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2022-03 March Newsletter


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22 March

years

“We’re working off our successes”

$5K SCHOLARSHIPS

THE TRUE TEST

Two spots available for MPW employees

09 FOR THE RECORD

IW begins new testing center buidling project

08 VAC TO THE FUTURE

IW launches highest valued project to date

06

ISSUE

MPW’s exanpsion into industrial vacuuming

04 in this

featured stories

VAC UUM MPW Introduces Vacuum Trucks to the Industrial Cleaning World MPW’s entrance into industrial vacuuming is a story of entrepreneurship and innovation. It begins with the City of Columbus facing a challenge at its waste transfer stations. Trash would fall from conveyor belts and become a fire and safety hazard. The city looked for help to clean the conveyors. Several companies, including MPW, bid the project, each ready to send crews carrying shovels and brooms—except for us. We proposed the use of a vacuum truck, which could complete the cleaning much more

efficiently with a smaller crew. A vacuum truck was a unique solution at the time. “That’s what differentiated us,” said MPW Owner and Founder Monte Black, and MPW landed one of its first multi-year industrial vacuuming contracts. The crews would clean the material that fell from Monte Black the conveyor belts overnight from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., five days per week. Our fleet was growing to include wash trucks, water-blasters and vacuum trucks. We had accumulated 13 wash trucks before purchasing Unit 14, our first vacuum truck. We continued to build our vacuum truck fleet with units 15 through 17. We were always looking for more equipment, while at the same time picking up new customers and hiring more people. We were running wide open. It was challenging but so much fun! After we successfully completed a job at the Columbus and Southern Electric Company’s Conesville generating station, the phone kept ringing. Conesville asked us to clean a coal reclaim pit. The emergency job required

roughly 400 feet of vacuum hose going into what was basically a huge basement full of coal and equipment. The Conesville coal reclaim pit was a major opportunity. “We found a way to service the plant with our existing fleet,” Monte said. To maximize use of crews and equipment, Unit 14 would go to Conesville from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. to help clean the reclaim pit after it finished its night shift in Columbus. We ran all the vacuum trucks around the clock. It was fun, challenging and profitable. At times we would even have our mechanics service our equipment at plant sites. We couldn’t afford the lost time to take it back to the shop. We worked hard to serve our customers as the company grew. We continued to invest in equipment and people to meet our growth opportunities. Today, we have a fleet of several hundred vacuum trucks with Mack chassis and Super Products vacuum systems. We standardized our fleet of trucks for ease of repair and operator training long before Southwest Airlines standardized its fleet of planes. Our standardization was the beginning of a long-term relationship with Mack that helped foster innovation and productivity. In addition to Conesville, Columbus and Southern Electric (which sold out to AEP) had several generating stations, and we were household names in all of them. It was good work, and with those opportunities came competition. Years ago, like today, our initiatives and engineering skill allowed us to stay ahead. One way we used innovation to beat the competition was with vacuum pipe selection. Our competitors were us-

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ing 6-inch flex pipe for their vacuums while we used 8-inch hard pipe to optimize performance and outdo our competitors. We took every advantage we could to increase productivity and reduce cost. Industry competitors were using aluminum dredge pipe, which was expensive and wore out quickly when vacuuming abrasive material. We did our own research and began using HDPE (high-density polyethylene pipe) for all abrasive materials and non-heat-related jobs. We used heavier walled pipe for heat-related vacuuming and purchased our aluminum directly from the manufacturer for cost-savings. And then, we fabricated our own 20foot pipe sections and vacuum ends. As a result, we increased our pipe’s longevity. Innovation and professionalism set us apart. Crews always cleaned up the work site area after a job was completed. Another innovation was placing racks on our pick-up trucks to haul materials faster and more efficiently. Our trucks were clean, our crews looked more professional than the competitors and we took pride in our work. “We would not take short cuts,” Monte said. “We were never satisfied, and we were always striving to be the best in the business. Whether we were washing trucks, water-blasting or vacuuming we always had great equipment and our own approach to the work, but it was always the people who made the difference, then and now.” Our goal was to give our customers a little more than what they expected, so we could come back to do more. The work was challenging, and the days were long, but we always found a way to keep FUN in the equation. That’s what driven the growth of the company for the last 50 years! Our Steubenville Operations Manager

Gary “Moe” Berger had a famous line. He’d always say, “MPW vacuums; the competition sucks!” And then there was the time a large Pennsylvania steel mill hired MPW to clean a blast furnace. The purchasing agent insisted we needed to send 20 vacuum trucks to the cleaning job because that’s how many trucks the previous comMoe Berger panies sent. But we didn’t need 20 trucks. We rode in with 15 trucks and completed the job to their satisfaction, which got everybody’s attention. “If the plant wins, everybody involved wins,” Monte said. Industrial vacuuming procedures demand respect. Without the proper safety equipment and training, there are dangers. We are focused on industrial vacuuming safety, just like all our services. “Don’t lose your fear of this; this is real,” said General Manager Jimmy Peck. “I don’t think the Jimmy Peck industry as a whole has given as much attention to industrial vacuuming as MPW has.” MPW uses safety tools like Newson Gale devices and Safety T valves. High-tech robotic crawlers, with vacuuming and water-blasting technology, are increasingly used to enter tanks, large pipes, and other hazardous environments. “We’ll see more and more uses for the robotic crawlers,” said VP of Operations Dave Brown. Our employees are adapting to new technology by learning to clean with advanced automated systems instead of relying on traditional methods.

