film, or display used to illustrate or accompany something

Taken from lexico.com, merriam-webster.com, en.wikipedia.org, yourdictionary.com, en.wiktionary.org, dictionary.cambridge.org, vocabulary.com, ibookbinding.com, careertrend.com, collinsdictionary.com, dictionary.com, academia.stackexchange.com, and kidskonnect.com

120

Index accessibility, 29, 33, 103 accuracy, 8, 31, 103 acknowledgements, 23 acronyms page, 25 additional pages, 61 address, 22, 103 affirmation, 17, 81, 103 amplification, xii, 16, 76, 103 anatomy, xi, 5, 10, 12, 21, 41, 101 animations, 17, 78 annotate, 7, 103 appendices, 26 apposition, xii, 16, 76, 104 audience, 7, 9, 92, 104, 115 author, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 40, 52, 53, 55, 59, 61, 80, 83, 89,

90, 92, 93, 103, 104, 105, 106, 108, 110, 115, 116, 118 availability, 32, 33, 104 back cover, xi, 12, 13, 14, 17, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 85, 104 back matter, 10, 85, 104, 109 basic demands, 1 bibliography, 7, 18, 26, 93, 104, 105 blank page, xi, 14, 22, 58, 105 blurry, 4, 105 body, 10, 23, 71, 83, 104 book anatomy, 5, 10, 105 book cover, xi, 3, 9, 12, 14, 21, 39, 40, 41, 51, 105 book deliveries, 11 book draft, 7

121

book shop, 9, 105 book traders, 11 books, vii, 1, 2, 11, 13, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 32, 33, 35, 50, 55, 78, 85, 97, 105, 106, 109, 115, 116 brief history, 22 budget, 9, 33 cause and effect, 16 chapter title, xii, 17, 73, 74, 80 chapters, 12, 16, 25, 71, 73, 119 charts, 18, 87 citation, 16, 77, 83, 106 city of publication, 22 code number of ISBN, 22 coherence, 106 cohesive, 31, 108 comparison and contrast, 16 competence, 1, 106 concept, 17, 29, 30, 78, 106

concluding paragraph, 16 conclusions, 17, 85 consumer, 39 contents, 3, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 23, 24, 25, 38, 39, 67, 68, 69, 85, 103 contents page, 25 copyright law, 22, 58 copyright notice, xi, 59, 60 copyright page, 14, 25 course book, v, vii, xi, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 77 course book writers, 1, 2 cover, 2, 5, 7, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 39, 40, 41, 45, 46, 53, 59, 100, 104, 105, 108, 118 credibility, 107 current curriculum, 3 data, 4, 8, 22, 71, 76, 93 decoration, 17, 78, 107, 115

122

definition, 17, 86, 107 description, 16, 76, 90, 107 details, 16, 89, 107 diagram, 38, 103, 106, 107, 110 diagrams, 18, 87 dictionary, 17, 86, 107, 111, 120 discourse, 32, 108 discuss, 7, 35 document, 18, 87, 88, 108, 114, 119 draft, 4, 9, 108, 113 drafting, vii, 3, 4, 7, 77, 108 dust jacket, xi, 54, 108 dust wrapper, 108 edit, 7, 109 editing, vii, 3, 4, 7, 9, 77, 109 editions, 22 editor, 9, 22, 115 educators, 1, 29, 30 efforts, 1, 2 end matter, 26, 104, 109 end section, 26

endnotes, 83 endorsement, xi, 14, 53, 109 evaluation, 27, 91, 95, 96, 109, 114 example, xi, xii, 16, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 94, 95, 96, 109 exercises, 29, 32 experience, 4, 92, 113 facilitate, 1, 2, 18, 88 factors, 1 facts, 4, 8, 113, 119 feedback, 30, 36, 37, 110 figure, 3, 7, 23, 77, 110 figures, 13, 25, 67, 71, 119 films, 17, 78

123

final drafts, 3 flyers, 17, 78 footnote, xii, 16, 76, 83, 110 foreword, xi, 15, 24, 61, 63, 64, 110 formats, 3, 7 free writing, 7, 110 French page, 14, 22, 25, 55, 58 front cover, xi, 12, 13, 14, 42, 43, 44, 45, 104 front matter, 10, 14, 21 gather idea, 7 genre, 111 glossary, xii, 26, 86, 111 grammar, 7, 110, 111 graphics, 31, 38, 111 guide book, 12, 111 half-title page, 22 handout, 111 ideas, 1, 2, 4, 7, 9, 114, 120 identify, 7, 93, 113

illustration, v, xii, 78, 110, 112 index, xii, 26, 88, 92, 104, 112 indexes, 88, 91 information, 4, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 21, 25, 40, 52, 58, 68, 71, 73, 83, 85, 87, 89, 92, 93, 103, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 116, 117, 119 initial drafts, 3 initials, xii, 81, 112 inner motivation, 1 inset history, 38 inset reminders, 38 institution supports, 1 institutions, 1 instruction, 1, 2, 112 integration, 17, 78 interpretation, 17, 78, 112 inter-relationships, 31 interview scripts, 18, 87