As an organization today, we are well positioned—with our strong workforce, and our engineering, IT and training departments working hand-in-hand with operations— to look for new initiatives and Dave Brown find more productive ways to serve our customers.

Our goal was to give our customers a little more than what they expected years 5

MPW’s Industrial Water business unit launched the highest-valued deal in its history — and right on schedule. “It was definitely full-team support,” said Industrial Water General Manager Tim Dondero. “It was a huge success across all the groups.”

IW LAUNCHES RECORD BREAKING PROJECT

Water was flowing through the PBF Delaware City refinery January 1, 2022 following completion of a $34.5 million customized over 10 years Build-Own-Op- Tim Dondero erate-Maintain (BOOM) System with multiple equipment units, producing all of the site’s process water. Dondero said technicians worked through holidays to meet a tight deadline. “It’s a bigger project than we usually do,” Dondero said. “We had a time frame to get this done. It’s very successful.” “Our people delivered a great system through determination, innovation, and the highest level of service,” said President Jared Black. “This is a great job from everyone involved and should lead to more jobs with this customer in the future.” The PFB Delaware City refinery is one of the largest and most complex refineries on the East Coast. It is located on a 5,000-acre site on the Delaware River. “We took on a large scope of the infrastructure,” said Director of Engineering Justin Pierce. “We provided a lot more than just equipment.” MPW assisted with a concrete pad, 6

BOOM pad at PBF Delaware City.

which utilizes underground conduit for electrical runs. MPW managed the main power feeds from the PBF switch house. MPW also successfully trenched and ran piping and electrical runs under one of the refinery roads to connect the treatment plant with the system tanks. Industrial Water Engineering Manager

Neil Dewitt said the new system processes 3,000 gallons per minute of RO (reverse osmosis water). “That makes this system one of the largest we’ve ever done,” he said. “It took about everyone on the engineering side to make this happen.” Dewitt said MPW installed six 670 gallons per minute RO Container units, two oil-

filled transformers, a MCC building and two large booster pump skids to produce product water to the refinery. The IT Department contributed servers to the project and the fabrication shop contributed the RO containers and pump skids. “The fabrication crew was on site for nearly eight weeks,” he said.

The PBF Delaware City project partly came as a result of MPW’s successful launch of a smaller project at Louisiana’s PBF Chalmette Refinery. “After that, PBF Energy had confidence that MPW could take on some larger projects,” Dewitt said. The PBF Delaware City project’s suc-

cess is garnering attention. “They’re asking us for more help,” Dondero said. He said the PBF Delaware City system is MPW’s second PBF project and the IW team is developing a solution for a third PBF project in California. “We’re working off our successes,” Dondero said. 7

THIS IS ONLY A TEST Industrial Water Expanding into new Testing Facility

Future site of IW Testing facility.

After years in the making, the Industrial Water Department is expanding its on-campus testing facility. “This is the right way we should be doing it,” said Industrial Water Mechanical Engineering Supervisor Garrett Petty. “Everyone is very excited Garrett Petty about this.” Currently, industrial water equipment testing takes place behind the heavy fabrication facility. “We’re going to enclose that whole space and expand its capabilities,” he said. MPW’s fabrication department currently inhabits approximately 12,000 square feet. The existing space does not adequately provide the square footage needed to accommodate the current work demand nor does it allow for growth. The new expansion will increase the square footage by roughly 8,400 square feet, for a total of approximately 20,400 square feet of enclosed workspace. The current testing facility can only test one piece of equipment at a time. The expansion will allow MPW to centralize all aspects of the department’s workload, eliminating the need for completing work at other MPW loca8

tions. It also will minimize downtime, allowing the department to work efficiently, be cost effective, and able to increase output. Petty said the existing facility has many limitations. “It becomes an ice skating rink during testing,” he said. There’s nothing easy about testing waterjet equipment outdoors during winter; everything freezes. “These guys want to get out of the cold,” Petty said. He said the new facility will also eliminate the need for MPW to turn around equipment at its Newark facility. In fact, the new facility will bring all IW testing and turnaround activities to the Hebron campus, saving a great deal of time and creating a safer work environment. Logistics Project Coordinator Graham Butler said IW equipment houses

sensitive instrumentation requiring regular maintenance and monitoring. “To get this done a field service tech would travel to the Service Center and do their best to repair and maintain the equipment,” he said. This often resulted in quick fixes and robbing other units of critical parts to get the desired unit ready for the next project. “As you could imagine, this led to many challenges and delays waiting on Graham Butler labor and parts to correct the issues from past projects and during service at the plants,” Butler said. The new IW facility will bring all testing

Testing facility floorplan.

operations under the same roof. Additionally, Butler said, with the Tech Center and fabrication facility next door, the repair and service time frames should shrink and allow for more major services along with proper testing to further reduce issues in the field. Petty said the crew will be able to test IW equipment at full capacity with the addition of a 15,000 gallon water tank, and the facility will have the ability to reclaim the water it uses during testing instead of running it down a Robb Spangler drain. Petty said the project was approved three years ago, but COVID-19 and soaring steel prices delayed construction. “We’re ready to break ground,” he said. The new IW testing facility will house its own softened water and DI trains, a boiler for hot water cleanings, chemical neutralization tanks, a clean water storage system, 1,500 gallons per minute pumps for proper flow testing and enough power to test multiple units at once. Electrical Engineering Supervisor Robb Spangler said a 60-foot blast booth is planned for installation. “This would be multipurpose,” he said. The booth would clean vehicles, including tractor trailers, vac trucks, containers and similar objects. “This would also be our testing facility for automated equipment,” Spangler said. “When we design and build new equipment today, sometimes it’s difficult to secure a water blaster and find a place to do testing outside. This would give us the ability to test our equipment under pressure, improving quality assurance.” Petty said the new facility will provide for the automated cleaning and testing of robotic equipment as well. He said the crew will be able to demonstrate new equipment running at full capacity to clients. “We’ll have the ability to show them running at rate,” Petty said.

Tip our caps Two WJTA scholarships are available to MPW employees and their families, but the application deadline is March 31, 2022. The WJTA—WaterJet Technology Association—is offering four $5,000 college scholarships to WJTA members, or their spouses, dependents or even grandchildren. WJTA President and MPW General Manager Jimmy Peck said two of the scholarships remain available and MPW employees and their families qualify as well as WJTA members. These scholarships are not limited to any field of study. Simply put, all MPW employees are encouraged to apply. It’s a great program just waiting for people to take advantage of it. The window for application is open until March 31, 2022 and applicants will be notified of award no later than May 15, 2022. Selection criteria include, but are not limited to scholastic achievement, financial need and community service and involvement. The scholarships will draw from an educational fund first established through a donation by Fun-Den Wang, Ph.D., a founding member of WJTA and a recipient of WJTA’s Pioneer Award. These scholarship awards are gifts to be applied toward the cost of tuition. Recipients’ only obligation is to do their best work possible. Recipients are not obligated to repay the WJTA, but it is hoped that they, too, will help others to obtain an education when they become successful in the field of their choice. Click here to learn more about the WJTA Scholarship Program. 9

giving a sheet

warehouse pursues total paperless operation

A forgotten computer helped the IS warehouse meet its team goal of becoming 80 percent paperless by the end of last year. “Here at the IS warehouse we decided to act on the paperless initiative,” said Warehouse Manager Dustin Kieber, who knew meeting Dustin Kieber the goal would be challenging and would require help. “In order to meet our and the company’s goal of becoming completely paperless we worked with our IT department to come up with a plan for us to have a mobile computer for the warehouse technicians to take with them around the shop to pull materials,” he said. Prior to working with IT, Kieber, Warehouse Lead Danny Gotschall and Warehouse Administrator Mary Powell investigated the warehouse’s paper use. They discovered on average the warehouse was using 500 sheets of paper Danny Gotschall each month, with

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most of the paper being used to pull jobs and writing each job request by hand or printing it from FDSS. “We started in 2019 by procuring an iPad,” Kieber said. “We learned in time that the iPad wasn’t going to be a long-term fix because it limited our ability to use some required functions.” The warehouse team met with IT Director Tony Miller and quickly found a solution. Another department had a mobile computer stand that was collecting dust.

Mary Powell

“The IT department brought the computer stand to the IS warehouse, we knocked the dust off it and put it to work,” Kieber said. “By having mobility with our computer, we were able to eliminate printing job forms and now save each job in a folder on the shared drive.” From there, Powell processes the paperwork and removes it as it is processed through JDE. The result is an 80 percent decrease in paper consumption. “Training our technicians and work-

ing with other departments made our goal a reality,” Kieber said. He said the IS warehouse currently only prints up to 100 pages per month. “We’re looking forward to continuing to reduce our paper usage even further in the coming months,” Kieber said. “It was all Dusty’s idea,” Miller said. “He took our goal of being paperless by 2025 to heart and he’s taken tremendous strides.” Miller said he was aware of a mobile computer cart equipped with battery power that could easily be moved around a warehouse when Kieber contacted him. The mobile system was acquisitioned for Tony Miller another project that changed, leaving it available. Miller encouraged all departments to review paper use because conserving paper may not be as difficult as it first appears. “Don’t be afraid to ask us (the IT department) for help,” he said. “The solution is probably easier than you think it is.”

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a day in the

In a company as diverse as MPW in people and professions, it’s easy for all employees to settle into their immediate surroundings and lose touch with what other departments do on a regular basis, even on the same campus. Per reader request to focus more upon all MPW employees, sometimes all we need to bridge this gap is to experience ‘A Day in the Life’ through our co-workers’ eyes. Each day is unique in accounts receivable. “I always begin my day with a plan of attack,” said Accounts Receivable Representative Vicki Turner. “But this often gets set aside if one of our field offices needs assistance with revised invoices, access to customer information portals or if a customer contacts our department and needs assistance with an incorrect billing or some other information.” Turner said she manages customer accounts for the Midwest and some of the South Atlantic districts as well as all facility and environmental customers including the former RFG/MPW relationship. On a weekly average she manages roughly 150 customers and a total of approximately $17,000,000 in receivables with an average 85 percent current. Turner said all accounts receivable group members work very hard to be preventive, so they are in constant contact with new customers to ensure they have everything necessary to pay MPW invoices on time. Accounts receivable group members are also in constant contact with known “problem customers” to try to prevent payment delays. Turner said her team also receives requests from customers, MPW salespeople and MPW Business Development team members to assist with forms necessary to set MPW up as a supplier for any new customer with whom MPW is working. “In between all of that, emails are sent to any customer with an invoice that is past due, or if it’s a new customer, I will touch base to make sure they have our invoice and ask if there is any12

life

thing they need from us to approve the invoice for payment,” she said.

“There is never a dull moment,” Turner said. “There is always something new to learn and my teammates are awesome—not only my accounts receivable teammates but all my Midwest, South Atlantic and IS teammates, too! We all help each other in any way we can. I feel blessed to work with these groups of people and with the entire MPW team.”