124

interviewing experts, 4 in-text citation, 7, 83 introduction, vii, xii, 14, 15, 24, 61, 71, 72, 110, 113 knowledge, 11, 78, 106, 113 layouter, 22 learning objectives, 30 left blank, 23 legality, 8 lesson materials, 1, 2 lesson plan, 3 Linguistics, 4, 90, 129 list of abbreviations, 25 list of illustrations, 25 literature review, 4, 113 literature study, 4 logo, 13, 22, 113 magazines, 17, 78, 109, 115 main part, 5, 10, 15, 17, 71, 85, 115 main title page, 22, 25

manual instructions, 12 manuals, 12, 113 manuscript, 18, 27, 87, 114 manuscripts, 3, 27 materials, v, vii, 1, 3, 30, 91 mechanism, 37 motivation, 1, 2, 92 name of the original author, 22 name of the original publisher, 22 nonfiction book, 26, 39 OBOT, i, iii, iv, v, vii, ix, 1, 2, 3, 114 OBOT program, 3 offering page, 23, 25 One Book One Teacher, i, iii, iv, v, vii, ix, 1, 2, 98, 99, 114 online shop, 8, 10 opportunities, 1, 36 opportunity, 1, 2 original source, 16, 77

125

outlining, 7, 114 paragraphs, 4, 8, 16, 23, 31, 32, 38, 120 peer review, 7, 114 photo, 38, 53 pictures, v, 18, 30, 38, 87, 103 plagiarism, 4, 8, 114 posters, 17, 78 postliminaries, 5, 10, 38 postliminary section, 85 preface, xi, 15, 23, 24, 25, 61, 62, 115 preliminaries, 5, 10, 21, 38 preliminary page, 14 presentation, 11, 29, 115 prewriting, vii, 3, 4, 7, 77, 110 print, 13, 22, 107, 115 printing agencies, 11 problems, 2, 15, 75 procedures, 12, 29 process, xi, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 17, 29, 36, 75,

77, 78, 91, 93, 107, 109, 110, 112, 115 proofreader, 9, 116 propriety, 4, 8, 116 publication, 12, 15, 25, 59, 89, 94, 109, 114, 116, 119 publishers, vii, 3, 8, 11, 14, 58, 90 publishing, vii, 3, 7, 8, 22, 24, 77, 88, 102, 116 publishing copyrights, 22 punctuation, 7, 116, 117 purpose, 7, 24, 25, 107, 110, 115 questions, 29, 31, 32, 33, 91, 113 quotation, 16, 77, 106, 116, 117 quotation marks, 16, 77 read, 7, 14, 23, 25, 52, 87, 101 readability, 29, 31 recipes, 12

126

reference, vii, xii, 3, 18, 26, 35, 87, 89, 106, 110, 117, 118 reference list, xii, 89 references, vii, 7, 82, 93, 112 referencing list, 18 repetition, 16, 77, 117 research results, 4 resources, vii, 1, 2, 18, 19, 55, 59, 73 reverse page, 23 revise, 7, 118 revising, vii, 3, 7, 77 running head, xii, 80 running title, 118 schools, 1, 2, 28 section, 4, 14, 15, 16, 17, 21, 26, 38, 68, 71, 103, 109, 114 self-reflection, 30, 118 sellers, 11 sentence order, 4, 8 sentences, 31, 32, 38, 120 side-note, xii, 82, 118 significant, vii, 1, 7, 75 spelling, 7, 110, 120

spine, xi, 13, 50, 105, 112, 118 stories, 11 sub-chapters, 25, 71 subtitle, 22, 73, 119 subtitles, 22 summaries, 17, 82, 85 summary, 36, 37, 53, 113, 119 supporting sentences, 16 syllabus, 3, 119 table of contents, xi, xii, 25, 67, 68, 69, 70, 92, 119 tables, 18, 25, 38, 87 teacher-writers, 1 teaching materials, 2, 3, 17, 36, 78 text, 5, 10, 15, 16, 17, 25, 31, 38, 71, 78, 80, 82, 83, 86, 103, 104, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 115, 116, 118, 119 text matter, 15, 25, 71, 119

127

textbook, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 76, 88, 90, 91, 98, 101, 119, 129 the original title, 22 think, 4, 7, 33 title, xi, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 21, 22, 40, 55, 56, 57, 59, 80, 89, 105, 106, 117, 118, 120 title page, xi, 12, 55, 56, 57, 120 tongue, 53 transitional words, 16 Trimansyah, 3, 4, 7, 8, 77, 101, 102 Typographical error, 4

video games, 17, 78 visual explanation, 17, 78 welcome note, 23 words, 17, 31, 32, 38, 86, 88, 104, 107, 111, 116, 120 write, v, vii, xii, 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 21, 23, 24, 25, 39, 75, 77, 90, 97, 104, 108, 120, 129 writer biography, xii, 90 writing process, 3, 7, 10, 77, 108 year of publication, 13, 22, 89

128

The Authors’ Bio Dr. Rudi Hartono, S.S., M.Pd. is a Ph.D of Translation Studies teaching English lecturer of English Language and Literature Department, Faculty of Languages and Arts, Universitas Negeri Semarang (UNNES). He is also an English language consultant, translator and English textbook writer. He teaches EnglishIndonesian and Indonesian –English Translation (Theory and Practice), Translation Workshop, Translation Studies, Academic Writing, Advanced Writing, Academic English, and Research in Education. He got bachelor degree of English Literature from Padjadjaran University Bandung, Master‘s degree of English Education from Indonesia University of Education, and Doctoral degree (Applied Linguistics: Translation Studies from Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta). Bambang Purwanto, S.S., M.Hum is a Master of Humanities teaching English at English Language and Literature Department of Faculty of Languages and Arts, Semarang State University, Indonesia. He got bachelor‘s degree of English Language and Literature from Diponegoro University Semarang, and Master‘s degree of Humanities from Diponegoro University Semarang. Seful Bahri, S.Pd., M.Pd. is a Master of English Education teaching English at English Language and Literature Department of Faculty of Languages and Arts, Semarang State University, Indonesia. He got bachelor‘s degree of English Education from Yogyakarta State University and Master‘s degree of English Education from Universitas Negeri Semarang.

129