Turner, who joined MPW in September 2015, said her interest in accounts receivable can be traced back 14 years to her previous employer, where Turner was responsible for handling collections for five manufacturing plants with an average of roughly $20 million per week in receivables. “Our primary customer was a big box store whose accounts payable group was in India,” she said. Turner said all communication was via email, and proof of delivery packets had to be compiled and submitted electronically for any disputed invoice or deduction taken that her department disputed. “I enjoyed the challenge of researching and was dubbed as Nancy Drew by my boss,” she said. Turner said her department contributes to MPW by collecting customer payments so MPW can pay its suppliers and employees. “This is how companies grow and keep everyone happy,” she said. “I always say we (the accounts receivable group) are the janitors and we mop up the messes! We are the back-end discovery group and bring problems to light to be resolved by MPW team effort.”

Vicki Turner accounts receivable representative

accounts receivable representative 13

Business Manager Spotlight industrial air with jeff amburn MPW’s new Industrial Air Division is taking flight, said Industrial Air Business Manager Jeff Amburn, a nearly 30-year veteran of the compressed air industry who joined MPW roughly a year ago. “Customers like the technology packaging and services that MPW provides for Industrial Water, so now the new Industrial Air Division is providing complete industrial air compressor rooms in modules,” he said. Amburn’s responsibilities focus on providing compressed air sales education to the sales force, finding ways to reach out to new and existing customers, meeting with customers to discuss their air-system issues and challenges and walking through customer compressor rooms. “It’s all in an effort to provide the best MPW compressed air solutions at a competitive price,” he said. The Industrial Air Division team’s hard work is quickly gaining attention. “In the first few weeks of the MPW Compressed Air Solution Market Introduction we’ve had one customer visit at Hebron, several interested customer meetings and a few requests for quotations,” Amburn said. “We’re very busy following up on those inquiries.” The division produces a Compressed Air Solutions (CAS) module featuring a 350HP centrifugal oil-free compressor and a twin-tower desiccant dryer to achieve a -40 degree, Class “0” air quality. “Our potential customers seem very impressed,” Amburn said. 14

Often, compressed air components are the single highest electrical energy users in an industrial facility. Amburn said MPW’s solution is to package energy-saving compressors into the compact, easy-to-utilize modules. “The CAS modules that MPW builds are probably the best example of our innovation,” he said. Amburn said outstanding customer service begins by asking many questions regarding a customer’s current compressor room situation. “Customers who have old equipment often have issues affecting service costs and reliability,” he said. Frequently, customers don’t have all of the required back-up compressors they need, which can lead to very costly downtime issues. A failed compressor can result in tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost output productivity. Also, more companies are losing their maintenance groups to attrition and retirement. “MPW shows customers how the CAS modules can help to solve these issues by providing equipment that’s MPW maintained and monitored to ensure the highest reliability,” Amburn said. Amburn said global supply chain issues affect every aspect of the production process, but he and the Industrial Air Division team is finding solutions. “In an effort to reduce supply issues, we are working closely with our key suppliers and building new industrial air modules in advance of customer requirements,” he said. Amburn’s background is in sales engineering, marketing, product management and business development with three different manufacturers in the compressed air industry. “MPW is an amazing company with a wealth of outstanding people,” he said. A former athlete, Amburn has four children with his wife of more than 40 years. “I live in the woods in Southeast Wisconsin,” Amburn said. He enjoys learning new things and has many interests, including reading, sales-psychology, traveling, walking, fishing, shooting and kayaking.

jpe month of the

Corporate Communications

TO: Joseph Roodhof Sustainability Manager Jose Santiago Material Handler Ryan David Material Handler

Not Your Average Joes Joe and his team, Jose and Ryan, truly represent MPW with reliability, teamwork, and respect day in and day out. Joe’s leadership is top notch and the way Jose and Ryan interact with Ricoh team members is what I hope all sites are experiencing. Joe, Jose and Ryan’s efforts are truly appreciated by all of us here. I just want to be sure the MPW Leadership Team understands how much we do appreciate them.

Frank Kalinowski Ricoh Digital Services Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

JPEs SUBMITTED BY BUSINESS UNIT

IS IW PK TOTAL

YTD

MONTHLY

The Purge Approaches IT prepares for email purge & archival Email is an important means of digital communication and information resource for MPW; however, managing it can be a challenge. As a rule, data sent by email is not usually stored at a separate location but resides in individuals’ mailboxes, creating fragmented data silos that expand daily. January 1, 2023, MPW will implement Email Archiving and Purging to support centralizing this fragmented information. To summarize, all emails between 2-3 years old will be archived and can only be accessed by an IT request. All email older than 3 years will be permanently deleted. The full policy is available on SharePoint. Email archiving and purging benefits include an added layer of security and data privacy, enhanced safeguards against data loss during cyber-attack, improved compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements and IT cost and effort reduction. It is recommended that all employees begin working with their teams to create a plan to centralize any valuable information that is currently being stored in email. Recommendations for storing this information include Microsoft Teams, SharePoint, M-Files, P-Drive, Intelex, and Salesforce. The IT Department is working with Training to create an LMS on best practices for storing information in these systems. All employees will be required to complete this training course.

89 39 More detail will be included in the LMS course and monthly email reminders. 0 0 Please contact your manager with questions or concerns. 2 1 91 40

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0 Violation Inspections

Arthur, TX. You keep MPW moving! The new Transportation Safety Program for 2022 is on SharePoint. Recommend including a review of programs in driver TBTs and meeting safety starters.

David Lopez

Richard Sewell

SAFET Y & training

SAFETY

Our March Safety Effort is the prevention of cuts, lacerations and punctures. Cuts on hands and fingers result in over 110,000 lost time cases annually, and studies indicate hands are the most likely body part injured.

These injuries are most often caused by contact with cutting or piercing objects. Most of those objects are pieces of metal, razors, knives, power tools, or nails. Prevention starts with situational awareness, good housekeeping, basic controls (like razor storage), and hav16

ing the right tools (look for opportunities and tools that are designed to remove hands and fingers from the hazard or that incorporate retracting blades). Include thorough JSAs, sharp razors and knives that require less cutting pressure, gloves and cut gloves, clear work steps and procedures, hazard recognition and mitigation, and training. The new Safety and Health Program for 2022 is on SharePoint. You should see a new Environmental Program soon – we removed and expanded

the environmental topics and initiatives from the previous SHE Program. It is recommended to include a review of these programs in Tool Box Talks and meeting safety starters. TRANSPORTATION SAFETY

To reduce speeding, Samsara in-cab speeding alerts were activated companywide effective March 1, 2022. What to expect? In-cab voice coaching alerts provide drivers immediate feedback on violations. In-cab voice coach alerts tell drivers if vehicle speed is either a set number

Eddie Sewell

Michael Dunlap

of mph or percent above posted limits. Activating this feature should reduce speeding (fewer unsafe behaviors) and save fuel (highway MPG 2.7% lower estimated). We encourage feedback and questions to help improve the system and driving:

Attention drivers: MPW will be transitioning to Donlen’s eCoupon. You will begin receiving eCoupon service reminders from Donlen —via email— when your vehicle is due for routine service such as an oil change or tire rotation. The email will list several vendor locations based on your branch address. This service is replacing the existing coupon books so please destroy the paper coupons. More information to follow in a forthcoming corporate communication. TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT The Training & Development team welcomes Nanette Vogel, the new Porta Kleen trainer. Please welcome her and introduce yourself.

and you will have two months from 2/2/2022 to complete these courses before they expire: • Samsara for Admins: Dashboard – One time • Samsara for Admins: Driver App – One time • Samsara for Admins: Camera & Driver Safety Score – One time • Samsara for Admins: Managing Hours of Service – One time • Managing Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers – One time Check the “My Training” LMS tab now to stay up to date (before April 2, 2022). Updated eCourses: • Air Purifying Respirators: Annual Refresher New to the LMS: • Silica Analyzers • Incident Investigation, Root Cause Analysis, and Corrective Action • Managing Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers • Coaching Drivers

Nanette Vogel

• Corporate Transportation Safety Office: 740-927-8790 • Jonathan Frye, Transportation Safety Supervisor • Aaron Thompson, D.O.T. Trainer

Drivers. If you drive vehicles for MPW or Porta Kleen (both CDL & Non-CDL), several training requirements are coming due Mid-March. Check the “My Training” LMS tab now to stay up to date.

Congratulations to our drivers who recently received Zero Violation Inspections: David Lopez, Yuma, AZ; Eddie Sewell, Sedalia, MO; Richard Sewell, Sedalia, MO; Michael Dunlap, Port

Managers who supervise drivers. You may have recently been assigned a safe driving-focused Leader Curriculum in the LMS. These courses are intended for managers who lead drivers,

Hebron Training Schedule: New Hire Orientation & OSHA-10 training are offered both in-person and virtually every Tuesday/Wednesday. Participants must be registered by noon each Monday. To register, participants, should email their information to [email protected], Safety and Training Coordinator. Let us know how we can serve you at [email protected] or [email protected] or just give us a call.

Mark your calendar • March 8-9: New Hire Orientation & OSHA-10

• March 15-16: New Hire Orientation & OSHA-10 • March 22-23: New Hire Orientation & OSHA-10 • March 29-30: New Hire Orientation & OSHA-10

Hebron Training Schedule

• March 23: Lunch-n-Learn Supervisor Coaching Techniques – using Telematics data presented by

Renee Lawson with USI Insurance Services. This training is intended for managers, supervisors, and others involved in fleet safety.

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Safety Observations anniversaries CORPORATE/SHOPS Michael Ludwig

Observation #165223 Observation: When unit UTCS1051 was brought into our shop for service, I opened the back door and there were 4 small oxygen tanks standing up and not secured and caps were off 2 bigger oxygen tanks. Michael Ludwig Action: I got ahold of Mike Munyun and he came to the shop and secured the 4 small tanks and we put the caps back on the 2 big tanks.

PORTA KLEEN/PKX Ethan Eden

Observation #165838 Observation: With the new style double hook lanyard on the back of the safety harnesses when hooked to the top of the step on the hydro trucks, you can walk all the way down the ladder and they will still not lock in place to prevent you from falling. After reading the tag it has a 6’ lock and not Ethan Eden until then. The old style single hook lanyards were auto locking and would lock into place after a few feet. Action: I was told great observation and that we would be going back to the original ones that were the Scorpion model. It would keep maintenance techs safer while climbing up the ladders and being on top of the trucks as well.

INDUSTRIAL SERVICES Deshay Peterson

Observation #164608 Observation: Observed a fire had started from the basement coming up the metal pole where we were working.



18

Deshay Peterson

Action: Instructed my crew to evacuate the building asap and do not return till issue resolved while looking for the shift supervisor that was sitting in the office. I alerted him on the fire and location so that they could take care of the issue at hand and made sure all MPW personnel are counted for.



_______________________________________________

Daniel Woofter

Observation #164572 Observation: Upon arriving onsite, the customer did not necessarily have a clear description of the work they wanted to complete. When walking the job down a clearer scope of work was presented that included an area that required a lock-out. I stopped the Daniel Woofter walk through to speak with the customer about the JSA from this morning not including a lock-out. Paperwork was then filled out correctly and the job started after the lock out was complete. Action: I spoke with Aaron Applegarth and talked with him how it was a good catch and we need to look out for things like that through the duration of this job.

INDUSTRIAL WATER Mason Bass

Observation #165225 Observation: While taking the LOTO and NFPA70E Electrical Intermediate courses, I went through the Lockout/Tagout course before beginning the electrical course. There is a section that deals with locking out electrical components. I discovered steps 4 and 5 of the lockout course are reversed. The quiz Mason Bass had a question asking the steps for making an electrically Safe Condition. I answered the question the way it is in the training and got the answer wrong. When it asked me to try again, I reversed the order as it appears in the LOTO LMS Course that I took before the lockout course and got the answer right. I would assume that if you hang the LOTO first then check power, if there is still power then the LOTO will have to be lifted to go any further? Action: I took the survey at the end and left a remark with the issue I found. I then reported my finding to my manager and then submitted a safety observation I also have attached the steps as well as the wrong answer and the right answer screen shots from the actual course.



Mike McGonagle Gibby Smith Moe Berger Max Humphreys Thomas Sterling Glenn Snapp Greg Armstrong Alton Shean Joshua Powers Charles Boring Mark Peck David Kamps Rodney Riley James Rogers Lawrence Zizzo Chad Littrell David Dietrich Chip Price Michael Allen Josh Nye Kevin Simpson Martin Peckens Travis Piatt Derek Asseff Scott Vogel William Rexroad Tim Dondero James Dukes Merla Pradel Heather Paul Jacob McCullough John Perie Cody Stewart Jon Paul

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Jeremiah Groves Gerald Thorntonii Bill Boring Brad Thompson Robert Ramirez Robert Abbott Scott Showman Raymond Wren Gregory Wright Carey Houck Mike Pope Johnathan Grogg Matthew Dawson Kyle Tyson Ryan Poythress Paul Pariseau Lucas Ricketts Mamadou Sy Alyssa Deeter Thomas Dye James Mitchell Christopher Gaynor John Hayhurst Gabriela Miranda Mitchell Bruns Rick Martin Benjamin Boehm Michael Earney Jordan Stoneking Anthony Sapp John Mundt Jeanna Eldridge Marlo Philpott Jerry Ratliff

7

rockport, in

7

steubenville, oh

7

hebron

7

pittsburgh

7

tustin, ca

7

Lancaster, Oh

7

hebron

7

cleveland

6

great lakes

6

south atlantic

6

central florida

6

morgantown, wv

6

hebron

6

hebron

6

sedalia, mo

6

georgetown, sc

6

rockport, in

5

Marysville, oh

5

Rockport, in

5

Steubenville, oh

5

Cheshire, oh

5

Rockport, in

5

Morgantown, wv

5

chattanooga, tn

5

hebron

5

Rockport, in

5

Midwest

5

chillicothe, oh

5

hebron

5

andrews, sc

5

Steubenville, oh

5

andrews, sc

5

Cleveland

5

hebron 19

benefits

UnitedHealthcare

| Health Tip

UnitedHealthcare UnitedHealthcare

| Health Tip | Health Tip

Health tip: Health tip: tip: Understanding preventive care Health Understanding preventive care care Health tip: Understanding preventive Preventive care is routine health care thatpreventive is meant to help you stay healthy. When you schedule Understanding care regular appointments and screenings, it may help you manage and maintain your health. UnitedHealthcare

| Health Tip

Preventive care is routine health care that is meant to help you stay healthy. When you schedule Preventive care is routine health care that is meant to help you stay healthy. When you schedule Preventive care is generally focused onhelp the you following regular appointments and screenings, it may manage and maintain your health. regular appointments and screenings, it may help you manage and maintain your health. • Evaluating your health when you are symptom-free Preventive care is routine health care that ison meant to help you stay healthy. When you schedule Preventive care is generally focused the following • Receiving checkups and screenings focused Preventive care is generally on the following regular appointments and screenings, it may help you manage and maintain your health. • Decreasing the risk of developing health issues even if you are in the best shape Evaluating your health when you are symptom-free • Evaluating your health when you are symptom-free your life checkups and screenings • of Receiving • Receiving checkups screenings focused on the following Preventive care and is generally • Decreasing the risk of developing health issues even if you are in the best shape • Decreasing the risk developing health issues even if you are in thecare best shape Understand theofdifference between preventive • Evaluating when you are symptom-free of your life your health of your life • Receiving checkups care and screenings and diagnostic

Understand the between • Decreasing the risk ofdifference developing issues evenpreventive if you arebe in covered thecare best by shape • Preventive care is designed to helphealth you stay healthy, and may most Understand the difference between preventive care of your life with $0 out-of-pocket health plans when you see an in-network provider. and diagnostic care and diagnostic care

• may be incurred for diagnostic care based on plan coverage. Checkby your • Costs Preventive care is designed to help you stay healthy, and may be covered most Understand the difference between preventive care • Preventive care is designed to help you stay healthy, and may be covered by most plan documents details. health plans withfor $0additional out-of-pocket when you see an in-network provider. health plans with $0 care out-of-pocket when you see an in-network provider. and diagnostic • Costs may be incurred for diagnostic care based on plan coverage. Check your • Costs may be incurred for diagnostic care based on plan coverage. Check your • Preventive care isfor designed to help you stay healthy, and may be covered by most plan documents additional details. plan documents for additional details. health plans with $0 out-of-pocket when you see an in-network provider. • Costs may be incurred for diagnostic care based on plan coverage. Check your plan documentsCare for additional details. Preventive Diagnostic Care

Schedule an appointment with Schedule an your doctor Schedule antoday appointment with Routine preventive care appointment withmay help youdoctor manage and maintain your today your doctor Schedule anistoday your health, and generally Routine preventive care may appointment with Routine preventive care may covered 100 percent by most help youatmanage and maintain help you manage and maintain health plans. your doctor today your health, and is generally

your health, and is generally covered preventive at 100 percent most Routine care by may covered at 100 percent by most health plans. help you manage and maintain health plans. your health, and is generally covered at 100 percent by most health plans.

Preventive care includes routine well Diagnostic care includes care or Preventive Care Diagnostic Care exams, screenings, and immunizations treatment whenCare you have symptoms or Preventive Care Diagnostic intended to prevent or avoid illness or risk factors and your doctor wants Preventive care includes routine well Diagnostic care includes care or to Preventive care includes routine well Diagnostic care includes care or other health problems. diagnose them. exams, screenings, and immunizations treatment when you have symptoms or Preventive Care Diagnostic exams, screenings, and immunizations treatment whenCare you have symptoms or intended to prevent or avoid illness or risk factors and your doctor wants to intended to prevent or avoid illness or risk factors and your doctor wants to other health problems. diagnose them. Preventive care includes routine well Diagnostic care includes care or When is care considered preventive? other health problems. diagnose them. exams, screenings, and immunizations treatment when you have symptoms or A procedure can be considered preventive care in some situations, but not in others. This is important, because a service has intended to prevent or avoid illness or risk factors and your doctor wants to to be considered preventive in order topreventive? be exempt from copays, coinsurance or deductibles. If it’s not, these charges may apply. When is care considered other health problems. diagnose them. When is care considered preventive? A procedure can be considered preventive care in some situations, but not in others. This is important, because a service has Preventive A procedurecare canexample be considered preventive care in some situations, but not in others. This is important, because a service has to be considered preventive in order to be exempt from copays, coinsurance or deductibles. If it’s not, these charges may apply. to be considered preventive in order to be from copays, deductibles. it’s not, charges mayaapply. A woman hascare an annual wellness exam andexempt receives blood testscoinsurance to screen fororanemia, kidneyIfand liver these function, and has urine When is considered preventive? analysis done. If the physician orders lab work during a preventive care visit some of the tests may be covered as preventive Preventive care example A procedurecare canexample be considered preventive care in some situations, but not in others. This is important, because a service has Preventive care, such as a cholesterol screening. A woman has an annual wellness exam and receives blood testscoinsurance to screen fororanemia, kidneyIf and liverthese function, and has urine to be considered preventive in order to be exempt from copays, deductibles. it’s not, charges mayaapply. A woman has an annual wellness exam and receives blood tests to screen for anemia, kidney and liver function, and has a urine analysis done. If the physician orders lab work during a preventive care visit some of the tests may be covered as preventive analysis done. If the physician orders lab work during a preventive care visit some of the tests may be covered as preventive Preventive care example care, such as a cholesterol screening. care, such as a cholesterol screening. A woman has an annual wellness exam and receives blood tests to screen for anemia, kidney and liver function, and has a urine 20 continued analysis done. If the physician orders lab work during a preventive care visit some of the tests may be covered as preventive care, such as a cholesterol screening.

Preventive care includes routine well Diagnostic care includes care or exams, screenings, and immunizations treatment when you have symptoms or intended to prevent or avoid illness or risk factors and your doctor wants to other health problems. diagnose them. Diagnostic care example Diagnostic care example However, other blood chemistry panels like an anemia screening in a non-pregnant woman, a kidney or liver function test and

However, other blood chemistry like an anemia screening in a non-pregnant woman, a kidney or liver function testorand urinalysis,is would not be coveredpanels as preventive care. The woman would be responsible for any deductible, coinsurance, When care considered preventive? urinalysis, not be covered as based preventive care. The woman copaymentwould that may applicable on her benefit plan. would be responsible for any deductible, coinsurance, or A procedure can be considered preventive care in some situations, but not in others. This is important, because a service has copayment that may be applicable based on her benefit plan. to be considered in for order to be exempt from copays, or deductibles. If it’sit not, these charges maythe apply. When a service ispreventive performed preventive screening reasonscoinsurance and is appropriately reported, will be covered under When a service performed for preventive screening reasons and is appropriately it will be covered the the Preventive Care isServices benefit. Check your plan documents consult with yourreported, health care provider prior under to having Preventive care Services example Preventive Care benefit. Check your plan documents and consult with your health care provider prior to having the service performed if you have questions. A woman has an annual exam and receives blood tests to screen for anemia, kidney and liver function, and has a urine service performed if youwellness have questions. analysis done. Ifof thepreventive physician orderscare lab work during a preventive care visit some of the tests may be covered as preventive Examples include care, such as a cholesterol screening. Examples of preventive • Routine physical examinations care include • physical examinations • Routine Immunizations Diagnostic care example

• • Immunizations Well baby andblood well-child care panels like an anemia screening in a non-pregnant woman, a kidney or liver function test and However, other chemistry Diagnostic care example care continued • Well baby and well-child • Mammography, colonoscopy, urinalysis, would not be covered sigmoidoscopy as preventive care. The woman would be responsible for any deductible, coinsurance, or However, other blood chemistry panels likeonanher anemia screening in a non-pregnant woman, a kidney or liver function test and • Mammography, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy copayment that may be applicable based benefit plan. • Cervical screening urinalysis, would not be covered as preventive care. The woman would be responsible for any deductible, coinsurance, or • Cervical screening Diagnostic careisexample When a service performed for preventive screening reasons and is appropriately reported, it will be covered under the copayment that may be applicable based on her benefit plan. Preventive carechemistry isbenefit. important because Preventive Careblood Services Checklike your documents and with yourwoman, health care provider prior to having However, other panels anplan anemia screening inconsult a non-pregnant a kidney or liver function testthe and When a service is performed for preventive screening reasons and is appropriately reported, it will be covered under the Preventive care is important because service performed if you have questions. urinalysis, not be covered as preventive care. Themay woman be responsible • Regular would preventive care visits and health screenings help would to identify potential for any deductible, coinsurance, or Preventive Care Services benefit. Check your plan documents and consult with your health care provider prior to having the • Regular preventive care visits and health screenings help to identify potential copayment that be applicable based on her benefitmay plan. health risks formay early diagnosis and treatment. service performed if you have questions. risks for diagnosis and treatment. Examples of preventive care include • health Helping prevent disease and health issuesreasons at an early is essentialreported, to When a service isearly performed fordetecting preventive screening andstage is appropriately it will be covered under the • Routine Helping prevent disease and detecting health issues at an early is essential living a healthier life. Preventive Care Services benefit. Check your plan documents andstage consult with yourtohealth care provider prior to having the • physical examinations Examples of preventive care include living a healthier life. service performed if youcare have questions. • Immunizations Following preventive guidelines — and your doctor’s advice — may help you to stay • • Routine Following preventive care guidelines and your doctor’s advice — maywith helpyour youdoctor. to stay healthier.physical Be sureexaminations to discuss specific—health questions and concerns • Well baby and well-child care healthier. Be of surepreventive to discuss specific health questions and concerns with your doctor. • Immunizations Examples care include • Mammography, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy • Well baby and well-child care • examinations • Routine Cervical physical screening • Mammography, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy • Immunizations • Cervical screening Preventive is care important because • Well baby andcare well-child • Mammography, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy Regular preventive care visits and health screenings may help to identify potential Preventive care is important because health risks for early diagnosis and treatment. • Cervical screening • Regular preventive care visits and health screenings may help to identify potential • Helping prevent disease and detecting health issues at an early stage is essential to health risks for early diagnosis and treatment. living a healthier life. is important because Preventive care • Helping prevent disease and detecting health issues at an early stage is essential to • Regular Followingpreventive preventivecare carevisits guidelines — and your doctor’s may help you to stay • and health screenings mayadvice help to—identify potential living a healthier life. healthier. Be sure to discuss specific health questions and concerns with your doctor. health risks for early diagnosis and treatment. • Following preventive care guidelines — and your doctor’s advice — may help you to stay • Helping prevent disease and detecting health issues at an early stage is essential to healthier. Be sure to discuss specific health questions and concerns with your doctor. living a healthier life. • Following preventive care guidelines — and your doctor’s advice — may help you to stay healthier. Be sure to discuss specific health questions and concerns with your doctor.

Register on myuhc.com. Register on myuhc.com. Find a provider, get plan coverage details and more. Find a provider, get plan coverage details and more.

This information is for general informational purposes only and is not intended nor should be construed as medical advice. Individuals should consult an appropriate medical professional to determine what may be right for them. This information is for general informational purposes only and is not intended nor should be construed as medical advice. Individuals should 5/21 ©an2021 United HealthCare Services, Inc. All Rightswhat Reserved. consult appropriate medical professional to determine may be M57233-J right for them. 5/21 © 2021 United HealthCare Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. M57233-J

21

leader spotlight

22 March

savannah

TUCKER

accounts payable | hebron, oh How long have you been with MPW? Since September 2020 Do you have a hidden talent? Yes, I am very creative and can craft pretty much anything. What is the theme song of your life? “As the World Falls Down” by David Bowie If you could live anywhere, where would you live? Tokyo, Japan What is the best advice you ever got? Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter, and those who matter don’t mind. Favorite place to eat Mark PI’s Favorite book The Lord of the Rings series Biggest pet peeve Someone chewing food with their mouth open. Any advice for newbies at MPW? Stick in there; this really is a great place to work and it has extraordinary people here. Favorite season Spring, start of Festival circa. Personal hero David Bowie, even have a memorial tattoo. Family Joseph Tucker – Husband and Ethan Tucker – Step Son Hobbies I have a lot and they are a bit strange. Dressing as a Viking for festivals, and traveling with a Troupe called the Lost Vikings teaching people how to throw Axes. Creating bug art, collecting taxidermy/animal bones, collecting antique dolls and crocheting/sewing.

ron

COLLINS

customer service manager | toronto, ontario How long have you been with PPS? Eleven years. What other positions have you held at PPS? General laborer, leadhand, night supervisor, afternoon supervisor, dayshift supervisor and assistant plant manager. What has been the most influential part of your career? Watching and learning others’ leadership skills and organizational skills. What is the theme song of your life? “Don’t Come Around Here No More” by Tom Petty If you could live anywhere, where would you live? Would only live in the general area of my daughter and granddaughter, so if they moved to New Zealand, that would be great! What is the best advice you ever got? Treat others with the respect you would want. Favorite place to eat The Keg Favorite book “MPW Leader” Biggest pet peeve Not being on schedule. Any advice for newbies at MPW? Listen, learn, communicate. Favorite sports team Maple Leafs Family Daughter and granddaughter Hobbies I play guitar and piano.

22

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